Consequences

The father of William WINSHIP (Thursday’s post) made at least one dismal life-choice in his youth.

A month later (13 July), the Halifax Guardian listed the cases that were to come before judges and jury at the Yorkshire Summer Assizes.

47. John Winship, 18, c[harged] with having, at Paull, feloniously assaulted Fanny Barchard.

On Tuesday the following week, the grand jury at the Assizes “ignored the bill” against John for the rape and so he was, I assume, allowed to return home.

He was 17 years old, not 18, and I expect all the villages dotted around the Plain of Holderness knew what he had done.  He was not driven away and stayed in the village of his birth until he married Eliza WISE in 1859. She was just nineteen. They set up home in Hull, the “big city”, and Eliza died there in 1862, possibly in childbirth. (Filey Genealogy & Connections records a daughter Emily, born 1862 in Sproatley near Hull, but I haven’t found her in the GRO Index.)

John, a fisherman, moved up the coast to Filey and on 24 July 1864 married Jane KITCHING at St Oswald’s. Two daughters were born before William. In 1871 the family was living in Church Street, Filey (and the aforementioned Emily was with them). Ten years later, Jane occupied the dwelling with her second husband, Charles BRIGHT. John had died six years earlier, aged just 42.

Shed no tears for him. What about his TWO victims? There were two girls called Fanny BARCHARD – first cousins, having the same paternal grandparents. In 1841 they were living a few miles from each other, the elder in Ellerby, the younger in Roos. At the time of the rape, one would have been 15 years old and the other fourteen. I don’t know which of the girls suffered the attentions of John Winship. The triangle made by their home villages measures about 10 miles on each side. Newspaper notices concerning the outrage offer no helpful details.

If the girls discussed the rape with each other, I imagine they were both psychologically harmed in ways that would shape their futures. It is a simplistic idea, I know, but I wondered if their approaches to marriage would indicate which one had suffered the physical assault.

Fanny the Elder was 28 years old when she married James SEAMER, a farm servant aged 30. I have not found any children.

Fanny the Younger married at 30, her husband 40 year-old widower Matthew THURLEY, a shoemaker. They appear to have been childless also.

Consequences, perhaps, but no conclusion. ( I have had a quick look for their deaths, with no success. A Fanny Seamer who died in Brighton in 1927 aged 82 is not our girl.)

Insect 24 · 5 Spot Burnet Moth

Common spotted orchid, Dactylorhiza fuchsia, Burnet moth, Zygaena trifolii, Muston Cliffs

Alice and Her Sisters

Alice COCKCROFT was one of the three widows left to “lament their bereavement” following the deaths of their husbands in November 1852. She was well practised in lamentation.

On the 29th August that year, her younger sister Esther had been laid to rest, aged 17. Ten days later, her elder sister Hannah was buried.

1852_COCKCROFTsisters_Bur

Alice’s daughter Mary was about 9 months old at this time and her niece, Sarah Ann BIELBY, had recently celebrated her first birthday. There may not have been much discussion before the bereft man and woman, each with an infant to raise, chose to live together. (They would be inseparable for about fifty years.)

The 1861 census found Alice keeping house for George Bielby and Sarah  Ann in Foxroyd Yard, Flamborough. (Mary was with grandmother Sarah Cockroft in South Street.) Ten years later the two girls, now 19, were in Front Street, Flamborough, with their “single parents”.

Mary Stephenson flew the unusual but practical nest first, in 1874, to marry William Joseph GARDINER. The couple moved to Hull and lived in Terry Street for about forty years – without the “blessing” of children.

Sarah Ann married Richard Acklam BAYES in September 1876 and had four children, three girls and a boy who would play cricket for Yorkshire.

George William Bayes, as an amateur in a summer sport, would almost certainly not have given up his job as a fish buyer, or his home in Flamborough. In 1933 he made a short film of fishermen at North Landing and “the climmers” on the headland. You can watch it here. George William was not related by blood to George Stephenson but it would be surprising if he hadn’t been told stories about his “granduncle”.

1933_GeoWmBAYES_screengrab
Screengrab from George William’s film.

I have made some connections on the FamilySearchTree that help to form a picture of the future denied to George Stephenson. I am unable to present his forebears because there are problems to be resolved.

I have found Flamborough Fishing Families to be a reliable online resource but in this instance, it doesn’t agree with FST.

FFF indicates that George’s parents are George and Mary née CHADWICK. I think this is correct.

FST marries George, son of George and Mary, to a “Mrs Stephenson”, with daughters born in 1857 and 1862. I think Mrs S is Jane DANBY, of North Frodingham. She married George there and they raised their family in Roos. Just to confuse matters further, FFF has the George who went to Roos marrying “Elizabeth”.

Of the three men who drowned in 1852, two families (Bailey and Major) have representatives buried or remembered in Filey St Oswald’s churchyard. If I find Flamborough Stephenson connections to Filey I may return to the difficulties with George senior and junior.