The Value of a Good Education

On Thursday 17th March 1881, Henry DARLEY, 42, attended his first Spelling Bee, acting as Chairman for the social evening, held in the Spa Saloon, Filey.

Juveniles under fourteen were tested first. All the local elementary schools were represented and Florence PICKERING took the first prize and Tom SCRIVENER the second. I have no record of Florence but Tom was twelve-years old, son of one of the town’s doctor. Both children attended Mrs Holmes’ school.

A Miss “BRAWSHAW” of Beach House was victorious in the adult competition, with Mr RICARDO second. Neither is to be found in Filey Genealogy & Connections. Thinking the lady may have been wrongly transcribed, I looked among the Brayshaws and Bradshaws without finding a likely candidate.

The chairman said that they had two  more prizes for anyone in the audience  to compete for, and he would very glad for them to go on to the platform while the band was playing. Twenty-one competitors stepped forward, but many of them were soon disposed of, six of them coming down with “Oolite”. After that good stand was made, but eventually all the gentlermen succumbed, and only five ladies were left, when some most excellent spelling was gone through, and then another breach in the  ranks was made, when the field was left to Miss MacCullen and Miss Latham.   Between them the contest was  most  severe. The  two  were spelling upwards of ten minutes, when Miss Latham gave way, and Miss MacCullen remained the victor.

“Miss MacCullen” was almost certainly one of the McCALLUM sisters. Lucy Eliza, 39, was headmistress of the school she ran at Clarence House, West Avenue, with younger sister Margaret. 34. Both ladies can be found on the FamilySearch Tree under the name McCULLUM. (In both the 1881 and 1891 censuses, Lucy’s middle name is Martha.)

A good bet for Miss LATHAM is Rose, 28, a Governess working for the NICHOLSON family where one of her charges was Maud. Aged eleven in 1881 this child would later marry the much older Arthur Nevile COOPER, vicar of Filey for fifty years.

During the evening several duets were sung by Miss MacCullen’s pupils, Dr. Haworth, and the Vicar [Rev. Cooper], accompanied on the pianoforte by Miss Latham.

The McCallum sisters put education before marriage but in her mid-thirties Rose married widower Thomas Newton HARRISON in her home village of Tattershall, Lincolnshire.

The Scarborough Mercury reporter ended his piece –

We understand that another spelling bee and  a geographical  bee will be  held in about a fortnight. We hope that all who possibly can will go, as we feel assured that a more enjoyable evening has not been spent at Filey than on the occasion of the spelling bee.

The Spa Saloon would subsequently become Ackworth House and it has retained the name following extensive renovation. This morning it was unblemished in the morning sunlight – all the builders’ stuff gone and with furniture on the balcony shared by owners of favoured sea-facing apartments.

Wave 39 · Filey Bay

Filey Promenade (near Ackworth House)

The Tide Has Turned

Alan Jones reports on the abuse of Zoe.

Dying in Harness, Drowning in the Med

I have been doing more research into the three wives of William MOORE. In passing, I had noticed some references to a Nurse Catherine NICHOLSON who had served with some distinction in hospitals on the Western Front. I imagined William’s third wife undertaking those terrible duties. There seemed to be a couple of Nurse Catherines but they were, I think, Home Counties or Scots women.

William’s Catherine was the fifth of ten children born to Edward NICHOLSON and Annie McCORMICK between 1870 and 1889. By the time the 1911 Census was taken, five of the children had died. About a year after she married William, Catherine’s younger brother lost his life while serving with the 1st/4th Bn, Cheshire Regiment. I was initially puzzled that he died at sea but a look down the list of fatalities on 4 May 1917 provided a partial answer.

