Poor Old Horse

I didn’t have a post subject for today, so turned this morning to the FG&C Anniversary List for help. Two people with family connections to Filey were born in Scarborough this day. Caroline VAREY arrived in 1853. Her parents, Thomas Bridekirk VAREY and Caroline FLINTON were married in St Mary’s Church in September 1841.

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My first thought on seeing “Flinton” was to hope that the father of the elder Caroline was called John. On this coast, Johnny Flinton is best known for his harbour.

Caroline Varey’s grandfather Flinton was indeed called John, but my research efforts failed to connect him to Cayton Bay. At the 1841 Census he gave his occupation as “Waggoner” and ten years later, aged 73, he was still working as a Carter, and living at 13 Neptune Terrace, Sandside.

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Poor old horse. If an Albion Band tune is now playing in your head, taking you back to the 1970s, listen here.

I was pleased to find that several people have been working recently on the Varey/Flinton pedigree on FamilySearch. ­Not much for me to do.

Who is Mr. Reed?

The Crimlisk/Siddle survey of the St Oswald churchyard places a stone remembering Thomas MOSEY and his unfortunate son in Area H. My digitization of the typescript runs as follows:-

H11

To the Memory of THOMAS MOSEY, who died Jan 15th 1826, aged 49 yrs

‘In life much respected and in death much lamented’

JOHN, son of the above, who was drowned in The River Thames, Feb 5th 1819,

aged 17 years, and was interred at Mr. Reed’s Chapel                   Road, London.

The East Yorkshire Family History Society version of the Monumental Inscriptions differs slightly and inconsequentially with regard to punctuation – except where Mr. Reed is referenced.

2210

…interred at Mr. Reed’s Chapel Road. London.

Mind the gap! I don’t have the Crimlisk typescript to hand but my guess is that the name of the road – the address of the Chapel – is missing, unreadable. The Mosey stone has since disappeared.

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Some relocated and ‘H’ stones against the north wall, photographed this afternoon

The Reverend Andrew REED founded a school in London in 1813 and its current incarnation in Sandy Lane, Cobham, is an impressive institution. Just the sort of place to which a shipowner might send his child. Alas, Reverend Reed’s founding aim was

…to provide relief to destitute orphans, ‘to rescue them from the walks of vice and profligacy…

His first Orphan Asylum was a house in Shoreditch, so perhaps there isn’t a connection here to young Mosey. Tantalisingly, though, Rev. Reed became minister of New Road Chapel in 1811 following his training. It was later known as the Wycliffe Chapel and he remained in the post there until he was 74 years old (1861).

I couldn’t find a newspaper account of John’s drowning, and he doesn’t have a place yet on FamilySearch Tree. He is the third child of 15 on FG&C. All the children are given a Scarborough birthplace but there is a strong family connection to Filey. Rather touchingly, John was a first cousin once removed to Thomas Henry SUGGIT who died in 1862, aged 14, in a fall from the Carr Naze cliffs. (See LaF Redux post ‘About a Boy’, 6 October.) I hope to connect them on FST before too long.

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Townscape 11 · Scarborough

Iris grabbed her coat from a hook on the wall and hastily put it on over her nightie; she saw her new shoes under the chair, and snatched them up as her mother hurried her out of the house. They ran quickly across the road with Joey to shelter under the pier.

They were shocked by the devastation they saw along the sea front. Several buildings were burning, there were flames coming from the Castle headland, the Grand Hotel looked as if it had lost all its windows…

Thunder in the Morning, Lynne Reed

Men Overboard

On this night in 1925, Robert Haxby JOHNSON fell from the steam drifter G.E.S. and efforts by other crew to rescue him were unsuccessful. The fishing boat was 36 miles East by North of Scarborough.

Twenty-two years earlier, and about five miles from Scarborough, a sudden squall capsized the herring coble Wild Rose and it began to sink.

