At Eight Weeks

At the end of the first quarter of Meteorological Year 2018/19, the two hemispheres (each represented by 5 Weather Stations) were running Mean Temperatures above Pre-Industrial that differed by only one-hundredth of a degree Centigrade. North 1.31, South 1.32; rounding to a Global figure of 1.32 above P-I.

Things are very different this year. At the end of Week 8, four of the northern stations are in the “red zone” – more than 2°C above P-I. Rome is in the orange zone – above the Paris Target but below two degrees. They combine to yield a hemisphere average of 3.7°C above P-I.

8_NORTH_MeancfP-I

The biggest contributor to this increase in relative warmth is Koltsovo, the coldest of the five stations. (The daily mean there has crept above zero centigrade on just three of the 56 days.)

8_Koltsovo_MeancfP-I

The GFS 10-day weather forecast model shows a huge cold air mass moving east from Europe across the Federation – I’m expecting a dip over the next couple of weeks but it is a long way down to 2 degrees above P-I. It may take a Grand Solar Minimum to get it there by the end of the year.

Of course, returns from the thousands of other northern stations could bring my token average of 3.7C above P-I down to a figure that won’t frighten the horses. I have no way of knowing how representative my Ten Stations are. They could even be giving a false picture. These graphs should only be taken as an indication of what may be happening to global temperatures – and viewed in the context of current climate change hysteria.

After 8 weeks then, my North is running at 2.16°C warmer than the same period last year. My South is 0.7 degrees cooler. Putting the two together gives this chart of my “mini Globe’s” weekly differences, with a slight warming trend.

8_GlobeWkDiff20cf19

 

 

Weather Catch-Up

I’m still working on the Ten Stations but here is a graph showing the Daily Mean Temperature above Pre-Industrial Baseline for Durham Tees over the last ten weeks. The tenth week included the heatwave and its effect on the Year to Date average is clear. The Five Northern Hemisphere Stations include Rome, which also experienced the heatwave – but the other stations have diluted its impact.

DT&NH_25to34

Bear in mind that my Pre-Industrial Baseline is 0.85° below the 10 Year Mean (Meteorological Year 2008/9 to 2017/18), calculated daily for each station and averaged for the Hemispheres and Globe. I’ve given the start and end Mean temperatures for this period and “the math” is easy – indicating that Durham Tees is running cooler than the Ten Year average, and the five Northern Hemisphere stations warmer. (The southern hemisphere is warmer still.) This doesn’t necessarily indicate that global warming continues have the upper hand. I heard one amateur climate scientist declare on YouTube a couple of days ago that the recent European heatwave is a clear indication that the Grand Solar minimum is underway. He could be right, but Bob Henson’s “Full Scoop” points the finger at greenhouse gases. (Note that Bob mentions an observed 1°C rise in global temperature over the last century, making my 0.85-degree rise since, say, 1750, appear conservative.)

Southern Summer

Here are the results from five weather stations south of the equator –

SouthernSummerAboveP-I

There is no way of knowing if the TEN Stations together are representative of the Earth as a whole. They combine to give an AVERAGE temperature in the first quarter of the meteorological year of 1.22°C above the Pre-Industrial Baseline; a warming of 0.37°C.

Historical records show temperatures have typically fluctuated up or down by about 0.2°F per decade over the past 1,000 years. But trends over the past 40 years have been decidedly up, with warming approaching 0.4°F per decade. That’s still within historical bounds of the past — but just barely.

Scientific American

My station figures point to a rise much faster than historical, though it is probable that the next 9 months could see this quarter’s rate fall considerably. There is, perhaps, no need to be concerned, but the 0.85°C rise since Pre-Industrial does look a bit on the low side.

There is a dataset that offers an opportunity to compare the historical past with present experience. You can freely download the Central England Mean data from the UK Met Office website. I have an Excel spreadsheet with the annual thermometer-measured figures from 1659  to 2017. It, therefore, covers much of the Maunder Minimum period (1645 to 1710).

A Central England Baseline, averaging the AVERAGE (Mean) annual temperatures from 1659 to 1750, gives a figure of 9.02°C. Calculating the rise to 1960 and each decade thereafter (and finally to 2017) yields this graph.

CentralEnglandMean

Wow, that harsh winter of 1962/3 in England made its presence felt. The rise has reached 1.3°C above the Central England Baseline. Compare that with yesterday’s Northern Winter result of 1.27°C above the Global Pre-Industrial Baseline I have chosen.

The 52 years of the 65 years long Maunder Minimum covered by the Central England dataset averaged 8.8°C, only 0.22°C less than the Baseline figure (1659 to 1750). This suggests that Eddy, if he arrives, isn’t to be feared. Some have suggested that he will be no match for continuing human-induced warming.

Are things hotting up on the sub-continent?

The legacy media are not giving us much information about the conflict between India and Pakistan. After closing its airspace on Thursday, Pakistan seems to be allowing commercial flights over the country again but India’s north-west seems to be out of bounds still. In the screenshot below the highlighted jet is an Air India Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner from London Heathrow heading for Delhi.

20190302_PakIndAirspace2

Across La Manche, the Yellow Vests have protested for the sixteenth Saturday straight. The UK regime doesn’t want us to know about it. All quiet on the BBC front.

