Two Lives Cut Short

To the left of the path leading up to the door of St Oswald’s (Today’s Image) are two ‘table graves’. Both remember a “George Fowler”.

On the right, George FOWLER, a land and ship owner who died aged 61. To the left, George Fowler TAYLOR, who lived for just 22 years. The young man succumbed to consumption at the home of his aunt, Mrs George Fowler, on The Esplanade, Scarborough. (A different Mrs George Fowler is memorialised on the adjacent tomb.)

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On this day in 1895, Fanny Deadman Hanson (born SCOTTER) was buried in the churchyard. She was 21 years old and had been married to fisherman husband, John Henry, for just 14 months. I haven’t discovered the cause of her death. Phthisis may have taken her too – it was one of the biggest killers in Victorian Britain – but perhaps she died in childbirth.

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I have put this headstone photograph on FamilySearch Tree. (The angel, pointing upwards, symbolises “a sudden departure or untimely death”.) John Henry married again and had five children with Annie Elizabeth PASHBY.

Just Agnes from Somewhere

On my afternoon walk yesterday I bumped into the second great-granddaughter of Agnes in Glen Gardens. From the comfort of her mobility scooter, Ann was keeping an eye on her own great-granddaughter in the children’s playground. Our long-time-no-see conversation quickly turned to family history and I promised to look into one of Ann’s mysteries.

I will get to the main affair eventually (I hope) but was soon sidetracked by Agnes and Richard.

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I focused on this couple initially because they are remembered on a headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard.

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In loving memory of RICHARD PASHBY, died Jan 28 1890, aged 50.

Also AGNES, wife of the above, died July 23 1897, aged 54.

Also FRANCES & EMILY, their daughters aged 23 & 27 years.

Also JANE HUNT, mother of the above, died Sep 23 1895, aged 91.

‘Forever with the Lord’

Also GEORGE NELSON, died in infancy.

As you can see from the screenshot, FamilySearch Tree is not very illuminating with regard to Richard and Agnes. Both are separated from their parents and neither can be pinned immediately to time or place. Record hints direct attention to useful Census returns but these haven’t yet to be attached to the pair.

Filey Genealogy & Connections is much more helpful, offering all eleven of the children that can be found in the GRO Births Index. (Infant “George Nelson“  was a grandson of Richard and Agnes.)

FG&C  gives Richard’s parents as Thomas Pashby and Jane CAMMISH but without the dates of their deaths. The MI above suggests that Thomas died quite young and Jane remarried. There is, indeed, a Free BMD record of Jane Pashby marrying Joseph HUNT in Scarborough in the December Quarter, 1856. On another fragment of pedigree awaiting connection on FST, there is a record hint for Richard’s older sister Ann, revealing the Pashby household sheltering lodger Joseph Hunt in 1851. He is a Somerset man, 12 years younger than Jane.

FG&C also does better with the birth family of Agnes, giving her parents and five siblings. Her mother, “Mrs Sarah Jackson” is a PEARSON in the GRO Births Index. All the children were born in Snainton near Scarborough. Father John was born in Ebberston, the next village westward along the present A170.

Now I’ll have to knuckle down to putting Agnes Jackson of Snainton on FST and adding her headstone photo… and joining Richard to the other section of his pedigree on the World Tree.

The Alternative Brothers

Their graves in St Oswald’s churchyard are about 60 paces apart. John’s stone has been out in all weathers for over 30 years longer than his brother’s and it hasn’t worn well.

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The incised letters on Warcup’s stone are still sharp a hundred years after they were cut.

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Warcup was baptised a CROSIER…

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…but he signed his apprentice indenture form and the marriage register on his wedding 1846 as CROSHER.

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Warcup and Ann’s three girls came into the world as Croshers and departed as either Crosier or Crozier in official records. Only the youngest girl married – as Elizabeth Ann Crosier. For this family unit “Crosier” is written in stone.

