Whimsy

1694 Filey · Birth  Ryther is a small village between Tadcaster and Selby, about fifty miles south-west of Filey. It is the birthplace of Thomas KILLINGBECK, a second great grandfather to John of that ilk whose life ended violently in Filey. Some Filey Killingbecks have London connections but, on a whim, I Googled “Killingbeck Ryther” and this was the top hit –

What larks! Birthday Thomas is one of Ellen’s older brothers. (That’s if you believe Helena Wray could have been 52 when she gave birth to her last child.)

The new ancestor discovery page has something for everyone, whether you’re looking for a fun family activity or detailed information about an ancestor’s life.

FamilySearch

On the brink, we should all grab some fun when it is offered, but you will need to have a free account at FamilySearch to follow the links on Ellen’s page. Even then, you won’t be able to navigate to the above-mentioned John. His connection back in time currently breaks at grandfather George, brother of Thomas born 1758. I will recall the anniversary of John’s death on the last day of this month but, if you can’t wait, read about his passing here.

Returning to Birthday Thomas – the records indicate he was baptised on his second day of life. Perhaps he wasn’t expected to live. Well, he married Mary FOWLER on May Day 1725 and their only child (found thus far) made the later move of some Killingbecks to Filey possible.

1804 Filey · Baptism  Rachel HOTHAM married a sailor, Robert WILLIS in 1835 when she was 31 years old. They had two children. I am not sure what happened to firstborn Sarah but in 1871 their son William was living with them in Church Stree. He was 35, single and working as a carter, but less than two months later, he married Emily GRANGER at St Oswald’s, Both couples are remembered on this headstone –

(Rachel’s younger sister, Nancy, beat her to the altar, marrying Robert Willis’s younger brother, John.)

1818 Filey · Marriage  Sally THEAKER, born in Staithes, also married a mariner at St Oswald’s but Richard RICHARDSON left her a widow in 1834 when she was just forty years old. He is buried in the churchyard, in an unmarked grave – unless Sarah is buried with him. There is plenty of room on her stone for him to be remembered.

1863 Filey · Death John RUDDOCK was also born in Staithes but before he settled in Filey he went with Commander PARRY to the Arctic.

Landscape 152 · Cleveland Way

Near Robin Hood’s Bay 54.397819, -0.480368

Mark of Man 86 · Contrail

Anniversaries

1777 Staithes · Birth  At eight days old, Mary was baptised at Hinderwell. She was twenty-nine when she became the second wife of William BULMER(46). They married in Filey, had three children and then William left Mary to experience thirty years as a widow. She is buried in St Oswald’s churchyard in an unmarked grave.

1870 Filey · Baptism  When she died at the age of thirty, her father carved a handsome stone that ensured she would be remembered. (But I don’t know the cause of her death.)

Reposing with a peaceful trust in Jesus

1831 Beverley · Marriage  Edward and Hannah’s descendants struggled to keep their line going but great-granddaughter “Louie” STENNETT married Herbert Copley MOWTHORPE in Skirlaugh and gave us local historian “Ces”. He contributed a description of The Black Hole (Hunmanby’s Lock-Up) here.

1822 Scarborough · Death Christopher was born in Bridlington but soon afterwards the family moved to Filey. Kath noted his unfortunate demise in Filey Genealogy & Connections.

On 1st March 1822, he fell into the sea whilst boarding a ship at Scarborough. He had previously fished at Filey.

I don’t think he has a place on the Shared Tree yet but I am fairly sure he belongs to this family.

1919 Filey · Burial  Jane Elizabeth Scotter née CAMMISH was only thirty-three when she died.

It seems that most “official” sources record Jane as a Cammish but I think she was widely known as Jane Sayers. Her mother, Sarah Cammish, married Edmond SAYERS a couple of years after Jane’s birth. The fact that Jane named her son Edmund Sayers Scotter suggests to me that the man who raised her was her biological father.  Here she is on FG&C –

The picture is somewhat different on the FamilySearch Shared Tree.

The inscription on her headstone reads –

In sweet remembrance of JANE ELIZABETH, the beloved wife of GEORGE SCOTTER,

who entered into rest Feb 25th 1919, aged 33 years.

‘Father in Thy gracious keeping

We now leave our loved one sleeping’

Garden of Earthly Delights

Another case of mistaken identity made me think of the FamilySearch Shared Tree as a domain where vital record sources are flowers. Many family plots are carefully and lovingly tended with beautiful floral borders. (We won’t look to see what is going on in the shrubbery.) But some gardens have unsightly and annoying weeds in them. Flowers in the wrong place.