…Two of the crew, Thomas H. Cowling, the skipper, who is 70 years of age, and T. Holmes, had just time to scramble into their small boat before the Wild Rose went down. Jenkinson Cowling, another of the crew, swam alongside the coble, and the fourth man, John Willis, went down with the vessel. His more fortunate companions were of the opinion that he was thrown against the halyards by the lurching of the boat, and, being unable to clear himself in time, was dragged down with it…

Aberdeen Press and Journal, 4 February 1903

The three were rescued by the crew of another coble, Romeo and Juliet, which just made it into Scarborough harbour “in a sinking condition”.

Robert Haxby JOHNSON was 36 years old and is remembered on the gravestone of his maternal grandparents Richard HAXBY and Hannah née CAMMISH.

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In Loving Memory of ROBERT, the beloved husband of ELIZABETH JOHNSON, who was drowned Jan 29th 1925 aged 36 years.

Robert isn’t on FamilySearch Tree yet but his Filey Genealogy & Connections pedigree is extensive.

John married Ann Watkinson DAY in 1894 when he was 21 years old, and the couple had 5 children in their short time together. FamilySearch has three of the children but one, Harry, was fathered by Walter WILLIS, a textile worker in the West Riding. Again, FG&C is currently the more reliable source for this Willis branch pedigree.

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In Loving Memory of JOHN WILLIS, died Feb 26, 1919, aged 20 years.

Also JOHN WILLIS, father of the above, who was drowned at sea Jan 29, 1903, aged 30 years.

We shall meet again

 

The Barque ‘Unico’

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Unico came to grief on Filey Brigg this day 1871. I favour her being the “barque” of the memorial obelisk rather than the “schooner” of this vivid report of her demise in the Driffield Times, 21 January.

Wreck and Loss of 13 Lives at Filey

The Italian three-masted schooner Unico, captain Angelo Dodero, coal laden from Newcastle for Genoa, which brought up in Filey Bay on Sunday, dragged her anchors in a gale of wind, before daylight on Monday morning, and struck upon Filey Brigg, and went to pieces immediately. Of the whole crew, thirteen in number, only one man, Litano Maccouchi, was found alive upon the rocks. A Newcastle pilot was also drowned.

The Inquest

On Wednesday, an inquest was held at the Ship Inn, before J. M. Jennings, esq., coroner, on the bodies of three men cast on Filey Brigg, whose names are Gaetano Paganetti (mate), Carlo Lavaggi (able seaman), and Francesco Bugino (apprentice). From the evidence of Litano Maccouchi it appears that the vessel Unico, with a cargo of 600 tons of coal, sailed from Newcastle-upon-Tyne for Genoa, on the 11th inst., having on board Capt. Didero, a crew of 12, and a Tyne pilot named Corbett. The vessel arrived off Flambro’ Head on Saturday 14th, and being hazy, with strong wind from S.S.W. the pilot requested her to be anchored under Speeton Cliffs; this done the vessel rode safely until Monday morning, when, thick with rain, a fearful gale sprung up from S.S.E., which caused the ship to drag her anchor. The pilot at once requested sail to be made, anchor to be slipped, and stand out to sea; this was done, but in doing so the Unico struck upon the extreme end of Filey Brigg. A heavy sea was running at the time and so great was the concussion that the ship’s bottom was stove in; at this momentary crisis part of the crew got into three boats, which were on deck, the other part of the crew took refuge on the fore-rigging; no sooner done than an awful sea broke upon the ship, swept the deck, and hurled the boats into the gaping sea, thus drowning at one blow eight of the poor fellows; a twin mountain wave followed, which burst upon the ship, carrying away the foremast, upon which were the other six clinging for life, but these were also thrown amongst the breakers, which were spending their fury upon the fatal rocks, only one rose to the surface to grasp a piece of timber to which he tenaciously clung, when another wave lifted and cast him upon a safer part of the rocks; fearfully bruised and bewildered he climbed upon a higher rock, and upon this rock he sat shivering for more than an hour, when he was found by two fishermen, who carried him over rocks and to the Ship Inn, where every care and comfort was bestowed upon him.

James Gondrill, fisherman, said: I left my house on Monday morning about 7.15 a.m. and went on to the Brigg, when I met two fishermen carrying a shipwrecked man; I proceeded further on the rocks and espied another one of whose hands was uplifted firmly grasping some seed weed: with assistance I lifted him up and found him cold and dead; a little further on I found another lifeless man, both of whom were taken to the Ship Inn.