One wonders if the two brothers talked about changing the family name. They clearly didn’t see eye to eye. Not only did John marry as a Crosher but his son with Elizabeth the Second did too – and died a Crosher in 1971.

Variant family names are an occupational hazard for family historians. I suspect most arise from misunderstandings by record takers (initially) and digitizers/transcribers (in recent years). Not many are at continuing variance by parental or sibling choice. A quick look at the Index of Volume 2 of the East Yorkshire Family History Society’s St Oswald’s Monument Inscriptions shows only one family in this sort of conflict. Crosher/Crosier.

John is with his first wife, Elizabeth PASHBY, who died childless (it seems) at the age of 44.

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About fourteen months later, at the age of 54, John married Elizabeth MILNER, a spinster aged 35. Her widowhood lasted 36 years and her grave, next to John and the other Elizabeth, has a flat tablet letting the world know who placed it there.

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In loving memory of ELIZABETH, second wife of JOHN CROSHER, who died October 16th 1919.

Erected by her son GEORGE HENRY CROSHER Hon. Steward of Westminster Abbey.

Find George Henry on FamilySearch Tree.

Today’s Image

I posted a photo of Ironbridge Gorge last autumn but titled it Landscape 61, forgetting I had an empty category for “Old Life” pictures. My faithful companion, Jude, departed for the Big Kennel on this day five years ago. Six years to the day before that we enjoyed a lovely walk on a bright, frosty morning – and he waited patiently while I made this panorama.

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The Sandholes are between Jude and the risen sun. I don’t know if it is true, but I understood that the sand taken from this place was of a particular kind, perfect for making the moulds into which molten iron could be poured to make useful and/or decorative cast iron objects. Half a mile from this viewpoint, more or less straight ahead, is one of the Cradles of the Industrial Revolution, and an iconic brick structure – The Darby Furnace, where iron was first smelted using coke.

If you copy and paste these coordinates into Google Maps and hit Satellite View you’ll find yourself at the Sandholes.

52.633737°,  -2.500155°

Sandholes

The Old Life ended when Jude and I left Middle England for the Yorkshire Coast, about four months after the Sandholes photos were taken. Here’s a picture of him taken in Filey in March 2009. I miss him, but he’s not really gone away.

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Sudden Death

On Thursday morning, as Mr. William Pashby, fishmonger, of Filey, was in the act of dressing himself after getting out of bed, he felt rather unwell, sat down in his chair, and died almost immediately. Deceased was 85 years of age.

The Scarborough Mercury, Saturday, 12 November 1859

As a Folkton man, William’s ancestors are few on Filey Genealogy & Connections. His male line goes a little further back on the FamilySearch tree but in an unconvincing fashion. It is a different story with his direct descendants. Five of nine children raised families – giving him over 30 grandchildren. I lost count figuring the succeeding generation’s output. Nineteenth-century marriages bring several Filey dynasties into play and some of their forebears go back to the 1500s.

One has to journey way further into the mists to reach the common ancestor of wise apes and the representative of the Phocidae family cast up on Herring Hill this morning. Between 80 and 100 million years to be inexact.

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The seal was silent, and looked uncomfortable rather than distressed. It did not seem to be upset by the handful of people gathered nearby. Someone had already phoned for help but the RSPCA would be at least an hour in coming. Attempts to contact Sea Life in Scarborough hadn’t yet been successful.

The creature had a nasty wound to the throat; not so deep as to appear immediately life-threatening. The bleeding had stopped. First thoughts of observers were that it had become entangled in nets but the suggestion that its throat had been cut by a fisherman was not ruled out. Grey and common seals are protected by law on this coast all year round – from being killed, injured or taken, but that would not stay the hand of some men. A couple of years ago, while walking on the Brigg, a very unwise ape pointed to the bobbing head of a seal some yards from shore and said, “He’s taking our fish.”

Let’s see where the Sixth Extinction takes us.

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