The Postmaster’s Clock

Early in 1905, Filey Postmistress Mary Eliza YOXON had to retire because of ill-health (see A Shropshire Lass two days ago). The vacancy was filled towards the end of the year by George Newcombe TOOKER. I wrote about George on 17 May (The Postmaster’s Son) and some weeks later was pleased to hear from two of his descendants. Grandson Mike Tooker has kindly sent me a photo of the clock George received from his Plymouth colleagues before heading north, and has given me permission to share it here.

Encased as it is in Connemara marble, the clock must be quite a weight, but it has made the journey to the antipodes, and back and forth within New Zealand perhaps. Right now it is telling South Island time.

I was told a few days ago that the house I identified as “Chez Tooker” in Mitford Street wasn’t built until 1916. I subsequently found it clearly shown on the 1911 Ordnance Survey 1:2500 map. So, for now, I stand by the photograph posted in May.

Wave 38 · Filey Bay

Filey Bay

Water Drops

The Martin’s Ravine cascades this morning  – as they should look in a dry spell. I can only think that I happened to walk by yesterday just after the Muston Road *tank” had been emptied as part of the Flood Alleviation Scheme works.

The Postmaster’s Son

He was generously named but sadly neglected on the FamilySearch Shared Tree. He has even been deprived of his capital letters.

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Tooker, W G N 1907I became interested in his story because I found, in a dusty folder on an external drive, a photograph of his father. George Newcombe TOOKER was 39 years old when the picture was taken and he had been living in Filey for just a couple of years. Born in Princetown, Devon in 1868, he waited until he was almost thirty before marrying Mary Anthony ROWE – and shortly afterwards volunteered to fight in the Boer War. “Fight” is somewhat misleading. He delivered mail. A local newspaper gave an insight into his career trajectory.

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He arrived in Filey with Mary and two children. One source gives their address as 39 Mitford Street but the 1911 census insists it was No.38. The latter address is more fit for a postmaster but is nonetheless modest. (I am assuming that the street has not been re-numbered in the last century or so.) Chez Tooker has the pale blue door.

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Hedley was born here on 2 December 1911. In September the following year, George is attending a presentation in Plymouth, honouring an “old and respected comrade” at the Post Office. It was “a most pleasant evening”.

Mr Fred Ham’s song, “River of Dart”, was very much appreciated by the company. Mr Jack Marshall favoured his brother telegraphists with “Baby Face” in excellent style. Mr P. Soper was also in good voice. Songs were also rendered by Messrs. Avery, Jeffery, Tooker, Dart and Curle.

…Mr Dart, representing the junior staff, said they thanked Mr Hart for the interest he had taken in them: he was always ready and willing to impart the little intricacies of the “test box” to any of the younger officers.

Mr Tooker referred to Mr Hart as a “jolly good fellow,” and a man who had always done his duty with sincerity and good grace.

George may have returned to Filey with ideas of returning permanently to his home patch. The electoral registers show the Tooker family back in Plymouth at the beginning of the Twenties.

All three of the children married. Edna Mary became Mrs MADDICK in 1927, Leslie married Thirza SMITH the following year, and Irene Patricia Merci DESPARD matched Hedley for given names in 1934.

KingsAshRdPaignton_154_GSVWhen the 1939 Register was taken in September 1939, Hedley was working as an Assurance Agent in Paignton, Devon, living at 154 Kings Ash Road (left) with Irene and their son Michael, 4. A daughter, Mary, was born in 1940. It seems that Hedley joined the RAF at the beginning of the war and, when the conflict was over, the family emigrated to New Zealand. Hedley and Patricia are buried in Whangerei, Northland. Find a photograph of their headstone at Billion Graves.

There is still work to do, but Hedley and his forebears are on a bigger Shared Tree stage now.

Path 91 · Church Walk

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Lives Cut Short

James VARLEY arrived to “keep” The Crescent Hotel in about 1877. He was experienced in the trade, having helped his parents to run The Cross Keys in Market Place, Hull, for many years.

James’ monument in St Oswald’s churchyard is a distinctive and emblematic broken column and recalls two lives that didn’t last as long as they should have. His second child, Henry James, had an accident while playing, or perhaps helping out, at Church Cliff Farm. A cut became infected with Clostridium tetani and within a few days, he died at the Hotel, aged ten.

Six years earlier, Henry’s mother had died, a day after her thirtieth birthday.

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In 1901, James was living on Crescent Hill with his unmarried daughter Clara. He died in Hunmanby five years later, aged 62, and was brought to Filey for burial.

I wrote a short post about the family on Looking at Filey: Suffer Little Children. I didn’t know back then what had become of Clara but today found a death registration in York that may be hers. If confirmed, she didn’t marry and reached the age of 93.

James and his parents were on FST, and Kate’s mother had an ID too. I will add some more Varleys and Morrishes and, perhaps, hit upon a connection to a more extensive pedigree.

Today’s Image

I was shocked to discover how old the “new bridge” on Filey Promenade is. Here’s a photo taken two years earlier (to the day)…

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