85734 Private JOHN PERCY MULLINEUX      Royal Army Medical Corps

TF/202635 Private GEORGE NAYLOR MUMBY   4th Bn. Royal Sussex Regiment

55989 Private PATRICK MURPHY    Royal Army Medical Corps

M/273823 Private CHARLES WILLIAM MURRELL        906th M.T. Coy. Army Service Corps

Captain RICHARD OWEN NELSON     Army Service Corps

36336 Private JOHN HENRY NICHOLSON      1st/4th Bn. Cheshire Regiment  

63192 Private JOHN NISBET       Royal Army Medical Corps

Second Lieutenant CLAUD NORIE-MILLER    Army Service Corps

53628 Serjeant WILLIAM HENRY NORMAN     Royal Army Medical Corps

48050 Private CHRISTMAS GEORGE NORTHAM  1st/5th Bn. Welsh Regiment

70481 Private JOHN NOUTCH       Royal Army Medical Corps

 

There are 274 men who died this day and are remembered on the Savona Memorial in Italy. The bodies of a further 82 were recovered and are buried in the Savona Town Cemetery. They were not all fighting men. In the cemetery lies Barber THOMAS BONAR CHERRY of the S.S. Transylvania Mercantile Marine Reserve.

Transylvania

They were bound for Salonika, or onward to Egypt, and their grand troopship was sunk by torpedo off the Italian coast near Genoa. About four hundred drowned but over 2,000 were rescued, the majority by two (allied) Japanese destroyers.

One of those rescued, Walter Edward WILLIAMS of Weston super Mare,, was interviewed many years later and he tells his story of the sinking on Reel 2 (of 5) here. Searching for SS Transylvania online will raise more accounts of this event.

From the Nicholsons, I moved on to the family of William’s first wife, Annie Elizabeth COWAN. Tracing the origins of her father proved to be an engaging and enjoyable challenge. Thomas Albert began his life as a COWIN in Lonan Parish on the Isle of Man but ended it as a COWAN in Dalton in Furness, Lancashire 74 or 75 years later.

1911_COWANthosa_Census
1911 Census Form

His record on FamilySearch Tree has a link to an obituary published in Manx Quarterly #20. Here is an extract: –

The Barrow Guardian of December 9th had the following reference to the death of Councillor Cowan:-“Died in harness! This expression was never more fully realised locally than by the passing away of Councillor Thomas Albert Cowan, of Dalton, a man full of years and honour. At the time he was attacked by a sudden illness he was on his way to Barrow to fulfil a promised preaching appointment for a minister who was ill. It is quite true and appropriate to repeat what a friend of Mr Cowan’s said to me on Sunday evening: ‘He was taken when doing his Master’s work.’ And he was never happier than when performing some religious duty; it was ingrained in him. He had spent over 50 years as a local preacher and religious teacher; then for more than 25 years he was associated with the local Board and Urban Council, for 21 years a member of the Gas Committee, some years on the Education Authority and Burial Board, and one of the trustees of the Billincoat Charity. Truly he was a marvellous man. If he could do a good turn to anybody he was only too willing to give his services. As a speaker he was fearless, impassioned and convincing, hence his success in the early days of Nonconformity in the Furness district, when he fought tenaciously for the rights and privileges of his fellow dissenting citizens. I repeat he was a wonderful character, and could turn his hand to many things besides mining, religious work and temperance work. Where he will be most missed, however, next to his own home, will be in the Primitive Methodist Church, for here he was ever first and foremost, and none will ever know what he did and what he gave to his loved Bethel. We mourn the loss to-day of one of God’s noblemen.”

Another Man’s Wife

MOOREwm&cath

I initially warmed to the Reverend William when I discovered he’d been baptised at Mappleton Church, a mile or so north of his birthplace in Cowden. My parents had a caravan (of sorts) on the Mill Field at Mappleton and, when on holiday there, I walked past the church several times a day on the way to and from the beach. It seems neat that he should end his days in Filey, as I am likely to do.

I also learned that his grandfather had been one of William CLOWES’ first converts in my hometown, Hull in the 1820s. I attended the Primitive Methodist Chapel in Stoneferry as a child and, as a young man, went up to Mow Cop one wild, windy night after I learned of the early Ranters’ Meetings there.

