What Happened to Henry?

In the May 19 post A Mystery Pearson, I mentioned my failure to find any online sources referring to Henry DUFFILL, other than the civil marriage registration in the 4th Quarter of 1874. This is slightly embroidered by a brief Scarborough Mercury notice, dated 10 October –

On the 6th inst., at Murray-street Chapel, Filey, by the Rev. Stephen Cox, Mr. Henry Duffill, of Farnhill, near Leeds, to Miss Elizabeth Ann Pearson, of Filey.

Over the last couple of days, I’ve looked for him again and come up with nothing. I have no idea when or where he was born and know only that he died between 6 October 1874 and 5 April 1891 when his 44-year-old widow, Elizabeth Ann, was enumerated at the lodging house she kept in Trafalgar Square, Scarborough. Her lone boarder, John G. Brewin, 27, is listed as a “Certificate Teacher of Elementary School”. He would marry Ruth BURROWS later in the year and be a father of two by 1901, and Headmaster of a Scarborough Board School.

20190929TrafalgarSq70_GSVIn 1911, Elizabeth was still in Trafalgar Square (at No. 70, inset) with another lone boarder, Fred WRIGHT, 24, a Coal Merchant’s I didn’t find the Headmaster on the Shared Tree, but this link will take you to Fred. The Find My Past transcription of the census entry says he was born in “Beatlerton”. I have taken this to be Brotherton, which is just down the road from Ferry Fryston – in Selby Coalfield country. I wonder if he knew anything about his 17th-century forebears on his mother’s side.

Elizabeth may have been a handsome 44-year-old, and a merry widow. I must own up to wondering if she might have, erm, had a relationship with the teacher. I have just added her dates to the Shared Tree, and they triggered a “blue hint” recording John Brewin as the first beneficiary of her will. Over thirty years had passed…

Henry remains a mystery. I thought he might be hiding behind mangled spellings of his name, but registrars in Hull in the 1870s seem to have had no difficulty recording the children of half a dozen or more Duffill families. I have yet to see a government source pinning a Henry Duffill to Leeds, let alone Farnhill. Anyway, I have given him an ID and one day, maybe, someone will sketch his life.

The Loss of ‘Integrity’

Some mornings I set out on my sea of data to see where the breezes take me. The storm of March 1883 blew up and I think it will take a few days to figure the human consequences. I have been this way before. Last year I introduced the son of the skipper of the yawl Integrity ­– Jacky Windy – and suggested readers go to the old Looking at Filey blog for an account of the Storm. When I provided the link to the British Library Web Archive back then it worked. About a month ago I discovered that the functionality had been compromised. Quite why the British Library summarily ended “Open Access” remains a mystery. I was promised a licence to give REDUX readers access to old stuff, but it hasn’t reached me yet. I’ll give it a few more days.

Integrity, a 33-ton yawl with a lute stern, was built by William SMITH in Scarborough in 1857. She went to Hull and was registered as H1207. Henry WYRILL bought her in 1881 and brought her back to Scarborough, registering her as SH159. Nicholas CAMMISH skippered initially but it was the unfortunate Joseph WINSHIP who went down with her and four crew in the ’83 March storm. It could have been a tragedy for two other families. Yawls sometimes took along a cook, and a boy whose main utility, it seems, was to take the blame for anything that went wrong.)

A syndicated news item named the drowned fishermen.

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“R. Wilkinson” was Horatio, a native of Sussex. (His first name was mangled into “Corattro” by a transcriber of the 1881 census.) Today, I’ll just give the link to George SCOTTER on the FamilySearch Shared Tree. The newspaper was correct in stating he had six children. There are currently nine on FST. Two died before their father drowned and one, Robert born 1877, is a cuckoo in the nest.

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In loving memory of ELIZABETH SCOTTER, who died December 9th, 1899, aged 50 years.

‘God calls on me I must attend

Death takes me from my bosom friends

He hath released me from my pain

In Heaven oh may we meet again’

Also, of GEORGE SCOTTER husband of the above, who was lost at sea March 6th, 1883, aged 37 years.

‘He’s gone the one we loved so dear

To his eternal rest

He’s gone to Heaven, we have no fear

To be forever blest’

 

Making Connections

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After gathering more information today and merging a bunch of duplicate IDs I have managed to connect the nine people on the three “family resemblance” stones to folk on the FamilySearch Shared Tree. The connections between the representatives of Foster, Harland and Spink stretched my pitiful graphic talents beyond breaking point but I’m offering a couple of illustrations anyway, in the hope of clarifying their situations.

First, the nine with their “stone names” and dates of arrival and departure.

