What the Dickens?

1849 Seamer · Death  When I wrote about the death of Mary SUGGIT last month, I said that the Great English Novelist had been economical with the truth regarding the demise of Robert SNARR, the husband-to-be of Mary’s daughter, Elizabeth CAMMISH. I wrote about his final journey here.

1873 Filey · Birth  Elizabeth’s arrival on this day in 1865 is recorded in Filey Genealogy & Connections. The Primitive Methodist chapel baptism register is the source relied upon but I have not been able to check and verify it. Elizabeth is missing from the family in 1871, and cannot be found elsewhere on census night or in the GRO Deaths Index for the previous six years. The family looks to be settled in Church Street but ten years later Emily is a widow of 39 in Bridlington. She has recently given birth to Florence but father Henry’s death registration has eluded me. The family seems well presented on the Shared Tree and should be your starting point if you want to go searching for Elizabeth.

1884 Filey · Baptism  Ellen was the ninth of twelve children born to William RAWSON and Elizabeth Ann MAULSON. She married William Stewart IRONSIDE at Filey St Oswald’s in 1906. William had been a boy soldier, joining the army at age 14. He survived four years of the Great War and then “bought it”  shortly before peace was declared.

Brigadier General Delaforge wrote to Ellen –

It is very hard that at the eleventh hour he should have been taken from us. He was a splendid soldier who set a very fine example. He was the pride of the Division, and all are grief stricken… I am not yet in possession of detailed accounts of the event but I know that just before his death a report had come to the effect that all objectives had been gained in the attack which he was covering with his guns and so he will have died happily.

A newspaper report said that William had left a widow and two children. I have not been able to find their birth registrations but June Gill, a descendant, told me their names were Rene and Billy.  June sent me this portrait of Ellen – undated but possibly taken in the early years of her marriage to William.

Ellen married again but the relationship with Jesse BROOKSBANK did not survive. Unable to find a convincing death registration for Ellen Brooksbank, I looked for a third marriage instead. Ellen may have become Mrs Albert KING in Leeds in 1935, but this couple “disappears” thereafter. The thought occurred that Ellen left Britain. June told me (several years ago) that Ellen’s daughter Rene was killed in Hull during a Second World War air raid. After the war, her brother Edmund took “her children” to America. Billy corresponded with June’s mother for several years but after they died there was no further family contact. (Billy had five children.)

Ellen does figure on a United States document – the death certificate of her younger son. Registered at birth in 1919 as Robert Edmond Stewart Ironside, he died with the surprising moniker of Eadmund Ironside de Braganca. See a page image of the Certificate at FamilySearch. (The informant was Eadmund’s nephew, David S. Ironside – one of Billy’s sons, presumably.)

1898 Filey · Burial Harold is one of nine people remembered on the GASH family headstone. Two infants, two children and two FirstWorld War soldiers. I will put a photo of the stone on the Shared Tree soon.

Flight of Fancy 42 · Downcliffe Djinn

A Nest Full of Cuckoos

Ginny MILOW emerged in the summer of 1898. Before that year was over, her older sister, Edith Mary, died aged four. Ginny grew up an only child.

Ginny and her mother, c. 1900, courtesy Martin Douglas

On the Shared Tree, her circumstances are very different.

When Thomas Milow of Seamer filled out the 1911 census form, he declared that his wife Jane had given birth to eleven children in 23 years – and six had died.  

Richard Milow is almost certainly Tom’s brother. At the 1881 census, 6 years separate them in the Seamer household of Richard senior and Mary. Young Richard, 16, is a cordwainer’s apprentice and Tom, 22,  an agricultural labourer.

In Filey in 1911, Ginny’s father writes –

I can’t explain why he adds ten years to his age – or why a contributor to the Shared Tree gives him his brother’s children.

Landscape 151 · Primrose Valley

Two Days Later

The grave of David Barkley PINDER and his wife Mary Jane nee THOMPSON, by the west wall of St Oswald’s churchyard, is marked by a kerb and is not “photogenic”. But some random connection a few days ago triggered my interest and I needed an image to put on the FamilySearch Tree. I was delighted on Thursday to find the plot adorned with buttercups, herb robert and (I think) sweet woodruff. I wouldn’t mind sleeping eternally under this covering for a few weeks each year.

I happened to pass by the grave yesterday.

I looked on the bright sides – at least the inscriptions on the kerb were visible.

Which grave image would you choose to put as a memory on the Shared Tree?

Flower 24 · Yellow Iris

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Iris pseudacorus, Carr Naze pond.

Consequences

The father of William WINSHIP (Thursday’s post) made at least one dismal life-choice in his youth.

A month later (13 July), the Halifax Guardian listed the cases that were to come before judges and jury at the Yorkshire Summer Assizes.