I was surprised to find William had married three times – and taken aback when I looked for him on FamilySearch Tree and saw him hitched to a fourth woman, Elizabeth Ann ALSTON.

William’s birth family seemed to be all present and correct and at the time of the 1901 census, he was living only eight miles away from Elizabeth Ann and the cotton spinning William Moore.

“Our” William was in Wigan, mourning the death of his first wife Annie Elizabeth COWAN about six months earlier.  The other William and Elizabeth Ann were childless in Chorley.

Here is a newspaper report of the wedding of William and Annie Elizabeth just five years earlier.

1896_MOORE&COWAN_marriage

Ten years later the Reverend was staying with his younger brother, James, in Hull. With him were second wife Margaret FISHER and their surviving child, William Henry, aged three. Margaret died about 18 months later, in West Derby – where William married Catherine NICHOLSON in the second quarter of 1916. They moved to Filey in 1919 and each died aged 78, William in 1944 and Catherine in 1955. Their last home, “Hilston”, was in Belle Vue Crescent.

There are photographs of William and Catherine, and more information, here.

Mrs. Nicholson Does Good

District Intelligence: Filey

School Treat

[Last] Saturday afternoon the children of the Church day and Sunday schools had their annual treat. A substantial tea was provided, and in the evening prizes were distributed to about three hundred. They were given by Mrs. Nicholson, of the Crescent, who last week gave a tea to twenty-nine little girls, whom she teaches sewing. She also has provided a soup kitchen in Hope-street, and distributes soup to the poor twice a week.

Scarborough Mercury, 14 January 1882

Annie NICHOLSON was 34 years old in 1882, a mother of three girls and engaged in the kind of good works you might expect from an older woman whose children have flown the nest. But she’d met her husband at the age of thirteen (perhaps earlier) and buried him at 29 so perhaps she was old beyond her years. (She would die in 1902, aged 54.)

For the second half of her life, she lived at 11, The Crescent, Filey – the photograph below was taken this morning, her front door just visible in the twin portico.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Her husband, Walter NICHOLSON, was the fifth of thirteen children born to the wealthy and ennobled Leeds Magistrate and Landed Proprietor, William Nicholson NICHOLSON, and Martha née RHODES. (William had changed his birth name, from William Nicholson PHILIPS, so that he could inherit the Nicholson estate at Roundhay Park.)

Walter led a busy and financially rewarding life as a manufacturer and farmer yet still found time to be a Guardian for the Wharfedale Union. He left Annie well provided for when he died aged 37, in 1877. No. 11 The Crescent had five servants in 1881, 3 in 1891, and 4 in 1901.

Annie WHITAKER was born in Liverpool in 1848 but the Census snapshot of 1861 captures her visiting the home of William FISON in Burley in Wharfedale. He was a manufacturer who employed over 400 workers. Another visitor that Census night was 21-year-old Walter NICHOLSON. The couple must have made a great impression on each other, and married seven years later at St George’s church in Everton.

The Nicholsons of Roundhay Park are well represented on the FamilySearch Tree – and two of Walter’s brothers threaten to draw attention from the dutiful Annie. The colourful story of Rhodes Tudor and Albert Henry can be found in this PDF. It complements the NICHOLSON and Nga (Wha Wha) RITAKA pedigrees on FST.

When I first looked at his pedigree, this morning, Walter was lacking a wife. Annie was on the Tree with her parents so I united her with her six siblings, joined her unto Walter and gave them their three girls. The youngest, Maude, married the 40-year-old vicar of Filey when she was just 21. Arthur Nevile COOPER is still talked about today as “The Walking Parson”. (He would leave his Filey flock untended for months on end to ramble across Europe, once to Rome, another time to Florence.)  For all his elevated position in the community and long life, I couldn’t find him on FST. He has a presence now but there’s work to be done to give him some forebears.

