Who is Mr. Reed?

The Crimlisk/Siddle survey of the St Oswald churchyard places a stone remembering Thomas MOSEY and his unfortunate son in Area H. My digitization of the typescript runs as follows:-

H11

To the Memory of THOMAS MOSEY, who died Jan 15th 1826, aged 49 yrs

‘In life much respected and in death much lamented’

JOHN, son of the above, who was drowned in The River Thames, Feb 5th 1819,

aged 17 years, and was interred at Mr. Reed’s Chapel                   Road, London.

The East Yorkshire Family History Society version of the Monumental Inscriptions differs slightly and inconsequentially with regard to punctuation – except where Mr. Reed is referenced.

2210

…interred at Mr. Reed’s Chapel Road. London.

Mind the gap! I don’t have the Crimlisk typescript to hand but my guess is that the name of the road – the address of the Chapel – is missing, unreadable. The Mosey stone has since disappeared.

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Some relocated and ‘H’ stones against the north wall, photographed this afternoon

The Reverend Andrew REED founded a school in London in 1813 and its current incarnation in Sandy Lane, Cobham, is an impressive institution. Just the sort of place to which a shipowner might send his child. Alas, Reverend Reed’s founding aim was

…to provide relief to destitute orphans, ‘to rescue them from the walks of vice and profligacy…

His first Orphan Asylum was a house in Shoreditch, so perhaps there isn’t a connection here to young Mosey. Tantalisingly, though, Rev. Reed became minister of New Road Chapel in 1811 following his training. It was later known as the Wycliffe Chapel and he remained in the post there until he was 74 years old (1861).

I couldn’t find a newspaper account of John’s drowning, and he doesn’t have a place yet on FamilySearch Tree. He is the third child of 15 on FG&C. All the children are given a Scarborough birthplace but there is a strong family connection to Filey. Rather touchingly, John was a first cousin once removed to Thomas Henry SUGGIT who died in 1862, aged 14, in a fall from the Carr Naze cliffs. (See LaF Redux post ‘About a Boy’, 6 October.) I hope to connect them on FST before too long.

About a Boy

SuggitWindow2The SUGGIT window in St Oswald’s Church, Filey, is dedicated to Thomas Suggit, his wife Zillah née AGAR, and their son Thomas Henry. (You can see a photograph of the complete window on Geograph.)

Young Thomas had three older sisters, Zillah Agar,  Jane, and Harriet. One of them had an aquarium and 155 years ago the lad went onto Filey Brigg to get “some objects” to put in it. His 15th birthday was approaching – and he was about to leave Filey to study civil engineering.

He seems to have been remarkably diligent in his search for things animal, vegetable, and mineral that would enhance the aquarium. He left the house at 11 in the morning and, without distractions, he would have reached the end of the Brigg within thirty minutes. Circumstantial evidence suggests his life ended at 3.30 pm and his body was discovered half an hour after that.

1862_ThomasHenryFallFromCliffs_news

This account says nothing about the tide. He would only have had to ascend the cliffs if the waves had blocked the path at Agony Point.  The description of the cliff as “sloping” suggests he was scrambling up the south side of Carr Naze but if that was the case his perpendicular fall to the rocks would have been about ten feet, not forty.  Fishermen now climb up and down the cliffs at the Back o’ the Brigg all the time with the aid of a ladder or two but, whether or not these aids existed in 1862, it wasn’t sensible for the encumbered boy to make his way home that way.

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After a dull start, this morning turned bright and breezy and this was the view from Wool Dale Cliffs. Brigg Corner is bottom right and Agony Point is about halfway to the end of Carr Naze. Beyond Agony Point the cliffs slope fairly gently and are covered in vegetation. Climbing them would not be considered dangerous or foolhardy, then or now.

Nobody witnessed his fall and the ending of his “great promise”.

Filey Genealogy & Connections.

FamilySearch Tree.

