The Two Husbands of Hannah Welburn

The Hoylands of Hoyland Common confirmed my fondness for geographical rather than trade family-names. (You can keep your bakers, turners and, especially, smiths.)

Hannah is a WELBOURNE in some sources, but I will favour WELBURN. Hannah was born in 1839 in Pickering, which is just fourteen miles from the village of Welburn. There is a Welbourn in Lincolnshire and one online fount of knowledge claims this is the original home of all Welbourns. The variant spellings, including Welburn, may all mean the same thing – a well by a stream or spring – so the first English Welburns could be from anywhere.

Hannah’s father James was a cooper and after her birth, the family moved a few miles to Driffield. There are sources on FamilySearch for Hannah and three siblings, but they don’t yet form a coherent unit on the Shared Tree.

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In 1861, at the age of 21, Hannah is enumerated at the family home in Westgate, Driffield, her occupation given as “Publisher’s Labourer”. Six years later she marries Samuel Sanderson HARRISON. In 1871 Samuel is described as a “Shopman (Draper’s Assistant)”. He clearly did well at the job because in 1881 he is a “Draper Master”. The couple remains childless though, and in the autumn of 1888, Samuel dies aged 46.

Hannah is named in the probate documents, but a young man called Alfred Herbert WELBURN (sometimes WELBOURNE) has insinuated himself into the family. He was a 14-year-old visitor at the 1881 Census and supposedly a nephew of Samuel, but in 1891he is head of the Harrison home in Middle Street South, Driffield, occupation Draper. Hannah is the next named, a widow “living on her own means”. Alfred was the son of Hannah’s brother, Richard.

In the summer of 1893, Alfred marries Mary Anne ROSS, Hannah’s stepdaughter. Her marriage to Primitive Methodist Minister Castle Ross had been registered three months earlier.

In 1901 Hannah is with Castle and his daughter Jane, a 26-year-old Music Teacher, in Glastonbury, Somerset. In 1911 the Minister’s house in Bournville is somewhat more populous. In addition to Hannah, there are Castle’s daughters Margaret, still single at 31, and Emily. Emily’s husband Alfred Wilson is there too, with their children Dorothy and Emily.

Hannah dies in Bournville in the spring of 1914, aged 74.

Castle returns to Filey, the place of his birth, dying here in 1928 aged 88. The inscription on his stone in St Oswald’s churchyard doesn’t “remember” Hannah.

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In loving memory of CASTLE ROSS, Primitive Methodist Minister,

who entered the higher life May 23rd 1928, aged 87 years.

Also of JANE, wife of the above, who passed on Oct 25th 1882, aged 45 years;

interred in Brigg cemetery.

‘For me to live is Christ and to die is gain’

Phil. 1. 21

Today on the Shared Tree he has only one wife, but the Welbourne connection is clearly indicated.

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Castle’s youngest daughter, Margaret Maud, is named in the probate documents and it is perhaps she who decided what the inscription should be on her father’s headstone. I feared initially that Hannah had been “disappeared” without a sign anywhere of her existence, but was happy to discover that she is remembered on her first husband’s gravestone in Driffield.

A Tailor of Filey

George STERICKER didn’t reside in Filey long before he died. He married Sarah HODGSON in 1852 and their first daughter was born in Pickering a couple of years later. Their second daughter was born in Filey towards the end of 1859 and George died about three months later.

Sarah went back to Pickering, the place of her birth, to raise the girls, making her living as a dressmaker. Firstborn Mary Elizabeth married David TINDALL in 1879 and moved to Huddersfield with him to bring seven children into the world. Four were alive in 1911. Maria Ann married John William WILKINSON in 1884 and they too moved to Huddersfield. In 1911 they were living quite close to the Tindalls and all five of Maria’s children had made it through to their mid-teens and early twenties.

Sarah didn’t marry again and stayed in Pickering. Aged 68 in 1891, she was boarding with two elderly sisters in Potter Hill, still dressmaking. Curiously, a few doors away there was a Stericker family – Thomas, 31, his wife Ann, three children under six and a nurse servant called Mary Tindall who looked after them.

Sarah died in March 1896 and was laid to rest in Pickering. She is remembered on George’s stone in St Oswald’s churchyard.

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Find George on FST.