Great Grandmother Ross

Five years ago I wrote a brief post about a John RICHARDSON, charged with being drunk while in charge of a horse. I mentioned that there were three men with this name of similar age in the 1881 Filey Census but that “Furious John” was easily identified by occupation. The others were a fisherman and a “seaman”.

Seaman John, born 1831, doesn’t have a record in Filey Genealogy & Connections. In 1881 he was enumerated aboard the George Peabody in Great Grimsby, his four crewmates also  Filey men. They should really have been described as fishermen.

Rather surprisingly, the other two Johns do not have children noted in their FG&C records so I thought I’d take a closer look.

G69_HESSELWOOD_20170501_fstThe imbiber’s pedigree took me back to a name found on a stone slab in Filey churchyard that  triggers thoughts of my own family – HESSELWOOD. (I have a cousin who spent some of his childhood in Hesslewood Orphanage). The inscription is difficult to read (impossible in the photograph) but eight people are remembered, including “two daughters of John and Mary RICHARDSON”. This Mary, nee ROSS, is our John’s Grandmother (1754-1822) who had at least ten children, one of them John’s father, William (1787-1868).

I’m not sure why this straightforward bit of genealogy should arouse curiosity but I cast my net wider to haul in four more John RICHARDSONs in FG&C born between 1809 and 1827 and checked their relationship to Mary HESSELWOOD, mother of Mary ROSS. Only one, born 1815 and the son of Richard and Dinah nee CAMMISH, was not related to her by blood. The other five were her great grandsons. One was a younger brother of the carriage driver who died aged about three but given that Mary had only one child and died aged 27 this bunch of relationships is quite astonishing to me.

Mary’s father was  a Customs Officer, William HASLEWOOD, “who died November the 21st 1778 aged 81 years” (Entry 137, Filey, St Oswald’s Monumental Inscriptions Part One, G69 in Crimlisk/Siddle). Father and daughter are on FamilySearch Tree as HASELWOOD, IDs  MGCT-5WP  and MGCT-54V.

MaryHASELWOOD

Here is my RootsMagic update of the FG&C pedigree of George Lightfoot RICHARDSON.

RichardsonPedigree2

If you read the old LaF post you should discount Ann PROCTOR as being Jehu John’s wife. It appears that Betsy Ann, the little girl he accepted as his own daughter (and who took his name), was the illegitimate child of Ann NICHOLSON born 1850. The following year mother and child were enumerated in Rillington about 16 miles away from the mother’s home parish of Muston; Ann’s status “unmarried”, Betsey Ann’s birthplace given as Rillington (PRO ref HO107 2369 f73 p18). Ann and John married in the June Quarter of 1853 and in 1855 there is a GRO Birth record for a George Lightfoot Richardson, mother’s maiden name Nicholson. This is the only record I have found to indicate that John had children of his own. Sadly, the boy survived no more than six months.  After Ann died aged 59 in 1886 John married again the following year. Mary BARKER was eighteen years his junior and brought a 17 year old illegitimate son to the marriage. Aged 20 in 1891 Richard BARKER was working as a Carriage Driver for his Carriage Proprietor step-father (PRO Ref RG12 3962 f22 p37). The two Johns born a year apart (1826/27) died in 1903 and 1907. I can’t be certain but I think the Jehu was second to depart, aged 81. Mary died in 1828.

Tags: family history Hesselwood, Haslewood, Richardson, Nicholson, Baker, Ross, John Richardson, Jehu.

20160706MallardDuckling3_2mTwenty-four hours before Today’s Image was taken Mother Mallard was keeping an eye on her brood. I don’t know what killed the ducklings but the surface of the Glen Gardens boating lake was liberally sprinkled with specks of plastic or polystyrene (the measure of man). A breeding pair of Mallard brought five or six ducklings into the world at the same location this year. I saw the little ’uns one day and they had totally disappeared the next. A council gardener said that gulls had taken them. The bereft adults flew away a couple of days later.