The Lost Boys

The wooden brig Eugenie was built in Blyth in 1855 and registered in North Shields. On February 2nd, 1886, she left the River Tyne on her final voyage, with a crew of eight and about 360 tons of coal in her hold. Five of the sailors were apprentices, ranging in age from 16 to 21. They reached the estuary of the River Seine without incident and discharged their cargo, replacing it with 86 tons of stone ballast for the return journey. Before departure, the master received instruction to make for Cardiff or the Tyne, “according as the wind might serve”. Eugenie left Honfleur on the 20th and Thomas JONES, 48, decided to go home rather than to Wales. The ship made slow progress up the east coast of England and on the night of the 1st and 2nd of March sailed into a “blinding snowstorm”. Between five and six in the morning, near Craster, Eugenie struck a rock so violently that she broke up and sank almost immediately. All hands were lost.

A few days later the Coroner held an inquest on a body that had been “found on the shore at Howick Burn Mouth”. The father of apprentice James KELLY identified his 17-year-old son.

Beach at the mouth of the Howick Burn
cc-by-sa/2.0 – © John Allan – geograph.org.uk/p/5523421

Another sailor found near Howick Burn was not formally identified but was assumed to be A.B. John Young HINDS, aged about forty. Not far away, recovered papers and a photograph identified Anton Lanitz OLSEN, 21, from Christiania. He had signed A.B. articles and acted as Eugenie’s cook and steward but was still bound as an apprentice. The body of the mate, James PINKNEY (or REDMAID or REDMOND), was not found, and neither were those of the three apprentices, William Charles SCRIVENER, 19, Joseph TAYLOR, 17, and Charles CLEGHORN, 16.

William was the son of Filey doctor, Charles Waters Scrivener. When I researched the family three years ago, I somehow overlooked William. Born in Newcastle upon Tyne in 1867, he was with his grandfather Thomas Scrivener on census night 1871 and not christened until later that year – after the death of his mother, Jane Margaret née SWEET. In 1881, William was a boarder at a Scarborough school run by James WALKER in Castle Street. His father had remarried 18 months after Jane’s death and would die in 1882, aged 48, without having children with Mary Ann WOODALL.

The family is well represented on the FamilySearch Shared Tree but some relationships have yet to be fleshed out a bit more clearly. When apprentice William was born, his maternal grandmother Elizabeth Sweet was also his aunt. Another day perhaps…

Field 9 · Filey Fields

Emily’s Brother

I have given Emily Dawson some company on FamilySearch today – brothers, sisters, in-laws, nephews and nieces. Wondering again why she chose exile from her heartland.

I mentioned her brother the shipowner yesterday. In the next census, he was following his father’s trade, butchery. But a short obituary following his somewhat sudden death at the age of 59 mentions his links to shipping.

1903_DAWSONjohn_Obit

Three of the seven children John had with Emily (HEWISON) had died aged 8, 9 and 10, leaving Errington, Lilian, John Albert and Sydney “to mourn”.

There is a gallery of old North Shields photographs here. Sadly, Dockwray Square doesn’t feature but there are a couple of pictures of Stan LAUREL, born in Ulverston but living in North Shields around the time of John’s death.

Today’s Image

The old Coalbrookdale oak seems to be alive and well in the latest satellite imagery. Here it is in full leaf (and 3D) on Google Earth.

20191024CBDoak

For a wider view, here are the coordinates: – 52°38’36” N 2°30’14” W.

Remembering Forgetful Emily

20191022EmilyBPunknownWhen Emily’s husband of 21 years filled out the 1911 census form, he owned up to not knowing where she had been born. John CAPPLEMAN, 50, had been a fish hawker for much of his working life. Emily was running a newsagent business from their home at 55 Queen Street.

Ten years earlier the enumerator had written “don’t know” in the space for Emily’s birthplace, and didn’t give her an occupation.

In 1891 they had been married for about eighteen months and were living in Cambridge Yard, West Street. John was working as both a fisherman and a hawker of the creatures he caught. In the enumerator’s book, “Newcastle on Tyne” is given as Emily’s birthplace.

In 1881, Emily was with her older brother John, visiting a married sister in Kent. Jane Ann’s husband, Alexander FAIRBROTHER, was a farmer with radical inclinations. He gave two of his sons the middle names Cobden and Bright. The birthplace of the three Dawson siblings was given as “Shields, Northumberland”.

In 1871, at home with their parents in Dockwray Square, Tynemouth, all six Dawsons in residence offered North Shields as their birthplace, even though mother Jane (formerly BIRBECK) had been born in York.

In 1861, Errington “DAUSON” and Jane were enumerated at 13, Dockwray Square, with six children born in North Shields (and their mother in her rightful birthplace).

Errington Dawson was a butcher and his son John became a shipowner. The family was clearly settled in North Shields and although several of Emily’s siblings died in infancy there is no obvious reason why she would choose to forget her roots in later years.

Why did she move to Scarborough during the 1880s? In 1888 a list of bankrupts was published in the local paper and there was an Emily Dawson among them. If this was “our Emily” she had failed to make a go of keeping a lodging-house. The following year she married John Cappleman. They were together for thirty years but didn’t have any children.

G608_CAPPLEMANemily_20120807_fst

I had to create an ID for Emily. Her parents already had representation on the Shared Tree but were waiting for me to play matchmaker. There are other nuptials to be noted and quite a few missing children created. The gathering of these has been made easier by a contributor to the new Find My Past system of sharing trees. For now, though, Emily doesn’t have much of a family on FamilySearch.

SD ‘Research’

This was a fishing vessel that may have been just about worthy on a mill pond, but in heavy seas whipped by gale force winds, it put the crew of nine in the greatest danger, this day 1925. Had it pushed through the storm to Bridlington in deep water it might have survived but it grounded on Smithwick Sands and was overwhelmed by the waves. None of the crew survived and their bodies were never found.

Eight of the men were from Filey, five of them from one family. The ninth was James SOUTHERN, the boat’s engineer. Kath has a note in Filey Genealogy & Connections to the effect that James took the berth because he had six children and it was coming up to Christmas.

The tragedy is well described in Allen and Todd’s book, Filey – a Yorkshire Fishing Town, and you can read the extract at the Scarborough Maritime Heritage Centre website.

A plaque on the wall of St Oswald’s Church remembers all Filey fishermen who “perished at sea & whose bodies were never found” between 1901 and 1848. A quarter of their number was lost from Research. The eight have memorials in the churchyard – on four headstones. Jane Baxter CRIMLISK née JENKINSON asks us to think of her father, husband, two brothers and a cousin. (A third brother, James Henry Newby JENKINSON drowned in another place at another time.)

F87_Research

In loving memory of JANE B. CRIMLISK, born 1885, died Sep 20th 1931. Also of her husband GEORGE J. CRIMLISK, born 1885, and her father and brothers JOHN R. JENKINSON, born 1862, ROBERT JENKINSON, born 1890, GEORGE F. B. JENKINSON born 1897, WILLIAM C. CAMMISH, born 1895. All drowned in the RESEARCH disaster.

The brothers Edwin Chapman and George JENKINSON, cousins to ‘Jack Sled’, are on a stone by the church, and Joseph Edward COLLEY with his parents and a sister, Amelia. William Cappleman CAMMISH has a second mention on another family stone.

I couldn’t find Ted and George on the FamilySearch Tree but the other lost Jenkinsons are gathered here.

The rustbucket on which they perished is recalled on Filey Promenade and you can see where she went down on a ‘thumbnail’ chart at Wreck Site.