Annie o’ the Brigg

On the 23rd January 1894, a gale blew a Filey coble into danger in the Bay. The three occupants were rescued by Matt JENKINSON’s yawl. With this minimal information from a note on Filey Genealogy & Connections, I hoped to fashion a brief post.

In the 19th century there were more people with this family name than any other and among them were several candidates for the owner of the life-saving fishing boat. Captain Sydney  SMITH’s database offered Matthews who owned cobles, herring cobles, and luggers but only one had a yawl, George Peabody, in partnership with the Roberts JENKINSON (senior and junior) and Charles REYNOLDS, a Hunmanby grocer. But that vessel was bought in the mid-1860s,  when “Brazzy” JENKINSON, one of my possibles for 1894, was only 16-years-old. Checking on various branches of the Filey Jenkinson tree took up most of the day and I failed to make a sure connection. So, no post.

I had only one photograph on file for Today’s Image and, by chance, yesterday’s research efforts provided a human story to go with it.

One of two Matthew Jenknsons born in 1832 had a 13 –year-old servant in 1871, Annie Jane PROCTOR. She was the niece of his first wife, Mary Jane Proctor, who had died seven years earlier. In 1873 Annie Jane earned extra money in the summer guiding visitors to the caves and pools at the back of Filey Brigg. The season was nearing its end when the PAGETs of Ruddington Grange, near Nottingham, came to Filey for a couple of weeks. Charles Paget, once a Member of Parliament, was 74 years old but still fit enough to negotiate the rocky shelves on the northern side of the Brigg. It wasn’t much more than an hour to low tide but it would appear from the story that has come down to us that Annie had a sixth sense of danger and urged her employers to return to a place of greater safety than a ledge near the Emperor’s Pool. Mr. Paget wanted to stay a little longer and was soon swept into the sea by a rogue wave, with his wife and sister-in-law. Annie managed to grab hold of Miss TEBBUTT, saving her life, but the Pagets were lost. There is an account of the tragedy here. Annie was misrepresented as “Emma Proctor” in every newspaper account I have found, and I have been unable to find any reports of her being thanked, let alone rewarded, for saving Miss Tebbutt.

The Paget family did pay for a stone pillar to be made by monumental mason William DOVE of Scarborough, bearing a warning to visitors. It stood near Agony Point for many years, on the south side of the Brigg, before suddenly disappearing. The inscription was later found and can be seen in the garden of Filey Museum.

Charles PAGET is on FamilySearch Tree but there are more of his children and forebears here. Stuffynwood offers a short biography.

Annie o’ the Brigg is not on FST but you will find her with husband Frederick and twelve children on FG&C.

Have another look at Today’s Image – the “Emperor’s Bath” is in the doodle beyond the foreground tide pool.

A Sign of the Times

On my afternoon stroll today I was surprised to see a couple of sinister-looking ships in the bay. My pocket camera did its best to shoot them…

20180124A900

20180124HMSCattistock

Two people walking their dogs on the beach told me the vessels were NATO warships. A friend at Flat Cliffs had clocked them already. When I got home Ship AIS confirmed they were part of a NATO force. A900 flies a Dutch flag and M31 the Royal Ensign. The latter ship is HMS Cattistock, a minesweeper, and appears to be Baltic-bound for three jolly months rattling the Russian bear’s cage. Let us hope she gets up to nothing more annoying than that. Sadly, the west seems to want a big profitable war and may find an excuse anytime soon.

The Barque ‘Unico’

G395_UNICOsailors_20170501_fst

Unico came to grief on Filey Brigg this day 1871. I favour her being the “barque” of the memorial obelisk rather than the “schooner” of this vivid report of her demise in the Driffield Times, 21 January.

Wreck and Loss of 13 Lives at Filey

The Italian three-masted schooner Unico, captain Angelo Dodero, coal laden from Newcastle for Genoa, which brought up in Filey Bay on Sunday, dragged her anchors in a gale of wind, before daylight on Monday morning, and struck upon Filey Brigg, and went to pieces immediately. Of the whole crew, thirteen in number, only one man, Litano Maccouchi, was found alive upon the rocks. A Newcastle pilot was also drowned.