47. John Winship, 18, c[harged] with having, at Paull, feloniously assaulted Fanny Barchard.

On Tuesday the following week, the grand jury at the Assizes “ignored the bill” against John for the rape and so he was, I assume, allowed to return home.

He was 17 years old, not 18, and I expect all the villages dotted around the Plain of Holderness knew what he had done.  He was not driven away and stayed in the village of his birth until he married Eliza WISE in 1859. She was just nineteen. They set up home in Hull, the “big city”, and Eliza died there in 1862, possibly in childbirth. (Filey Genealogy & Connections records a daughter Emily, born 1862 in Sproatley near Hull, but I haven’t found her in the GRO Index.)

John, a fisherman, moved up the coast to Filey and on 24 July 1864 married Jane KITCHING at St Oswald’s. Two daughters were born before William. In 1871 the family was living in Church Street, Filey (and the aforementioned Emily was with them). Ten years later, Jane occupied the dwelling with her second husband, Charles BRIGHT. John had died six years earlier, aged just 42.

Shed no tears for him. What about his TWO victims? There were two girls called Fanny BARCHARD – first cousins, having the same paternal grandparents. In 1841 they were living a few miles from each other, the elder in Ellerby, the younger in Roos. At the time of the rape, one would have been 15 years old and the other fourteen. I don’t know which of the girls suffered the attentions of John Winship. The triangle made by their home villages measures about 10 miles on each side. Newspaper notices concerning the outrage offer no helpful details.

If the girls discussed the rape with each other, I imagine they were both psychologically harmed in ways that would shape their futures. It is a simplistic idea, I know, but I wondered if their approaches to marriage would indicate which one had suffered the physical assault.

Fanny the Elder was 28 years old when she married James SEAMER, a farm servant aged 30. I have not found any children.

Fanny the Younger married at 30, her husband 40 year-old widower Matthew THURLEY, a shoemaker. They appear to have been childless also.

Consequences, perhaps, but no conclusion. ( I have had a quick look for their deaths, with no success. A Fanny Seamer who died in Brighton in 1927 aged 82 is not our girl.)

Insect 24 · 5 Spot Burnet Moth

Common spotted orchid, Dactylorhiza fuchsia, Burnet moth, Zygaena trifolii, Muston Cliffs

T. and Maria

When he signed the marriage register at St Oswald’s in 1860, Maria WATKINSON’s husband signed his name “Thomas COULTAS”. Until death parted them, the couple supplied census information five times, and on each occasion, the enumerator inscribed “Thomas” in his book.

In 1881 there were just three at home in Church Street; in 1891 five in Chapel Street – the parents and three unmarried offspring aged 24 to 29.

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2 Mitford Street this afternoon

By 1901 Thomas and Maria had moved to No.2 Mitford Street and on census night they had a house full. George, resolutely single at 38, was still under the parental roof and daughter Jane, now Mrs POSTILL, was there with infant Annie, 1. The wife of their son Thomas, Sarah Jane SELLERS was visiting (or maybe resident) with two of her children, George, 9, and Maria, 3.

Six months later, Grandma Maria was a widow. The Registrar entered her husband’s name as “John Thomas” and on the gravestone in St Oswald’s churchyard he is “John T. Coultas”.

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This monument is next to the stone remembering Maria’s parents and sister Jane. Elsewhere there are graves for a younger John Thomas and two Thomases, and several more remembering husbands of Coultas and Watkinson women. There’s a lot of work to be done! I did some merging of duplicates this morning, so these families are beginning to take shape on the Shared Tree.

Cant

An unusual name for a boy. I have been engaged in “workhouse work”, adding peripheral people to families on FamilySearch before giving those with Filey connections their headstone photographs. When Lily ALDEN married John William in 1899 she acquired two in-law Cant Candler SHEPHERDs, a brother and father. The father’s mother was Elizabeth CANDLER. Her father was born in 1785, and it seems unlikely that he was Cant the First.

It appears that Elizabeth’s younger brother, Cant, went to the United States, married Millicent Holliday, had nine children with her and died in Shipman, Illinois on 8 December 1901 aged 82 ( four days short of his 83rd birthday). There’s a photo of his gravestone here.

Four thousand miles away and four months earlier, unrelated by blood but nonetheless connected, William Edwin ALDEN, Lily’s nephew, died a year and three days after he had been baptised in St Thomas’ Church, Gristhorpe.

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In loving memory of WILLIAM EDWIN, the dearly loved child of WILLIAM AND MARY E. ALDEN of Gristhorpe, who died Aug 8th 1901, aged 13 months.

Also, MAGGIE their little child who died in infancy.

‘Suffer little children to come unto Me’

Also of WILLIAM ALDEN, dearly beloved husband of MARY E. ALDEN of Gristhorpe, died Sep 12th 1906, aged 37.

