Choss

My dear Uncle Ron didn’t appreciate chaos but whenever he spoke of ‘choss’ (same thing) he always had a smile on his face. He’d be loving it, in England, now.

I will not dissemble with you…As an Englishman, I am always straight in my dealings. An Englishman never lies nor deceives, even for his own profit.

Henry VIII, in conversation with Eustache Chapuys, ambassador of Emperor Charles V. Bring Up The Bodies, Hilary Mantel p.125

I mentioned a few days ago that we can’t leave the European Union because our armed forces have already been co-opted by that organization. The Lisbon Treaty explains what we are expected to relinquish if we stay in the EU. In a long list:-

14: The UK loses control of its armed forces including its nuclear deterrent

You will find the full list in the comments section of today’s  UK Column NewsIf you choose to devote some time to watching this antidote to lamestream bulletins you’ll see this photo of some “hearts of oak”, taken only a week or so ago at Northwood.

heartsofoak_ukcolumn_screenshot

Note the flags. One is fringed in gold, indicating its military status.

The UK regime will find a way to nullify The People’s Vote of 2016. Before disappointed “leavers” reach for their pitchforks, they should seek out photographs of Act 10 in Paris where the brutal gendarmerie are shown piling in with batons. The peacemakers may not be French police or army but rather willing servants of tyranny from other EU member countries. Coming to an English shire near you, sometime soon perhaps.

Raise a glass. Choss.

The Murderer’s Brother

This post was intended to celebrate the birthday of John Appleby PRITCHARD, on this day 1827. Further research today revealed that this was actually the day he began his distinguished service with the Royal Navy, at the age of twelve.

If Filey Genealogy & Connections was misleading where the births of John and his father, John White Pritchard, are concerned, Kath provided an intriguing note about an explosive action in which the younger man took part. John junior was a senior officer on HMS Edinburgh at the Bombardment of Sveaborg, the most significant naval encounter of the Crimean War. It played out in this small patch of the Baltic Sea, just south of Helsinki.

1855_Sveaborg_GE

There is a detailed account of the clash between the Anglo-French Alliance and Russia here. It includes a useful plan of the disposition of the vessels involved that you can compare with the Google Earth image. I don’t know if the painter John Wilson CARMICHAEL witnessed the bombardment but his painting of it captures its incendiary nature with immediacy and power.

About seven years later, John Appleby died at sea while sailing home from Ceylon. He didn’t live to witness the shame his younger brother brought upon the family. You will find plenty of accounts of Edward William Pritchard’s crimes if you search for his name online – but maybe not the LaFredux post of 27 July 2017 – The Doctor’s Daughter.

The FamilySearch ‘system’ has put a lot of Pritchards on the World Tree but they are a mess of duplicates, waiting for a descendant or two to bring the generations together. A few erroneous dates notwithstanding, the family is more connected on FG&C.

John Appleby PRITCHARD  – on FG&Cand on FST.

A Naval Biographical Dictionary has entries for five of the seagoing family Pritchard. Start with John Appleby and then follow the forward arrows for the others.

ML.201

WATKINSONr_WW2Motor Launch 201 was one of eight such vessels in the 13th Flotilla of a Royal Navy Coastal Force based at Yarmouth during World War Two. On this day, 1941, one of its crew, Able Seaman, Robert WATKINSON, lost his life. One brief entry online records that he was “killed”. The marble block on the family grave in St Oswald’s churchyard says otherwise. I haven’t been able to determine what actually happened.

F142_WATKINSONrobt_20170602_fst

Filey Genealogy & Connections reveals an extensive pedigree, showing Robert’s descent from several of the town’s fishing families. On his father’s side a 3rd great grandfather is George JENKINSON, and on his mother’s George’s brother, Robert JENKINSON – the sons of Robert (1756-1808) and Margaret TRUCKLES.

Robert’s pedigree on FamilySearch Tree is waiting for the scattered fragments to be linked together. I have made a start.