The Coroner, having summed up, the jury returned a verdict of “Accidental Death.”

I think the reporter did rather better with the names of the unfortunate crew than whoever carved their names on the obelisk in St Oswald’s churchyard.

Here’s the Crimlisk transcription (the names are now obscured):

This stone is erected to commemorate a fearful shipwreck which took place

on Filey Brigg on 16 Jan 1871 of the Italian barque ‘Unico’ from Genoa

whereby 12 out of a crew of 13 including an English pilot perished

 

The following are interred in Filey Churchyard

ALGELO DODERO, Captain

GAETANO PAGANETTI, Mate

CARLO LAOAGGI, Seaman

FRANCESEAS BUGINO, Apprentice

and five others (Names unknown)

The East Yorkshire Family History Society transcription helpfully adds the Burial Register entries. These indicate that one body, supposed to be that of Captain DODERO, was not found for about ten days after the event and was interred with the others on 31 January.

*1871 Jan 19. Carlo Lauggi. Wrecked. 38.

*1871 Jan 19. Gaetano Paganetti. Wrecked. 37.

*1871 Jan 19. Francesco Bugiano. Wrecked. 17 yrs.

*These 3 men were washed up on Filey Brigg, from the wrecked barque Unico.

I walked to the overlook on Carr Naze this morning to photograph the scene of the wreck for Today’s Image. I was a little disappointed not be faced with a stormy sea and bruised sky but the upside was better light in the churchyard and Queen Street to picture two other elements of the story.

Fisherman “James Gondrill” was almost certainly James GOUNDRILL, born in Keyingham in 1839. At the census of 1871 he was living with his in-laws in Mosey’s Yard, off Queen Street, and working as a Gardener. Kath gives his occupation as Fisherman in Filey Genealogy & Connections but he began his working life as a Farm Servant (1851) and ten years later was a Servant to John Rook, the Miller at Mappleton. In 1881, still working as a gardener, he was living with wife Hannah and three daughters in Scarborough. The couple would return to Filey and be laid to rest in St Oswald’s churchyard. I didn’t have a photograph of their headstone in stock, probably because it is so hard to read, being well coated in lichen.

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In loving memory of HANNAH, the dearly beloved wife of JAMES GOUNDRILL, who died April 19th 1898 aged 52 years.

For to live in Christ and to die is gain.

Also the above JAMES GOUNDRILL, who died Sep. 9th 1905, aged 66 years.

The grass withered, the flower fadeth. The word of God stands forever.

James and Hannah are on FamilySearch Tree but without their full complement of offspring and for the most part disconnected from their forebears. When I find the time I’ll attempt to bring them all together. I had a quick look at Italian records for Unico’s named crew without success. I hope Litano Maccouchi recovered from his ordeal and lived well, to a great age.

I walked the short distance to Queen Street to photograph the Ship Inn, sometime after 1871 re-named the T’awd Ship, and now a private dwelling.

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There is a fine view of the Bay at the end of the street and from Cliff Top a cargo ship was heading north beyond the Brigg. It was the Mistral, a Ro-Ro flying a Finland flag, heading for Teesport from Zeebrugge. Calm sea certainly, prosperous voyage maybe.

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Reverend B K Woodd

Basil Kilvington WOODD married Esther Harriett HOLLOND in Paddington, London, in April 1867 and their first child was born a year later. In1868 Basil accepted a curacy in Scarborough and three children were born during his ministry there. In 1873 the family made the short journey down the coast road so that Basil could serve as the Vicar of Filey.

Two WOODD girls were born in the town, Dorothy Eugenia in April 1875 and Edith Isabella in the summer of the following year.

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In January 1880 the family of eight was preparing to leave Filey. An account of two events reported in the 17th of January edition of The Scarborough Mercury show what this separation meant to the senior Woodds and the townsfolk.

