A Dying Fall

Francis CHAPMAN married Ann SAWDEN in 1848, in Burton Fleming. Seven children were born to them between 1852 and 1865. For much of that time, Francis worked as a labourer on farms around Gristhorpe, in Filey parish. Ann died in 1879 when her youngest daughter, Hannah, was fourteen years old. Two years later, Francis was enumerated in Gristhorpe, sharing a house with another agricultural labourer, Francis FORDON, a man half his age who hailed from Ann’s village, Wold Newton.

The fortunes of Francis seem to have picked up thereafter and in 1891 he tells the census enumerator that he is a farmer. He shares a bigger house in Gristhorpe with daughter Hannah, now married to William HOOD, and three grandsons, the youngest called Francis Chapman Hood.

In 1901 Francis, given age 76, heads a household on Reighton Moor. He is nominally a farmer still, but the Hood family is with him and son in law William, 36, is the “farm manager”. Grandsons William and Francis, 17 and 13, are horse keepers on the farm.

At the beginning of December 1903, there is a curious accident.

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Francis had lingered for nine days after the fall. His body was taken to Filey to be buried with Ann. Over a century of weather has had little effect on their stone but it has had to suffer the indignity of a more recent memorial being set up against it.

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Francis, Ann and their children are on the Shared Tree. I have put the stone on their page as a memory. You may read their memorial verses in the description.

A Melancholy Suicide

Matthew COWTON was born in Reighton in 1808 but at some point moved to York where he was apprenticed to John DALE, Grocer and Tea Dealer. He married Jane JEFFERSON in York in 1830 and the first three of their children were born in that city. The next four opened their eyes in Scarborough, Jane’s home town before the family returned to York, where their last child and fifth daughter Frances was born in 1844.

Matthew gave his occupation as Grocer at the 1841 and 1851 censuses but also accrued wealth dealing in property. By some happenstance, he lost most of the property and, in some despair, turned to drink. Early in 1857, however, he managed to get some of his old properties back and was somewhat restored to health. In March he advertised the following Freehold Property in Reighton, near Bridlington:-

To be sold by Private Contract, Five Substantial Built COTTAGES, replete with every Convenience, and a Garden behind each; also a large Barn, Stable, and other Out-Buildings, with a Fold Yard adjoining the same, in the occupation of John Wood and others. The above Propery is situate in the centre of the Village. To treat for the same, apply to the Owner, Mr MATTHEW COWTON, 22, Goodramgate, York.

The following month, Matthew was appointed a Parochial Constable for Minster Yard with Bedern. In October he found himself accused, with several other policemen of assaulting two people he and a colleague were attempting to arrest – for being drunk and disorderly. Thomas and Mary Lyons put up a fight, using whatever implements came to their hands – a knife, a fender, a pan and a rolling pin. The constables called for reinforcements and eventually prevailed. By the time the Lyons reached the police station they were both bruised and bloodied and took out summonses against nine policemen, including Matthew.

The impending case must have driven Matthew back into depression and on Sunday before the case was to be heard, he got drunk by teatime, stumbled up to bed but hanged himself with a belt instead. Jane went up to check on her husband and found him awkwardly suspended. She called two men passing by the house and one pulled Matthew down. One of his sons saw he was still alive and a surgeon was called. Mr PROCTOR’s attempts to restore Matthew failed. After an Inquest in The Turk’s Head, the Coroner declared…

…the deceased hanged himself during a fit of temporary insanity brought on by anxiety about his property, and the habit of excessive drinking of intoxicating liquors.

A few days later three policemen were charged with assault upon Mr and Mrs Lyons and two others of damaging their property. Only Matthew’s colleague, HOLMES, was found guilty of assaulting Mary Lyons and was fined £2 plus costs. Matthew may well have been discharged with all the other defendants.

Only three months earlier, Matthew had witnessed the marriage of his eldest daughter, Christiana Matilda. He didn’t get to see the arrival of Joseph Edmund ELAND, his first grandchild, or to mourn the deaths of Christiana and her newborn fourth child a few years later. And, between these sweet and bitter events, his fourth daughter, Emily, died in Filey, aged 20. She is buried in St Oswald’s churchyard.

