Oh! Deer

Three mornings ago, early, I was photographing headstones in the churchyard when a roe deer ran by. I managed just one photo as she thought about jumping the end wall. Changed her mind and elegantly leaped the Ravine fence instead. I’m saying “she”, thinking about the fawn in Today’s Image. Wondering about their family history.

20180514Deer1_7m

Coble ‘Annie’

Filey Bay was a millpond this morning. Ninety-nine years ago it claimed two lives.

Three men in the coble Annie were returning from the crabbing grounds at about 10.30 am when the tideway, racing strongly round the end of Filey Brigg, tipped them over. The youngest of the three at age 27, John LANE, who had only just been demobilized, clung to the upturned boat and was rescued by Richard Cammish JENKINSON in the coble Sunstar. Matthew Jenkinson CAMMISH, 65,  and Mortimer SCALES, 42, were swept away and their bodies never found.

The drama had been watched from the shore by helpless local folk and early season visitors. Everyone’s thoughts must have turned to the loss of seven Filey men from the drifter Emulator the previous week.

Matthew isn’t represented on FamilySearch Tree but you can find his pedigree on Filey Genealogy & Connections.

G756_CAMMISHjohnwm_20170503_fst

Mortimer SCALES has a pedigree on FST that varies somewhat from FG&C. If each is carefully checked and verified they can possibly be merged without too much difficulty.

G519_ SCALESmort_20120809_fst

I haven’t yet been able to trace the rescued John LANE.

HMT ‘Cobbers’

The Royal Navy requisitioned FV Cobbers at the beginning of the Second World War and on this day 1941 she was patrolling the North Sea, a few miles east of Lowestoft. German aircraft attacked and sank her and eleven of her crew were killed. The bodies of Second Hand Leonard Herbert BEAN of Milford Haven and Seaman Albert STRANEX were not recovered and are remembered at the Royal Naval Patrol Service Memorial in Belle Vue Park, Lowestoft.

CammishJ2Among those taken home for burial was John ‘Jack’ CAMMISH, baptized in St Oswald’s on 25th October 1916 His father’s name is not recorded and, given the year, it seems his mother, Winifred, may have had a brief encounter with a soldier billeted in the town.

Jack’s War Grave marker is associated in the Crimlisk Survey with plot F72 and the East Yorkshire Family History Society, Part Three, 1835,  page 18, adds the post-1977 burials of Winifred and her husband  Thomas NEWLOVE (Jack’s stepfather).

F72_CAMMISHjack1_20170521_fst

For reasons unknown to me, the CWGC memorial has been placed about 15 grave plots away in Area E, in front of the now fallen stone remembering Margaret, Robert, and Annie Elizabeth CAMMISH. Robert, known as “Chorus”, was Jack’s second cousin 3 times removed from common ancestor John CAPPLEMAN and third cousin twice removed from William CAMMISH and Elizabeth WRIGHT.

I went along to the churchyard this morning to photograph the family headstone.

F72_CAMMISHjack2_20180303_fst

I found Winifred on FST a couple of days ago and allocated Jack a PID [LBQL-H6S]. He has a number of living descendants so I will leave the family to add wife Evelyn and make the connections to her JOHNSON family.

I discovered this afternoon that Jack’s pedigree goes way, way back.  Though he may not have known who his father was, and died an “ordinary seaman”, he has some astonishing forebears – if the information presented on FST  can be verified, that is.

“History would be a wonderful thing – if it were only true.”

Leo Tolstoy

In a couple of previous posts, I have referred to hitting a motherlode pedigree on FST, and know that once you meet an ancestor from the upper echelons of society you will soon enter the realms of kings and queens. If you are curious and have an hour to spare, start with Jack and see where following your nose takes you. It will be more enjoyable if you don’t take your skepticism along for the ride.

I don’t want to spoil the adventure by suggesting who you should look out for but, if you have missed him by the time you arrive in the Holy Land at the time of Christ, you might want to backtrack to check out “El Cid”, Jack being a warrior and all.

Quote

Flora on Snowdrops

February

…All round the ivied bank of the garden hedge the snowdrops hang their delicate heads, daring the wet and cold in their own miraculous way.

There is a mystic loveliness about the snowdrop, rising as it does from the dark and sodden earth, so pure and frail and spotless. It is everybody’s flower, beloved of all in town and country alike, for is it not the first signal of all to tell us the year has begun, and soon the spring will be here…

It is quite possible that England owes the introduction of the snowdrop to St. Francis, for although botanists have surmised its importation by the Romans, there is no proof of it; and what more natural than that some gardening friar under orders for England should take his last look round the Italian garden he was leaving and add to the selection of vegetable and pot-herb roots a few bulbs of the snowdrop, which, planted in the newly made garden of the English monastery, would serve as a memento both of the dearly loved founder of his Order and as a symbol of the pure grace and simplicity of that Lady Poverty whose servant he was?

Flora Thompson, A Country Calendar

19_20180219Snowdrops1_7m