The Rudston Mausoleum

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For too long the Mausoleum was a storage place for old lawnmowers and bits of plywood and timber. I was pleased this morning to see that an attempt has been made to clear it of rubbish. Maybe soon the structure will be afforded the full respect it deserves. There was some talk a while back of seeking a mason who might repair the stonework, perhaps even restore the structure to its original state. The cost would be enormous.

The shield-shaped plaque above the west windows bears an inscription that explains the building’s purpose.

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This monument was erected by the eldest son in honour of his father and mother.

Is also testimony of affection for his 8 brothers and sisters  and for other members whose names are inscribed within.

One of those named is William John –

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I searched under the assumption that he was a RUDSTON and failed to find him or any of his 8 siblings. This is really The BROWN Mausoleum.

But the Rudston name has great cachet in East Yorkshire, though quite where William John’s mother, Emily Rudston, fits into a long and complicated pedigree has yet to be discovered – by me at least.

Emily married the Reverend John Henry BROWN at All Saints Church, Sculcoates, in June 1838. Their first two children were born in Hull, the next two in Liverpool, two more in East Retford and the last three in Brewood, (pronounced Brood), Staffordshire. I don’t know how many are sleeping beneath the tiled floor. Kath has a note in Filey Genealogy & Connections for Harry COWLING (1920 – 2005), “an absolutely lovely man”.

He was a choirboy and had to go down to the Rudston Memorial – right down.  The steps to the mausoleum were not immediately outside the memorial, they were a bit further down the path so he and Jimmy Brown – as choirboys – had to go down with the funeral party. He told me that they were scared stiff.

It seems likely that the Rudston family name comes from the monolith that gave an East Yorkshire village its name. Eight hundred years ago there may have been a connection to the influential de GANT dynasty but they seem to have established themselves for generations at Hayton, near Pocklington. The pedigree is difficult to trace with certainty, in part because of a three-way split into Rudston, Calverley Rudston, and Rudston-Read. Andrew Rose has generously placed his fascinating narrative of The Rudstons of Hayton and Allerthorpe on the Pocklington History website.

You can find John Henry BROWN on the FamilySearch Tree but his wife Emily’s link to the Hayton Rudstons, if there is one, is not clear. I haven’t had time yet to check through all of Kath’s Rudstons and Rudston-Reads on Filey Genealogy & ConnectionsThere may be some answers in plain view there.

Sleigh Ride to Mount Pleasant

I have been led astray the last three days – on a long and circuitous journey taking in Middle England, Scotland, Holland, and India, with a fanciful spin round Amen Corner on the way.

There are countless places in the English speaking world that have areas called Mount Pleasant – see how many there are in and around Swansea – but I fetched up just 20 miles north of Filey, in Robin Hood’s Bay.

Intrigued by the rather quick remarriage of Thomas Matthew EDWARDS, following the too early death of Elizabeth Alice STORY, I went in search of Ann NICHOL. She was 36 years old when she married Thomas in 1882 and I found soon enough that her maiden surname was possibly SLEIGH. I fired up the LDS 1881 British Census – I have my family’s heartland counties in a FileMaker database – and searched for Ann. Imagine my surprise…

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Well Road doesn’t exist anymore in Bridlington unless it is masquerading as Well Lane, but I was really pleased to see the widow Nicoll next door to her parents. Young Ann had also had a son with George NICOLL, given name Linwood, his grandmother’s maiden surname. I haven’t found a record of his death but he would have been ten years old in 1881. All four Nicoll children were born in Forfarshire/Angus, Scotland.

George NICOLL, a Scotsman, had married Ann SLEIGH in Kings Norton, Worcestershire in 1866. He took his young bride home and died aged 49 in Forfar, in 1878. Ann returned to England with the three girls, met widower Thomas EDWARDS and his young son Walter William, joined forces and moved from Bridlington with her parents to her mother’s hometown, Pocklington. Young Ann’s marriage lasted no time at all. Thomas died in 1884.

I don’t know what happened to the boy EDWARDS over the next twenty years but in 1891 Ann and two of the girls were living in The Balk, Pocklington, and her parents not far away in Percy Road. Lily had gone up to Scotland on a visit.

As chance had it, Pocklington’s GP was Dr. Alexander Ferrier Angus FAIRWEATHER, born in Holland to the Reverend Robert of that ilk who, for four years, led the Scottish Church in Rotterdam.

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Dr. Alexander’s eldest son Robert, also a medical man, born in Balfron (Stirling), married Lily NICOLL in Pocklington in 1893. Death cut that marriage short too. I haven’t established when or where the younger Robert FAIRWEATHER died – best fit is Tynemouth in 1897, aged 32 – but at the 1901 Census widow Lily was working as a school matron in London.

Lily’s grandmother, Ann née LINWOOD, died in Pocklington shortly after the 1891 census was taken, and John SLEIGH followed her to the next world five years later. In 1901 Ann EDWARDS was settling into Mount Pleasant, Robin Hood’s Bay, with unmarried daughters Annie and Bessie, (now going by “Nita” and “Bettie”). This section of the village today has three stretches of road designated Mount Pleasant North, South and East and there is little chance of identifying the Edwards house. But this image from the Francis Frith Company will give an idea of what it was like then. Not so distinguished now. (Photo: Google Street View.)

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At the 1911 Census, Ann and daughters Lily and Bessie (once again) are together at Mount Pleasant. I don’t know what happened to Annie but I did catch up with William Walter EDWARDS, now a cashier at a paper mill in Tamworth, married to Mary Frances née RANFORD, with a daughter Alicia Clare, 7, and son Raymund Walter, 5. Both children were born in the area from which their step-grandmother had hailed.

North of the border, the FAIRWEATHERs had celebrated their triumphs and endured some tragedies. Dr. Alexander’s older brother, John Bisset, born in Rotterdam, died aged 60 after a swift and sad decline, his health possibly affected by 13 years spent on a coffee plantation in India. His sister, Isabella Guthrie married a soldier and gave birth to her third child on the sub-continent – and died aged 27 when the wee lad was just two years old.

And what of Amen Corner? The mother in law of the first Alexander Ferrier Angus was Margaret LOW  of Stonehaven and he agreed to his second child being christened Margaret Eliza Low FAIRWEATHER.  If you are of a certain age (and British) you will understand why I was triggered.

Most of the folk mentioned in this post can be found on FamilySearch.