Call of the Wild

Have you ever imagined being dropped by a helicopter onto the summit of Everest without oxygen? A physician in a New York ICU says that some of the Covid-19 patients he has seen are presenting as if they have just been rescued from such an experience. Cameron Kyle-Sidell tells the story in six minutes. It chimes with Dana Ashlie’s video, (Wednesday’s post).

I’ve been a good old man today, taking less than my allocated hour to saunter along the prom, view the sea and sky and take in some fresh air, seeing one soul. Back in my cell, I heard Prof. Knut Wittkowski say –

Going outdoors is what stops every respiratory disease.

He isn’t a fan of locking people up and countries down. Journeyman Pictures released their interview with the Professor about a week ago and before that offered another perspective on the pandemic given by Dr John Ioannidis. It will take a couple of hours of your life to watch both videos but if you are seeking a better understanding of the crimes now being perpetrated on humanity…

The sometimes rather dour UK Column News closed today with this…

Skydiver

 

Flight of Fancy 19 · A Water-world Grey

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I saw this fellow in a wave breaking onto the Royal Parade steps this morning. I have just noticed he was not alone. Seeing eye to eye with ET. (Maybe I’ve caught cabin fever.)

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The Winter of Man

Under this title, an essay by Loren Eiseley was published in the New York Times almost fifty years ago. A hundred years ago an “Eskimo shaman” told the explorer Knud Rasmussen –

We fear the cold and the things we do not understand. But most of all we fear the doings of the heedless ones among ourselves.

After taking us on a quick tour from humankind’s tropical genesis to life on the edge of an ice-covered world Loren writes –

Today we have science, we do not fear the Eskimo’s malevolent ghosts. We do not wear amulets to ward off evil spirits. We have pierced to the far rim of the universe. We roam mentally through light-years of time.

Yes, this could be admitted, but we also fear. We fear more deeply than the man in the snow. It comes to us, if we are honest, that perhaps nothing has changed the grip of winter in our hearts, that winter before which we cringed amidst the ice long ages ago.

For what is it that we do? We fear. We do not fear ghosts but we fear the ghost of ourselves. We have come now, in this time, to fear the water we drink, the air we breathe, the insecticides that are dusted over our giant fruits. Because of the substances we have poured into our contaminated rivers, we fear the food that comes to us from the sea. There are also those who tell us that by our own heedless acts the seas are dying.

We fear the awesome powers we have lifted out of nature and cannot return to her. We fear the weapons we have made, the hatreds we have engendered. We fear the crush of fanatic people to whom we readily sell these weapons. We fear for the value of the money in our pockets that stands symbolically for food and shelter. We fear the growing power of the state to take all these things from us. We fear to walk our streets at evening. We have come to fear even our scientists and their gifts.

And the latest gift? SARS-CoV-2. Life-coach Richard Grannon offers his thoughts.

(Do not fear those among us who run around supermarkets like heedless chickens looking for toilet paper.)

 

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Knud Johan Victor Rasmussen 1879 – 1933
Photographer not credited, n.d. Wikimedia Commons

Loren Eiseley has a distinguished pedigree with a line passing through several High Stewards of Scotland to, inevitably, Carolus Magnus. Not bad for a humble American bone collector.

Deaths by Pandemic and Natural Causes

Alan, my source for Skipsea COLLEY information, explains how George Toyn met Charlotte WARLEY.

My great grandfather, George Toyn Colley, now orphaned at the age of three, was packed off to live with his cousin, Robert Pape of Beverley. He was a Master Builder and the £600 G.T.C. had inherited from his father was left in his trust. Robert Pape brought G.T.C. up as if he were his own child. At age 21 then, my great grandfather came into his father’s bequest, and set upon moving to London to start up a bicycle business. Before leaving Yorkshire, he had occasionally to stay the night at Middleton on the Wold. He was unable to find lodgings and was directed by staff at a local public house to try at the grocers. Here he met the daughter of the house, Charlotte Warley. He fell instantly for her, exclaiming that she was the most beautiful lass he had ever seen. He stayed much longer than intended, and eventually leaving for London, vowed that once his business had been established, he would return to marry her. This he did, marrying on 26 December 1885 at Middleton on the Wold. They returned to London and had four children, adopting another: George (born 11.05.1886).

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Alan has provided this photograph of a portrait painting of Charlotte. The artist is unknown and one can only guess at the painting’s date.

Charlotte married at eighteen, gave birth to her first child aged 20 and her fourth (and last) at 35. If a hundred people were asked to guess her husband’s occupation on the evidence of this image, I would be surprised if any would hazard “bricklayer”, his trade in 1901 and 1911.

In 1911, the family is at 103 Whitehorse Lane, South Norwood, Croydon. It seems that the house has been demolished to make way for a Sainsbury’s supermarket and petrol station, but other properties in the immediate vicinity are modest – two up, two down at a guess.

The most lethal pandemic in human history, until now, began in military camps in the United States and came to Europe in the lungs of soldiers. It seems odd, though, that Spain was the first old-world country to be seriously infected. The “Spanish ‘Flu”, soon spread to Britain where peak deaths occurred in October and November of 1918.

Charlotte was 51-years-old when she succumbed to the infection. Find her on the Shared Tree.

The “most beautiful lass” (and handsome woman) was, perhaps, not all that she seemed. In the last year of her life, she was a witness at a Coroner’s inquest into the death of her younger sister.

THE DEATH OF AN IMBECILE

An Inquest was held by the Croydon Coroner on Tuesday on Foly Warley, 40, a spinster, who died in Croydon Infirmary. Mrs Charlotte Colley, of Whitehorse Lane, South Norwood, sister of the deceased, said she was an imbecile, and had been so all her life. Witness had not been advised by any doctor to send her to the infirmary. “I liked to keep her for company,” said the witness. “She was no good to me, but she was not quite helpless.” The Guardians contributed 4s. weekly to her maintenance. By Dr. Passman’s directions she was taken on Saturday to the infirmary, and died the next day. Ellen E. Wing, an adopted daughter of the last witness, assured the Coroner that the deceased was well cared for. Dr. R. W. Wilson, medical superintendent of the infirmary, said he received her as an imbecile. She was in a verminous condition, and had bronchial pneumonia, to which death was due. The Coroner thought the deceased was not so clean as she might have been. Dr. Wilson added that the deceased was well nourished and apparently had not been treated unkindly. A verdict of “Natural causes” was returned.

Norwood News, 25 January 1918