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Find Matthew on FamilySearch Tree.

An Odd Couple

I don’t have the figures, but I don’t think it was unusual for women in Victorian Britain to be pregnant on their wedding day. (Those that weren’t may have been breastfeeding.)

When Ann TEMPLE married for the first time in 1875 she was 34 years old, the mother of five children and probably pregnant. I haven’t been able to find a birth registration for her sixth child, Ellen (or for her third, Mary Ann), but she would give birth in marriage to two more.

The father of all her children was almost certainly James BULMER, the eldest son of Graves Bulmer and Ann Hudson (post Horse Trading last Sunday).

In 1861, James was 26-years-old and unmarried, farming 120 acres at Reighton, near Filey, and employing 4 servants, one of whom was Ann, his housekeeper.

Ten years later, still at Moor Farm, Ann has three children bearing her name, aged 6 down to two and she continues to be a servant to unmarried James. (A fourth child, John her eldest, was away on Census night.)

William came along in 1872 and three years later James and Ann decided to wed.

Filey Genealogy & Connections has given both of them a previous spouse but the marriage register (via Find My Past) clearly shows their single status.

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The family seems to have moved to Filey before the wedding and in 1881 they are all together in Queen Street. Eighth and last child, Hannah, was born in 1884. The five children who had previously gone by “Temple” have all taken the Bulmer name, though it seems unlikely they were formally adopted.

As indicated above, two of the children may not have been registered at all, and none, as far as I can tell, was baptised. The scarcity of sources and the name changes have meant the family’s representation on FamilySearch Tree has been minimal. I have put Ann’s first five children on the World Tree with an “unknown spouse”, but acknowledging James’ probable paternity in notes. I had to create records for several children because “the system” didn’t recognize them. I created a Mary Ann TEMPLE ID but she is already on the Tree as a BULMER. I’ll do a merge later using the existing ID because it links to her husband, Thomas Henry JOHNSON, and some of her children.  There is a Johnson family headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard, broken alas.

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In loving memory of TOM HENRY, the beloved husband of MARY JOHNSON, died Feb 8th 1932, aged 65 years.

Peace, Perfect Peace

Also of the above MARY JOHNSON, died June 16th 1944 aged 78 years, also of

BEATRICE ELLEN, beloved wife of their son HENRY JOHNSON, died March 17th 1947 aged 47 years

Also of LOUISA MARY, daughter of the above T.H. AND M. JOHNSON, died August 15th 1962 aged 65 years.

Also of the above HENRY JOHNSON, died 20th February 1965 aged 70 years;

Also THOMAS GLAVES (sic), son of the above T.H. AND M. JOHNSON, killed in the Great War April 10th 1918, aged 19 years.

Today’s Image

Bland’s Cliff in Scarborough is named after the Quaker, John BLAND, who lived on the steep street at the beginning of the 19th century. I think this may be him on FamilySearch Tree. It is an intriguing Pedigree anyway, leading to far-flung places.

Reighton to Filey

Ann HAMCOAT was baptised this day 1741 at St Oswald’s, Filey. She was the fifth known child of Lewis HAMCOAT and Jane ARTLEY who had married nine years earlier at Reighton.

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I visited St Peter’s Church for the first time about three weeks ago and enjoyed a mooch around the graves. From Filey the eye is drawn to the caravan dandruff on the distant cliff top that is Reighton Sands Holiday Park. Reighton Village  away to the right seems to be hidden in trees. I was surprised, then, by the view from the north wall of the churchyard.

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The stretch of Filey Sands  by the Promenade features in Today’s Image.

There isn’t a great deal to be discovered about the HAMCOATs in the Filey Genealogy & Connections database. There is even less in FamilySearch Tree. I have neither a marriage nor a death date for Ann. Her older brother William married Margaret STAFFORD at St Oswald’s in November 1757 and they named their second daughter Ann (MJDT-2QF). She married John TINDAL (sometimes TINDALL/TINDALE) in the same church 33 years later and they christened their firstborn Ann there the following year.