More on the Aldens tomorrow.

Election Results

I’m not sure what to make of them. My underdogs didn’t win a single seat. “UKIP is finished”. I’ve heard this a time or two today on the radio but consider it cant. (‘Hypocritical and sanctimonious talk, typically of a moral, religious, or political nature.’)

It wasn’t so long ago…

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Ship Inn Yard, 20 May 2014

A Girl Next Door

Two Filey households in 1841 had different addresses, one Church Street and the other Gofton’s Yard, but the census enumerator went from one to the other with no calls in-between. An 1851 Map shows a possible location for Gofton’s Yard.

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Five years later, on 24 June 1846, Warcup CROSIER married Ann HALL at St Oswald’s Church. The frailties of the first major census in England and Wales include the absence of marital status and family relationships and the waywardness of given ages. In this instance, the enumerator ignored instructions and gave Warcup his actual age, but rounded down Ann’s likely age of 19 to 15.

Not shown on the scrap of page image above are others in Jane Hall’s household:-

Christiana Hall, 18

John Palister, 61

Josh Redshaw, 50

Christopher Aucland, 20

John Chapman, 7

Without the family relationships, it is easy to jump to the conclusion that Jane was an unmarried mother, with Ann and Christiana being her illegitimate daughters. This would seem unlikely if she was 35 years old, as enumerated – but she was actually five years older than that. She died in November 1859 at the age of 58. At the 1851 census, she was sheltering Warcup, Ann and the couple’s first child, Jane. Joseph Redshaw was still lodging with her and John Chapman, now 17, is described as “nephew”. It appears that Ann and Christiana were Jane Hall’s nieces. In the St Oswald’s marriage register, Ann does not offer a name for her father and at the 1891 census gives her birthplace as Seamer. A Seamer baptism on 26 June 1821 fits her well; her mother’s name is given as Julia Hall.

Warcup Crosier (or CROSHER) was an apprentice to William WOODALL in 1841 and I wrote a post about his Indenture on Looking at Filey – Apprentice. He lived to a great age, long enough to fret over the deaths of young men in the first three years of the First World War.  In 1911 he was living at 29 Church Street. He hadn’t moved far in 70 years. With him were his unmarried firstborn Jane, 64, and two children of his third daughter Elizabeth Ann – Lillian Crosier and Harry Stanley STOCKDALE.

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This is the Crosier house yesterday (unless the Post Office has changed the street numbering in the last hundred years).

Warcup lived for 16 years without Ann. She died in 1891 aged 70.

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In loving memory of ANN, the beloved wife of

WARCUP CROSIER (of Filey), who died June 24th 1891, aged 70 years.

‘He giveth His beloved sleep’

Also MARY MARIA, daughter of the above who died Feb 8th 1901 aged 47 years.

‘At Rest’

Also JANE, daughter of the above, died May 12 1915, aged 68 years.

Also of the above WARCUP CROSIER who died August 15th 1917, aged 94 years.

Warcup and Ann have several IDs each on FamilySearch Tree. There’s an amount of work needed to set them straight, but if you are interested look here.

The Mystery of Robert Snarr

In my limited experience as a taphophile, it is unusual to find someone remembered on a headstone who isn’t family. Perhaps there are thousands of such people “out there”, but how many have had their story told by a great writer?

Robert SNARR died this day in 1849 and at the end of the following year, Charles Dickens published an article, The Sea-side Churchyards, in Household Words. You can read it in full at Dickens Journals Online but here is Robert’s Story:-

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What was the great man doing in Filey? I met someone at the grave by chance a year or so ago and the stranger told me that Dickens had a brother who lived not far away, in Malton. I don’t know if this is true.

The tragedy would have been fresh in the minds of local people and I suspect Dickens would have had no difficulty finding sources for the story. The reported exchange between Robert and “mother “ is such that  Dickens must surely have spoken with Mary Cammish (née SUGGIT). Other details should perhaps be challenged because they are at variance with contemporary local newspaper accounts. Robert may not have been an engineer and he may not have been journeying to Northumberland to start a new life.

What is certainly untrue is the assertion that Robert’s bloody corpse was brought back half an hour after his last words to Mary. It takes little more than five minutes to walk from the churchyard to Filey Railway Station so he could have thrown himself under the first train passing through, thus giving the Dickens version some veracity. However, Robert’s life ended near Seamer, a rail journey via Scarborough of about twelve miles.

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Why did Robert act foolishly?