Filey Genealogy & Connections has two boys called Robert JENKINSON, both baptised in 1819, the first in February to Thomas and Mary nee CASTLE, and the other in August to George and Mary nee SCALES. The two fathers were brothers.

A few days ago I turned to the elder Robert, to prepare for the placing of his headstone as a memory on the Shared Tree. I had done some work on the family a couple of years ago and was surprised to find that “my” Robert had been cast into outer darkness and replaced by this fellow:-

Usurper Robert has five sources attached to his record. Let us sort the weeds from the flowers. In chronological order:-

A weed
A weed
A flower
A flower
A flower

The birth of Elizabeth BARRICK was registered in Scarborough in the December Quarter of 1844. In 1841 her mother may have been enumerated twice in York as both Barrick and Barwick. A female servant, given age 20, was in two places in York on census night – in St Michael Le Belfrey and Minster Yard with Bedern. After 1851 I have found no trace of Robert and Ann Jenkinson. “Builay” is not a recognizable Yorkshire place name but a couple of sources give a glimpse of young Robert in the Doncaster area. There is an outside chance that “Builay” is Bawtry. I have not found the registration of his death in Durham.

The parish marriage register entry names the fathers of “Filey Robert” and Elizabeth Cole.

And here is the headstone remembering Robert, Elizabeth, and six children of their children.

In memory of MARY ELIZABETH JENKINSON, daughter of ROBERT and ELIZABETH JENKINSON, who died February 25th 1850, aged 2 years.

Also of five of their children, ABRAHAM, JANE, MARY ANN, ROBERT, and THOMAS, who died in infancy.

‘These lovely buds so young and fair

Called hence by early doom

Just came to show how sweet such flowers

In Paradise would bloom’

Also the above ELIZABETH JENKINSON the beloved wife of ROBERT JENKINSON

who died Oct 20th 1900 aged 79 years.

‘Died in peace’

Also of the above ROBERT JENKINSON, who died March 12th 1904, aged 86 years.

‘His end was peace’

Townscape 71 · Food Fair

Crescent Gardens

The Grapes of Death

In the spring of 1861 the SAYERS household in Ocean Place, Filey must have been quite lively. William, a 46-year-old fisherman, had conspired with his wife Susannah née CAPPLEMAN, to bring thirteen children into the world and the ten survivors were all still at home. The eldest, William junior, was 24 and the youngest, Robert Edmond, had been baptised just a couple of months before the census was taken. And yet there was still room for 86 year-old widow, Jane Cappleman née WEBSTER, Susannah’s mother – and grandmother of Ann Cappleman, who married one of the contentious William Jenkinsons of an earlier post.

Five years passed and widow Jane was still able to get out and about. But on a December day in Queen Street, her life came to a sudden end.

1865_CAPPLEMANneeWebster_NEWS

The hatches still stretch almost the full breadth of the footpath. I photographed them this morning.

Grapes_20181118

Mr ROBINSON, the publican, was Francis, born 1835 in Filey, married to Mary COVERLEY. The couple had just one child in 1865 but three more followed. The birthplace of all four children is given as Sawden (or Sawdon) in Filey Genealogy & Connections, which suggests the family left the town soon after the sad accident. However, when Francis died in 1880 he was buried in St Oswald’s churchyard and is remembered on the headstone of his parents.

G370_ROBINSONthofoster_20120802_fst

He has a place on the FamilySearch Tree but awaits his wife and children.

With Parry to the Arctic

JohRUDDOCK_ParryVoyage2A gathering of  Filey folk 158 years ago demonstrated the esteem the town had for John RUDDOCK. They were most appreciative of his efforts for the Lifeboat Service and his support for the Harbour of Refuge scheme, but a newspaper report of the event didn’t mention his two adventures in the frozen North with Commander PARRY. I like to think he may be one of the men shown playing cricket on the ice, him being a Yorkshireman and all. (Inset picture: HMS Fury and Hecla in winter quarters near Igloolik,1822-23. Frontispiece to vol. 1 of Parry’s account, ‘Journal of a second voyage for the discovery of a North-West Passage…’ [BL: G.7394]; see Farthest North Cricket and other Arctic sports).

I wrote about John in a Looking at Filey post – Arctic Dreams. He married widow Mary Ann Dunn née RICHARDSON when he was 32 years old and the couple doesn’t appear to have had any children. They have limited pedigrees on Filey Genealogy & Connections and the FamilySearch tree.