Witness

Wharton SMITH was baptized at St. Oswald’s, Filey on this day 1879. The eighth child of Robert Smith and Zillah Agar SUGGIT he went to South Africa and became a farmer.  Robert had moved from Hunmanby to farm at Church Cliff and when he died in 1890 his second son, Tom, became “master”.  In 1897 Tom employed a “quiet steady lad” of about twenty called Edwin JOHNSON as a foreman. He worked well until harvest time the following year and one day refused to work as instructed. He asked to be paid off, went to Scarborough, bought a revolver and the next evening returned to Church Cliff and fired a shot at farm labourer Matthew Milner who, he claimed, had taken his job. As this “shooting incident” began to unfold Wharton confronted the gunman who said to him, “You needn’t be frightened; it’s not you I’m going to hurt.” Wharton, who was described in newspaper reports as a draper, ran to fetch the police. He returned with P.C. WILES who asked Johnson, “What is the matter?” Edwin, said, “What do you want? It is all right,” lifted his arm, put the barrel to his own head and pulled the trigger.

FamilySearch Tree suggests that Edwin died about 1900 but a couple of records I have found today suggest he lived to the age of 91. He carried the bullet around in his head all that time but kept the sight in one eye that enabled him to work as an agricultural labourer for most of his life. The judge, convinced he would go blind, passed a merciful sentence at trial, binding him over in the sum of £10 to be of good behavior and to “come up for judgment if called upon”.

kwss_22_WhartonSmith79_Wharton, two years younger than the unfortunate Edwin, isn’t readily found on FST. I gave his father a wife a few weeks ago and will put the children on the Tree tomorrow. Before he departed for South Africa, Wharton was photographed at the Studio of E. STEAD in Aberdeen Walk, rather neatly turned out as you would expect of a draper’s assistant. He married Christine DREYER and three children were born in SA, all with Agar as a middle name. The Agar/Smith/Suggits are well represented on FG&C and I have a number of photographs kindly donated to LaF by James Suggit and anonymous family members via Kath (Gomersall) Wilkie which I will share in the coming months. Below is a picture of Wharton in his later years.

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Update 28 August

I added the children of Robert SMITH and Zillah Agar SUGGIT to FamilySearch tree today, plus the photo of young Wharton and a photo of the headstone remembering Robert, his wife and three of their daughters. The FST ‘system’ offered a hint which proved to be a record of Wharton’s death in Bloemfontein in 1975.

This morning I photographed Church Cliff House, formerly the Smith’s home, and made it ‘Today’s Image’.

Freunds Reunited

On this day in 1820 Caroline, daughter of George FREUND and Sarah BROWNE, was baptized in St Mary’s, Whitechapel. Forty eight years later her nephew, George John FREUND married Harriett SUGGIT in Scarborough, thereby connecting her established Metropolitan family with Filey, a small Yorkshire fishing community and “watering place”.

Kath’s Filey Genealogy & Connections has about 17 FREUNDS on it and, partly because of the propensity to call most of the boys George John or John George, her pedigree stumbles once or twice. After spending several hours on the family I have made an executive decision to cast one spouse into outer darkness (Ann KEMP, replacing her with Mary ROHRS) and putting a big question mark against another (Harriet MILNER), though she doesn’t seem totally “wrong”.

FST has the marriage of George John [M94L-DZF] and Mary [M94L-DZ1] but no children. The GRO Index offered me two of Mary’s children, George John born 1839 and Caroline Mary the following year (mother’s maiden name “ROLERS”).

The FamilySearch Tree “system” generates many families in baptism size chunks yielding a bunch of dupe IDs for each parent. So if you have lots of FREUNDS I don’t envy you the merging that must be done to bring the families together.

For a stranger it is an interesting family. In the research I’ve done so far I haven’t found any that were born in Germany. At the 1901 Census the George John who married the Filey girl was described as “Chancellor Imperial German Consulate”. In 1911, aged 72 he was a man of “Private Means”. He died in Lewisham about May 1916 but there is a curious document on Find My Past that records another George John FREUND as a “Prisoner of War (Germany)” two months later. There is a suggestion that he was the Executor of his father’s will. G J Senior had shares in the Great Western Railway and his net worth was assessed at £38,732 in September 1916 (£3,657,627 now, calculated here). George and Harriet’s son was born in 1874 and married Margaret BURR late in life. He is unlikely to have gone to war. A George FREUND, Service number 206290, served in the Northumberland Fusiliers between 1914 and 1920 but his age isn’t given on the Medal Index Cards Transcription on Find My Past.

If anyone reading this does have FREUNDS in the family I’d be happy to share today’s research with you.

Today’s image (previous post) prompted me to take the first bus out to Reighton this morning where I photographed some of the gravestones in the churchyard before walking back to Filey along the beach. I snapped this view of Speeton Cliffs from Sands Road. Mark or Measure?

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