FAREWELL SERMONS

On Sunday the Rev. B. K. Woodd preached two farewell sermons to his parishioners in the parish church. Towards the conclusion of the morning sermon he said his time in that parish was fast drawing to a close, and he prayed that God’s blessing might remain amongst them. In the evening the church was crowded to overflowing, and at the end of the sermon the vicar said:-My dear parishoners and friends, I beg to call your attention to the close of my ministry here to-night. Such a time cannot be referred to without a certain amount of feeling. I have not sought the new living I am going to, neither have I had any selfish motives in accepting it. If my preaching in this parish has been the means of sowing good seeds I hope they will take root and bear fruit. Many sermons have been preached within these grand old walls, that have stood for 700 years. God grant that many have been blessed by them. I go forward with this consolation, that I have tried to do my duty, and trust that you will follow me with your prayers to carry out my mission of love for which Jesus died. I trust that God’s blessing may rest with you, brightening your paths, and filling you with His heavenly love and grace until this life is over.

A few days later…

NATIONAL SUNDAY SCHOOL

A meeting was held in the School-room, on Friday evening, chiefly composed of the Sunday-school children, their parents and friends. The Rev. B. K. Woodd, the late vicar, said when he came to Filey six years ago there was no Sunday-school, but he was glad to say that so far his efforts, assisted by his wife, who had gone all over the parish seeking up the children, had been crowned with success, and he hoped that the good work they had begun would be carried forward by his successor, and that all children would attend school as usual. He thanked the many friends who had so ably assisted in the school, for if it had not been for their kind assistance his efforts would have been to no avail. Recitations, scripture passages, songs, &c., were then given by the children in capital style. Mrs. Woodd then distributed prizes to the children, according to merit, for attendance, behaviour, and intelligence. The Benediction was then pronounced by Mr. Woodd, whereupon Mr. R. Cammish ascended the platform accompanied by Mr. Harrison, and uncovered a beautiful encased clock with elaborate ornaments and also a silver ink-stand, which he said had been subscribed for by the parishioners of Filey, as a token of their esteem for the vicar and his wife. Mr. Harrison then made the presentation, remarking that during the six years Mr. Woodd had officiated at Filey he had made most praiseworthy progress in the arrangements at the church and all local matters that he had to do with. Mr. Woodd responded, saying that they had acknowledged their humble services far more than they deserved. He and his family would ever remember the kindness they had been shown to them during their short stay among them, and would value their handsome gifts as long as they lived…

A journey of about 70 miles due west took the WOODDs to Harrogate and Reverend Basil’s new living. His time as Vicar of Bilton was short. He buried his firstborn, Agnes Esther, in the churchyard of St John the Evangelist in June 1882. She was 14 years old. Two years later, ill-health forced his early retirement and the family made a longer journey, about 280 miles, to St Leonard’s on Sea, Sussex. In the summer of 1885, nine years after the birth of Edith Isabella in Filey, a sister, Gertrude Frances, made her appearance. I hope she was a great joy to her ailing father. He died aged just 43 before her first birthday.

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The Filey-born WOODD girls had very different life experiences. The elder, Dorothy Eugenia, married in 1900, had three children and died aged 84 in 1959. Edith Isabella remained single and died, aged just 30, in February 1907.

Six months later, Gertrude Frances married Thomas Walter BREEDS.

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Photographer: H. Walter Barnett, Knightsbridge, n.d.

This portrait, undated, was possibly made in her late teens. She was 22 when she married, 23 when she gave birth to her first child – and 25 when she died. Michael FRASER-ALLEN, who kindly gave me permission to share the photograph, is Gertrude’s grandson and he has put his family on Wiki Tree. I suggest you look first at the portrait of Reverend Basil and navigate to the pedigree from there.

There is a similarly extensive pedigree of the WOODDs on the FamilySearch Tree.

Note: I have taken the liberty of adjusting the tones of Gertrude’s portrait so that the image is closer in appearance to the original. Henry Walter BARNETT is, by the way, “arguably Australia’s first world-class portrait photographer”. The first subject in the collection of his photographs held by the National Portrait Gallery is Mark TWAIN. The photographer isn’t represented on FST but, not surprisingly, the writer is there – with 7th-century Y-line forebears.