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Now the nine with the names they were born with, and lines indicating their relationship links across the three stones.

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I have found only three children born to William FOSTER and Jane HARLAND – and there is one of them on each stone, though I perhaps haven’t made that clear in a linear fashion. The couple may have had more children because there is a gap of 13 years or so between the births of Jane and Editha Sarah Ann.

Editha waited until she was 49 years old before marrying widower Thomas Jennings KNAPTON. She was a married woman for seven years and a widow for 7 more. Two potential stepdaughters had died before she met Thomas, but a stepson, John Barry Knapton, may just have made it to his 80th birthday in 1939. He was named after his maternal grandfather, John Barry SMITH, of Osgodby Hall. Not the Osgodby near Scarborough but the one “near Thirsk”.

The three Foster children who rest eternally side by side probably lived together in their old age. In 1881 Editha was with her husband in Alma Square, Scarborough. Thomas died the following year and Editha ended her days in Filey. In 1881 William, who never married, was with widowed sister Jane in Clarence Terrace, Filey. It seems likely that Editha would have been invited to live with them. The houses are big enough.

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Clarence Terrace (now West Avenue) this morning.

Find Editha Sarah Ann on FamilySearch Tree. She may have been Thomas’ third wife. I have just noticed a duplicate record for him showing four other children by another wife named Sarah, but I can’t deal with the merge right now because the GRO Index is down for maintenance.

Death in a Cinema

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When I first saw this stone about ten years ago, I wondered what sort of SCOTT parents would name their son Adolphe. Mark and Alice actually registered him as Adolphus Louis. At the age of 34, he would marry Amy Eveline ROE as Adolphe, though later census enumerators would use the name given at his birth.

Either way, the boy’s name had, I thought, a continental flavour to it and a whiff of high class. Both notions didn’t survive my discovery yesterday that Mark, at the age of fourteen, worked as a miner in the Durham coalfield. Ten years later he was a Railway Clerk in Leeds. In 1871, six months married and living with his wife and widowed mother, he gave his occupation as Tobacco Manufacturer. His business grew and in 1881 he was employing 30 men and girls. At home in Mount Preston were Amy, three daughters and “Adolphus L”., age 6.

23BlackmanLane_GSVIt isn’t possible to determine how successful Mark’s business was. Clearly, he moved out of the working class into which he was born, and for six years he was a member of the City Council. But after a period of poor health, he died suddenly in 1904 at home in Blackman Lane, and if it is the same dwelling that you can see on Google Street View, you might think he had fallen on hard times. (Hanging out her washing is the 21st-century “lady next door”, at No.25.)

Three years earlier, 27-year-old Adolphus was living at 4, Mount Preston with his father, stepmother and half-sister Hilda, his occupation Cigar Manufacturer. (His father is still manufacturing tobacco.)

In 1911, Mark’s widow has turned 23 Blackman Lane into a boarding house. Living with her is stepdaughter Alice, 38, a Librarian, and her own daughter, Hilda, 23 and without occupation. Both young women are unmarried, as is the boarder, Margaret GRIFFIN, aged 30, working for a National Children’s Orphanage.

Four miles to the south, Adolphe Louis, now a “Traveller for Cigars and Cigarettes”, occupies a small terraced house in Beeston with Amy Eveline and their year-old son Adolphe Clarence.

I have found registrations for two more sons born to Amy, in 1912 and 1916, but I can’t find a record of her death. Perhaps she divorced Adolphe and remarried.

The headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard marks the grave of “beloved wife” Elizabeth. I haven’t found the marriage but a Death Notice in The Aberdeen Press and Journal states:-

Suddenly, on the 13th September 1937, Adolphe Louis Scott, (of L. Hirst & Son, tobacco and cigar merchants), beloved husband of Elizabeth Burnett, 17, Stanmore Street, Leeds.

The house Adolphe didn’t return to from his business travels is another small terrace property, a short walk from the Vue IMAX Cinema in Kirkstall. The name of the cinema in which Adolphe breathed his last isn’t reported but it was in Carlisle, and he was watching The Mill on the Floss. He suffered a cardiac arrest and, at the risk of seeming insensitive, I wish the newspapers had told us what was onscreen at his heart-stopping moment.

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Screenshot, ‘The Mill on the Floss’, 1936, dir. Tim Whelan.

If it was when the mill dam burst…

Adolphe left Elizabeth a “net personalty” of £1,117, which is about £60,000 in today’s money. She was 44 and had 37 more years ahead of her. I don’t know when, why or how she moved to Filey but in 1929, aged 79, Adolphe’s stepmother, Mary Elizabeth Scott, had died somewhere in Scarborough Registration District. It isn’t much of a connection, but the only one I have found.