Northern Winter

It was 56 years ago, or thereabouts when a “new” maths teacher sat with me for some one-to-one tuition. After a few minutes, he told me what I already knew – I had no facility with figures. Mr Gibbins inspired me, though; I knuckled down. I’m sure he would have been amused had he known I got a job in a government department of statistics.

Anyway, the provisional temperature figures from my Ten Weather Stations are in. I don’t think, dear reader, that you will appreciate it if I throw too many at you, all at once. They tell a load of stories but  I’ll try to follow a moderation in all things strategy.

My original intention was to see if I could get an early warning of the onset of the promised Grand Solar Minimum – or of the sudden increase in temperature because of a threatened release of Arctic methane (from melting permafrost). The first three months of the current meteorological year don’t seem to point in either direction, definitively.

Yesterday, my YouTube recommendations included this video from Veritasium. It is quite short and, I thought, an excellent introduction to the uncertainties of Climate Change/Global Warming. I hope you will watch it.

Very briefly, I have copied the daily AVERAGE temperatures for Ten Weather Stations for the ten meteorological years from December 2008 to November 2018. For simplicity, I give each year the “name” of the 11-month year, viz 2009 to 2018, rather than 2008/9 to 2017/18 Averaging ten years of AVERAGE temperatures gave a ten-year baseline which enabled me to determine where warming has brought us since the start of the Industrial Age.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and other organizations tell us that temperatures have risen n degrees since “Pre-Industrial” (or some more recent baseline of their devising). I have decided it is pointless agonising over which baseline and which temperature rise to choose.

I’ve settled for a rise of 0.85°C since 1710. I mentioned in an earlier post that I thought this was “conservative” and heard someone offer a one degree C rise since 1850 a few days ago. Really, any reasonable “ballpark” figure will do, as long is it is rigorously applied to all the weather stations in the project.

I have calculated the pre-industrial baseline figure for each day of the year for the ten stations and for this first quarter of the meteorological year deducted the actual daily AVERAGE temperatures reported to Weather Underground.

Given the nature of the 2009 to 2018 baseline, one would expect temperatures for any day in 2019 to have a 50% chance (roughly) of being warmer. And, given the variability of our weather, the difference could be many degrees warmer (or colder). Averaging the AVERAGE daily temperatures for a whole month and comparing the result with the average for the 10-year baseline will reduce the difference – but it still might be more extreme than you’d expect. Averaging the three months of the Northern Winter and Southern Summer will reduce the monthly differences further.

And, thinking ahead, averaging the AVERAGE daily temperatures for the whole meteorological year will yield an annual figure that can be set against a statement such as, “The average global temperature has increased by 0.85°C since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution”.

So, how have my 5 northern stations fared this winter compared to the 0.85°C above Pre-Industrial of 2009 to 2018?

NorthWinterAboveP-I

A note on the colour coding in the first column.

BLUE: below the Pre-Industrial Baseline!

GREEN: between 0 to 1.49°C above Pre-Industrial.

ORANGE: above the Paris Accord but below 2°C.

RED: 2°C and more above Pre-Industrial.

The amount of warming and cooling this quarter is indicated in the second column.

Novosibirsk is the coldest of the five locations but, given the brutality of the Polar Vortex in North America, the Washington DC result is more surprising. As I said, these figures are provisional. I’ll check!

Still Getting Warmer

In the first two months of this meteorological year at my ten chosen weather stations, there were six instances of cooler temperatures and 14 warmer.

The five Northern Hemisphere Stations were, overall, 1.01°C warmer than the Ten Year Average (2008/9 to 20017/18).

The five Southern Hemisphere Stations were 1.18°C warmer.

“The literature” about present temperatures suggests varying amounts of global warmth above a notional Pre-Industrial Baseline. Initially, I was going to go for a low estimate (0.6°C) but decided on the middling 0.85°C instead.  NASA is currently suggesting the world has warmed 0.9°C since 1880 so I am being conservative.

So, I have set my Pre-industrial Baseline at 0.85°C above the TenYear Average. The figure is calculated daily for graphing purposes. I have added 1.5°C to give the Paris Accord limit we should attempt to stay below if we are to avoid even more extreme weather events than those recently experienced.

At the 10 Weather Stations in the last two months, the Average Daily Temperatures are 0.25°C above the 10 Year running average figure, leaving us just 0.4°C “to play with” before the Paris Accord limit is passed.

There is no way of telling how representative my chosen Weather Stations are, among the thousands reporting to Weather Underground. It doesn’t seem to matter though. Over the next year or two, the trend to either “runaway greenhouse” or Grand Solar Minimum chill must, surely, become apparent.

Right now the record cold temperatures in the US Midwest are causing a stir. The extreme warming that is forecast to soon follow there will keep tongues wagging. In the southern hemisphere, Australia’s heatwaves are crossing the Tasman and washing over New Zealand.

The warmest of my 10 Stations was Koltsovo, last month, registering 3.65°C above Pre-Industrial. If the Siberian experience is replicated everywhere for a whole year we are all toast.

NorthHemDecJan

SouthernHemDecJan

GlobalDecJan