The Inquest

On Wednesday, an inquest was held at the Ship Inn, before J. M. Jennings, esq., coroner, on the bodies of three men cast on Filey Brigg, whose names are Gaetano Paganetti (mate), Carlo Lavaggi (able seaman), and Francesco Bugino (apprentice). From the evidence of Litano Maccouchi it appears that the vessel Unico, with a cargo of 600 tons of coal, sailed from Newcastle-upon-Tyne for Genoa, on the 11th inst., having on board Capt. Didero, a crew of 12, and a Tyne pilot named Corbett. The vessel arrived off Flambro’ Head on Saturday 14th, and being hazy, with strong wind from S.S.W. the pilot requested her to be anchored under Speeton Cliffs; this done the vessel rode safely until Monday morning, when, thick with rain, a fearful gale sprung up from S.S.E., which caused the ship to drag her anchor. The pilot at once requested sail to be made, anchor to be slipped, and stand out to sea; this was done, but in doing so the Unico struck upon the extreme end of Filey Brigg. A heavy sea was running at the time and so great was the concussion that the ship’s bottom was stove in; at this momentary crisis part of the crew got into three boats, which were on deck, the other part of the crew took refuge on the fore-rigging; no sooner done than an awful sea broke upon the ship, swept the deck, and hurled the boats into the gaping sea, thus drowning at one blow eight of the poor fellows; a twin mountain wave followed, which burst upon the ship, carrying away the foremast, upon which were the other six clinging for life, but these were also thrown amongst the breakers, which were spending their fury upon the fatal rocks, only one rose to the surface to grasp a piece of timber to which he tenaciously clung, when another wave lifted and cast him upon a safer part of the rocks; fearfully bruised and bewildered he climbed upon a higher rock, and upon this rock he sat shivering for more than an hour, when he was found by two fishermen, who carried him over rocks and to the Ship Inn, where every care and comfort was bestowed upon him.

James Gondrill, fisherman, said: I left my house on Monday morning about 7.15 a.m. and went on to the Brigg, when I met two fishermen carrying a shipwrecked man; I proceeded further on the rocks and espied another one of whose hands was uplifted firmly grasping some seed weed: with assistance I lifted him up and found him cold and dead; a little further on I found another lifeless man, both of whom were taken to the Ship Inn.

The Coroner, having summed up, the jury returned a verdict of “Accidental Death.”

I think the reporter did rather better with the names of the unfortunate crew than whoever carved their names on the obelisk in St Oswald’s churchyard.

Here’s the Crimlisk transcription (the names are now obscured):

This stone is erected to commemorate a fearful shipwreck which took place

on Filey Brigg on 16 Jan 1871 of the Italian barque ‘Unico’ from Genoa

whereby 12 out of a crew of 13 including an English pilot perished

 

The following are interred in Filey Churchyard

ALGELO DODERO, Captain

GAETANO PAGANETTI, Mate

CARLO LAOAGGI, Seaman

FRANCESEAS BUGINO, Apprentice

and five others (Names unknown)

The East Yorkshire Family History Society transcription helpfully adds the Burial Register entries. These indicate that one body, supposed to be that of Captain DODERO, was not found for about ten days after the event and was interred with the others on 31 January.

*1871 Jan 19. Carlo Lauggi. Wrecked. 38.

*1871 Jan 19. Gaetano Paganetti. Wrecked. 37.

*1871 Jan 19. Francesco Bugiano. Wrecked. 17 yrs.

*These 3 men were washed up on Filey Brigg, from the wrecked barque Unico.

I walked to the overlook on Carr Naze this morning to photograph the scene of the wreck for Today’s Image. I was a little disappointed not be faced with a stormy sea and bruised sky but the upside was better light in the churchyard and Queen Street to picture two other elements of the story.