Elizabeth’s stone has recently fallen.

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I will put an upstanding photo of the stone as a Memory on FamilySearch Tree sometime, but there’s work to be done on the SCOTT pedigree. There is just this to go on –

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The Station Master

The 1861 census for Filey Parish shows that John SIGSWORTH is stationmaster at Gristhorpe, married to Mary. He is fifty years old, his wife 39 and there are no children still at home. Given Mary’s age, it would be a simple matter to find children in the GRO Index, but I haven’t located a record of their marriage. John Sigsworth is a surprisingly common name in the area of Yorkshire around Easingwold and several men with that name married a Mary. But not this one, it seems.

A John Sigsworth born in November 1811 and baptised in Stillington could be the future station master but I am going with the John born to John and Alice née JACKSON.

“Our John” may be the 30-year-old male servant to Innkeeper Henry KIMBERLEY at Barton Hill, near Malton. Four years later the York to Scarborough railway would pass through the village, and a station built there. Maybe the romance of the railways made an impression on this John

I have failed to find the 1851 census so I can’t even hazard a guess at when John became a railway servant. But in 1861 he was here:-

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W. ARTHUR, the author of this photograph taken in 2006, 47 years after the station closed, has generously put the image into the public domain, so I have taken the liberty of making it somewhat brighter than the downloaded version. There’s a photo on Geograph offering a perspective that includes the railway line, which is still open.

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In 1871 the census enumerator found John at Gristhorpe Station still, but married to Emma, 22 years his junior and a native of Oxfordshire. (A later source gives her birthplace as the town itself.)

Mary had died on 29 June 1862 and is buried in St Oswald’s churchyard. Her stone has been moved to the north wall, by the church.

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John may have intended his passing to be recorded on the stone’s open space but Emma put paid to that idea. There’s a death registration in 1877 that fits him perfectly (aged 66) but I can’t support this with a burial record. That Emma, born in Oxford, is a widow in the 1881 census would seem to be confirmation but, rather than being 48 years old, the page image clearly shows her aged ‘67’. In 1891 she is the second wife of William SKIPSEY, a retired gardener, and a more reasonable 61-year-old. She wasn’t finished with misinforming enumerators. In 1901 she has aged considerably when compared with her husband and, rather than being 7 years his junior, is now ten years older than him. William, 80 in the census, died at the end of the year at 84 according to the GRO Index. Emma followed him into the unknown five years later, registered as 75 rather than 95!

William Skipsey has descendants on FST from his first marriage to Elizabeth ARMSTRONG. I don’t think John had any children at all. His life seems to have been uneventful, which is surprising, given his occupations. Inns see a fair bit of action and the railway has its moments. As one of John’s namesakes in the Easingwold area sadly demonstrated. He was one of the Raskelf Sigsworths. The village is just three miles from Easingwold and a John four years younger than our subject, and a railway labourer, married and raised a number of children born there to his wife Rachel WHORLTON. They named one of the boys John. About the same time in Raskelf, farmer James Sigsworth also had a son called John who worked as a potato dealer. In July 1881, a coroner’s inquest into this young man’s death, aged 32, heard that he…

 …met his father with some pigs in a cart at Brafferton. His father left there for Boroughbridge, and the deceased promised to follow. In this, however, he failed, and the last that was seen of him alive was at 10.30 on Tuesday night on the road between Helperby and Raskelf, where he passed a brickmaker named William Baines, of Raskelf, and said “Good night.” The deceased then appeared to be sober, and had on his arm an overcoat. A few hours after he was found lying on the four-foot way of the North-Eastern line, a little more than a mile from Raskelf. He was dead, and his legs were lying apart from the rest of the body more than a yard away, he being frightfully mutilated. A train had evidently passed over him…On Wednesday morning, about four o’clock, the driver of a goods train…stopped at Raskelf station and left the information that the body of a man was lying on the line about half-way between the railway bridge at Raskelf and the signal cabin. On going to the place indicated, the officials found the body of Mr. John Sigsworth, of Raskelf, potato dealer, quite dead, his legs being entirely severed from the body, which was laid in the four-foot. The body was conveyed to the house of his father, with whom he resided. The deceased had been to Helperby Feast on Tuesday, and it is believed he left that village about 11 p.m. on foot, and on crossing the railway had been run over by an express train. The deceased was not married.

Leeds Mercury, 22 July 1881

In early March 1888, another Raskelf boy called John Sigsworth died, aged twenty minutes. Life is a lottery.