I imagine he left his beloved’s grave in great distress.When he caught the train to Scarborough his intention may have been to return home to York and the bosom of his birth family, and to continue his career in the architect’s office. With the balance of his mind disturbed, maybe an idea came to him as he watched the telegraph poles zip past the carriage window. He was the seventh of ten children born to William and Elizabeth (née BLADES), aged 69 and 65 at the time of his death. I think he made his extinction look like an accident, hoping to lessen his family’s grief. The inquest jury and coroner did not, it seems, consider suicide.

We’ll never know his final thoughts, but the fact that he is with Elizabeth for eternity is wonderfully romantic.

RobtSnarrOfYork

Also ROBERT SNARR of York, who departed this life March 12th, 1849 aged 31 years.

On FamilySearch Tree:-  Robert, Elizabeth, Charles. (Beware the bogus Dickens pedigree.)

Gone For Soldiers, Almost Every One

The 1871 Census found George TAYLOR in Main Street, Seamer, a short distance away from his parents and siblings. He was 16 years old, serving an apprenticeship with Master Boot and Shoemaker John RHODES. About 250 miles away, 14-year-old Ellen TUCKER was enumerated in Philadelphia Terrace, Lambeth, with her mother Elizabeth née HARRIOTT, three sisters and a brother.

Ten years later George and Ellen were in Filey; a shoemaker and a domestic servant. Had they already met? Were they courting? They married in the spring of 1883 and brought six boys into the world. It wasn’t a good time to be a parent in a war-mongering nation.

One boy died before his first birthday, four joined Kitchener’s Army and three were killed.

 

kt_TaylorFamily4_PS
Photographer unknown, c. 1914, courtesy Keith Taylor

 

Silas, the youngest of the brothers, was the first to be killed – near Auchonvillers in the Somme region of France, on the 3rd February 1917. He was serving with the 2nd Battalion, King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry.

In the photograph, Silas is standing behind Fred. To his left are William, Herbert, and Ernest.

Herbert, the eldest, didn’t enlist. Perhaps he wanted to but was already married, with a three-year-old son at the start of the ‘Great War’. Perhaps the authorities thought four Taylor boys were enough and gave him a pass. He would live to celebrate his 90th birthday.

Ernest may also have had a stroke of luck – he was captured by the Germans. I don’t know how long he was a prisoner of war but he eventually came back home. At the beginning of the next war, aged 50, he was a salesman down in London, not far from where his mother, Ellen, had been raised. He was married to Lilian, her maiden surname not yet discovered.

The TAYLORs were not on FamilySearchTree. I had to go back to the grandfather of Herbert’s wife, Lily, to pick up an ancestral thread to which they could all be attached.

Ellen, George and their slaughtered lambs are remembered on a headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard.

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In Loving Memory of GEORGE, beloved husband of ELLEN TAYLOR, died Jan 9th 1928, aged 73.

‘He fought a good fight

He kept the faith’

Also of his wife ELLEN TAYLOR, died Jan 16th 1942, aged 85 years.

‘Re-united’

Also FRED, WILLIAM and SILAS, sons of the above who fell in action in France, 1917-1918.

 

Sudden Death in a Railway Train

The Scarborough Mercury reported on the 4th December 1885:-

On Monday morning a man named Edward Creaser (76) master tailor, Filey, died in the train while journeying from that place to Scarborough. It appears that the deceased left Filey about 8-30 that morning in the train for Scarborough. On arriving at Cayton the deceased got out with a friend to walk up and down for a while. As he seemed ill the stationmaster was communicated with, and he at once sent the train on to Scarborough, so that the man might have medical assistance. However before the train arrived at Seamer, it was found that the man was dead. It is stated that the deceased has been for some time subject to heart disease. He has been a member and officer of the Primitive Methodist Church at Filey for a long period.

Edward’s age at the various censuses suggests he was born in 1811 or 1812, in Ruston Parva. He found his wife in Filey, marrying Elizabeth NEWTON at St Oswald’s in 1836. Their first 7 children were born in Flamborough, the next in Muston and the last in Filey, in 1855. Edward was still tailoring, and training an apprentice, at the 1881 census, when he gave his age as 69. His son George, then 34, had followed his father into the trade, and daughter Ellen worked as a machinist. Later, in 1902, she is listed in a Directory as a tailor in White’s Yard, off Queen Street.

Four of the Creaser children died in infancy and only two seem to have married, George unhappily to Jane BODDY, Esther more productively with a Norfolk incomer, James HOLMAN, though four of their six children had died before 1911.

In the thirty years or so that Edward resided in Filey, he didn’t rock any boats. The brief account of his death may have been the first time his name appeared in the paper, outside of advertisements for his business.

I have been unable to trace any of his forebears with certainty but, with all those children he had generated a dozen identities, and Elizabeth a like number, on the FamilySearch Tree. Most of this (snowy) morning was spent transforming this… –

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…to this…

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I hope some Creaser descendants will find the pedigree, check my effort and extend it fore and aft.