Fisherman “James Gondrill” was almost certainly James GOUNDRILL, born in Keyingham in 1839. At the census of 1871 he was living with his in-laws in Mosey’s Yard, off Queen Street, and working as a Gardener. Kath gives his occupation as Fisherman in Filey Genealogy & Connections but he began his working life as a Farm Servant (1851) and ten years later was a Servant to John Rook, the Miller at Mappleton. In 1881, still working as a gardener, he was living with wife Hannah and three daughters in Scarborough. The couple would return to Filey and be laid to rest in St Oswald’s churchyard. I didn’t have a photograph of their headstone in stock, probably because it is so hard to read, being well coated in lichen.

G549_GOUNDRILLhannah_20180116_fst

In loving memory of HANNAH, the dearly beloved wife of JAMES GOUNDRILL, who died April 19th 1898 aged 52 years.

For to live in Christ and to die is gain.

Also the above JAMES GOUNDRILL, who died Sep. 9th 1905, aged 66 years.

The grass withered, the flower fadeth. The word of God stands forever.

James and Hannah are on FamilySearch Tree but without their full complement of offspring and for the most part disconnected from their forebears. When I find the time I’ll attempt to bring them all together. I had a quick look at Italian records for Unico’s named crew without success. I hope Litano Maccouchi recovered from his ordeal and lived well, to a great age.

I walked the short distance to Queen Street to photograph the Ship Inn, sometime after 1871 re-named the T’awd Ship, and now a private dwelling.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

There is a fine view of the Bay at the end of the street and from Cliff Top a cargo ship was heading north beyond the Brigg. It was the Mistral, a Ro-Ro flying a Finland flag, heading for Teesport from Zeebrugge. Calm sea certainly, prosperous voyage maybe.

20180116Mistral1_1m

 

 

 

Kicked to Death

On this day 1894, at about seven o’clock in the evening, thirteen-year-old Samuel Dixon STONEHOUSE ran to his half-brother, William PROCTER, for help. When they reached the cottage in Barnett’s Yard, off Queen Street, accompanied a relative, Amos DANBY, and Police Sergeant CLARKSON, William was shocked to see his mother’s bruised and bleeding face. Maria said to him, “He has kicked me to death, I am dying.” William rushed away to seek medical help. Dr. ORR came quickly with parish nurse, Frances JENKINSON, and attempted to revive the woman, but she died within twenty minutes. All the while, Maria’s husband, Samuel STONEHOUSE, sat in a corner chair, proclaiming his innocence.

He was initially charged with wilful murder but at trial the jury quickly arrived at a verdict of manslaughter and the judge handed down a 14-year sentence. Samuel was not a stranger to prison. He had served a six-month sentence for battering his wife, not long before the final assault. He must, however, have behaved himself inside because he was released after nine years, initially into the care of the Filey “Church Army Society”, if the official documentation is a reliable guide. (Source: Prison Register, via Find My Past.)

1894_STONEHOUSEsaml_PRISONreg

I have never had any truck with men hitting women, even though there ain’t no limit to the amount of trouble they bring (B. Dylan), and had imagined Samuel to have been a hulking brute. I was surprised to see he was a “short-arse”.

Before his trial, he wrote to his mother, Elizabeth, and sister Elizabeth Annie, from his cell in Hull Prison:-

Dear mother, and sister and all, – Just a few lines to you, hoping to find you all well, as it leaves me well at present. Thank God for it. I hope my two children are both well. Remember me to them, and by God’s help I hope I may soon be with them again. My aunt was here yesterday, and told me that mother had gone to Filey, and I hope you will all do what you can for me. Will you write and let me know what you have done for me? I do not know whether I shall have anyone to help me at York or not, but I hope that I shall. I do not know when I shall be going from here, but I have been told that they (the Assizes) do commence next Wednesday. Will you let me know if my brother William or Abraham is going to York, and who is going to look after my children this year? It might be a long job for me at York, but I hope it will not. – Your son, SAMUEL STONEHOUSE.

At trial, the children gave evidence. The boy said his mother had asked for his assistance to help her on to the couch and his father had said that if he touched her he would “kick his bowels in”. But this exchange followed:-

Mr. Mellor: Your father was kind to you?