C29_HAMCOATwm_20170518_fstAs is natural, deaths followed. Ann TINDAL senior in December 1815 age 55, her father William the year after age 83, her mother Margaret the year after that age 77. The old couple sleep under another of the very few flat stones in St Oswald’s churchyard. Their granddaughter Margaret HUNTLEY nee Williamson may not be with them but she is remembered (MGC1-WZ2 on FST). Her husband, Robert, was a “Captain” and I would guess a Master Mariner. One can imagine him having conversations  with  the above John, one of the ship building TINDALLs of Scarborough. (I wrote briefly about that family in Ship Owners’ Wives, 16 May 2011.)

Here is the HAMCOAT MI:- C29 in the Crimlisk/Siddle transcription, (976 page 5 in the East Yorkshire Family History version, No. 289 in their MI Transcription Series).

Sacred to the Memory of WILLIAM HAMCOAT of Filey who died Nov 30th 1816 aged 83

Also to MARGARET HAMCOAT wife of the above who died May 19 1817 aged 77

Also of Margaret HUNTLEY widow of Capt. ROBERT HUNTLEY of Scarboro’ the granddaughter of the above who died  Mar 16th 1885 aged 88

The HAMCOATs (sometimes HAMCOURT) and the families into which they married seem to be broken up on FST so, once again, anyone interested in them should turn to Filey Genealogy & Connections first, perhaps starting with Lewis.

Baby Boomers

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Frank GRICE didn’t make it over the “trauma hump”. Nowadays the increasing probability of dying between the ages of 15 and 25 is mostly associated with accidents (young drivers killing themselves and their friends) but a check on causes of death graphs for 1891-1900, for age range 15 to 24, show it is likely that Frank succumbed to phthisis (pulmonary tuberculosis). For males in this cohort violent death is the second biggest killer. I found no news report of his accidental death in the Scarborough Mercury; there wasn’t even a death notice.

The fine stone in Filey churchyard remembers him, his parents and three siblings who died in infancy. He was eleven when Dickinson died aged about a month and fourteen when Alice departed a week after her first birthday. George William died ten years before Frank was born.

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On FamilySearch it appears that Frank was the firstborn of Richard GRICE [MGPK-XBQ] and Hannah BOWMAN [K8HF-2DR]. Not so. Kath’s Filey Genealogy & Connections has eleven children and maybe that is all of them.

Richard and Hannah have a different ID on the (Wiki) Tree for each of the children that have a baptismal record picked up by “the system”. Were the others not baptised?

I checked the births of Grice children in the Scarborough Registration District who had a mother called BOWMAN and found only five. They were not the five on FST.

The mother’s maiden name for the firstborn (George William the First) was recorded and/or transcribed as BOWMER, as was child 8, Fanny. Children 2, 3, 4 and 7 were born to mother BOOMER. Francis (Frank) was an odd child out in that his mother was a BOWMAN but his father a GRACE!

This begs the question, “Are these baby Boomers on FST?” They are not, so perhaps they were not baptised – or their baptismal record has slipped through the FST net. Kate was a BOOMER but she is on FST as a BOWMAN [MV83-2XY] though without  a christening source attached.

A month or so ago I had no idea how useful the GRO Online Index was for enabling the completion of family units. Then I happened upon Kathryn Grant’s BYU Webinar titled Finding a Woman’s Maiden Name Using the GRO Site. My research life will never be the same again.

If you are a Yorkshire Coast GRICE and are interested in expanding Richard and Hannah’s family on FST I suggest you begin by removing the parental Dupe records and then turn to Filey Genealogy & Connections for help. George William the Second married into a Filey family that will take you back further than a founding father of the Filey JENKINSON dynasty – Robert [K8H1-45C].

 

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Today’s Image (previous post) was taken from one of the nicely mown paths on the Reighton Sands Holiday Park. In less than an hour you could stroll to the base of the chalk cliffs straight ahead (except at high tide) but your route must be circuitous if you heed warning notices on the perimeter of the wooded valley. Follow the green line on the Google Earth satellite view below to get down to Speeton Sands in relative safety. The steps at the top of the cliff are steep and the slope near the bottom slippery when wet. The bit in the middle, part of the old Donkey Trod, I think, is lovely in summer. (There was a trade in coprolites for a short time in the mid-19th century and donkeys carried the fossilized poop of large sea reptiles and fishes up to the railway for onward transport to Hull.)

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