Witness: Yes, a lot better than my mother. Drunk or not, he was always kind to me.

Mr. Mellor: Have you ever seen her lying on the floor before?

Yes.

In what state?

She had been drunk. (Some sensation was caused in court by this statement, and the Judge said he must have silence or he would have the gallery cleared.)

Witness said on this occasion he supposed that his mother was drunk. She had formerly cursed his father when he came home to dinner, and she had thrown pots at him. (The poor lad burst into tears as he left the box.)

Born in Scalby, just outside Scarborough, Samuel Snr returned home after leaving Portsea  Prison. (He may also have spent time in Dartmoor.) His death was registered in the last quarter of 1920. He was 73 years old.

He outlived his son by four years. Samuel Dixon STONEHOUSE was killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme and is remembered in Fricourt New Military Cemetery.

Samuel Jnr had married before he went to war. Maria Louise was living at 32 St James Street in 1916 and at 44 James Street when the Second World War began. She died a Stonehouse in 1960, aged 82. I haven’t been able to find the marriage record or any children she may have had. Sam Jnr’s sister, Sarah, has eluded me too.

The Wayback Machine seems to be working again – it should be safe to access The Woman Who Cried Murder.

The blighted family can be found on Filey Genealogy & Connections and FamilySearch Tree.

Crimes & Misdemeanors

At the Bridlington Police Court on Friday 20th July 1883 before Lieutenant-Colonel PRICKETT and the Reverend C. W. HUDSON a Filey STONEHOUSE was charged with a breach of the Local Board Bye-Laws. The report in The Scarborough Mercury ran as follows:-

Abraham Warf Stonehouse, carriage proprietor, Filey, was charged with unlawfully standing in the Foreshore-road, and plying for hire on the 30th of June. In reply to the charge, defendant said he was standing on a piece of private ground, which he had rented for four years. Sergeant Bramley stated that about noon on the day named he saw the defendant standing with his carriage on the Forshore Road, but when he (witness) went towards defendant he drove on a few yards on to the piece of ground he mentioned. He had cautioned defendant a day or two before. Defendant having been convicted last year of a similar offence, was now fined 10s. and 9s. costs.

“Warf” is a local pronunciation of the family name WAUGH. In the early 1820s two WAUGH sisters married STONEHOUSE men whose relationship isn’t clear in Filey Genealogy & Connections (FG & C) – but both couples chose to call their firstborn sons Abraham Waugh.

The Abraham Waugh STONEHOUSE who found himself at odds with Sergeant BRAMLEY 134 years ago was the grandson of Samuel STONEHOUSE and Rachel WAUGH. Here he is (without his middle name) on FamilySearch Tree.

Abraham&AliceAnnSKELTO_fstScreenshot

Names in yellow are on FG& C. I have found GRO records for the 8 children in Kath’s database. FST has six children but the elusive Harry may be Henry.

Some of the girls from this generation of STONEHOUSE families married well in local society. It was the men who got into scrapes – and worse. A couple of them were charged with cruelty to a horse. Samuel, brother to our carriage proprietor, killed his wife. You will find him on FST with the ID L5TZ-8G3. (Daughter Ellen Elizabeth has a “data problem”; her date of death has been wrongly entered. It should be 1889.)

These two scraps of pedigree could be joined fairly easily but it would take more time than I have spare. As with other Filey families, turning to FG & C for help will bring dividends to anyone caring to undertake the task. At some point the STONEHOUSES link with the CRIMLISKS which grows a few more branches on the community tree. One of our cabman’s sons, Albert Charles, married Elizabeth GASH whose brothers were subject of a recent post. Before their deaths on active service in the First World War her husband’s cousin, Samuel D. STONEHOUSE, who ran for help when he witnessed his mother being killed, lost his life on the Western Front.  (There is a another twig in FS Genealogies for Samuel Dixon STONEHOUSE – it is from the Filey Community Tree I started to assemble when running the first incarnation of the Looking at Filey blog. Kath’s is more informative!)