Applebys

Yesterday was the anniversary of the baptism of William APPLEBY in 1841. There are about a hundred Applebys in Filey Genealogy & Connections and William, son of James and Ann née TAYLOR, is one of six born in Hunmanby. When I began to round up his siblings on the FamilySearch Tree I hoped to connect them to the “Filey Applebys” but found instead that all seem to have steered clear of this place. I was happy to put in the work, though, because the family took me to a place I knew as a child.

William’s father was a corn miller and the birthplaces of his ten children marked his life journey. Second-born Mary Elizabeth in Buckton, the next four in Mappleton, Emma and Eliza in Skirlaugh and the last two in Patrington.

My parents married in the summer of 1940 and when the war was over they lived for a while in a caravan at Woodmansey, near Beverley. Some years after they acquired a proper roof over their heads (and mine) the caravan was transported to Mill Farm, Mappleton. There must have been twenty or more other caravans of unconventional design and construction there, with “regulars” and ephemerals minding their own business or gathering on fine evenings for games of cricket or rounders on the field or down on the beach. I struggle now to remember what happened yesterday but chasing after Applebys brought back so many vivid and happy memories of my summers between the ages of five and twelve.

Mappleton

I remember wandering around All Saints churchyard at dusk and perhaps walked by the grave of Ellen Appleby, who had died 98 years, almost to the day, before I was born.

Ten children equal lots of merging on FST and I didn’t manage to make this Appleby family presentable yesterday. I have not married off any of the children yet, nor “killed off” their parents. There are 22 Filey-born Applebys in FG&C and I expect James the Miller will be related to some of them.

A James Appleby, born in Hunmanby about the same time as “anniversary” William, traded as a Tobacconist in Filey for over twenty years but if the family name is remembered today it will most likely be linked to Appleby’s Farm, where George COLLEY’s horses were stabled. They hauled the cobles down to the waves and back to the landing with their catch. The farm was situated where the Providence Place houses and flats are now.

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Photographed this morning.

 

Pierrot

Andie CAINE died 76 years ago today. Born Ernest TAYLOR in 1867 he seems to have had a tough childhood. At the 1881 Census, he was one of around 140 “inmates”  at the Bisley Farm School in Surrey. There’s a photograph of some of his contemporaries on Rootsweb.

He came through to bring joy to countless people in Music Halls and on seaside promenades with his Pierrots.  In a Theatre Notebook article titled Pierrots Perfected: Louis Rihll and Artistic Developments in Concert Party Entertainment on the London and Provincial Stage, 1900-1930, Bernard Ince writes –

Among the estimated thousand or more concert parties that have existed in the British Isles since the 1890s, some achieving fame in a local or regional context (those of Edwin Adeler, Will Catlin and Andie Caine being of particular note)…

There is a short life sketch of Andie on the Arthur Lloyd website and a post on Looking at Filey: The Entertainer.

He surely deserves to be represented on the FamilySearch Tree but I can’t find him there. His wife, Lena, has been put on by “the System” and I will add some sources in the next few days. At the 1939 Census, Lena took three years off her age but the registration of her death and the headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard suggest strongly that this is Andie’s Lena. (Her mother’s maiden surname is MORRIS.)

F158_CAINEandie_20170430_fst

Note the Pierrot hat at the base of the stone and check out recently living examples on the heads of The Pierrotters.

The Doctor’s Daughter

Elizabeth Mary PRITCHARD was born this day 1860 in East Kirk Parish, Edinburgh. She had five older siblings who had entered the world in Hunmanby or Filey. One sister, Zillah Catherine, hadn’t survived infancy but at the 1861 census, four of the children were with their parents in Berkeley Terrace, Glasgow while the eldest girl Jane Frances, age 9, was at the home of her maternal grandparents in Newington, Midlothian. Michael Taylor was a silk merchant and judging from Google Street View owning a property in Minto Street today shows that you are “comfortable”.

Edward William PRITCHARD informed the enumerator in 1861 that he was an “MD University of Erlangen (General Practitioner)”. As a young man he had acquitted himself well as a navy doctor but after winning the hand of Mary Jane TAYLOR while serving on HMS Hecate he decided to resign his commission and enter general practice. His qualification from Erlangen was purchased rather than earned but it must have impressed the folk at the Bridlington Union because he was employed as the medical officer to the No. 3 District based at Hunmanby. The family lived there for some years but later moved to Rutland Street, Filey. A Glasgow Morning Journal report in July 1865 had this to say about the bad doctor:-

Those who knew Dr Pritchard in Filey say that he left that place with an indifferent reputation – that he was fluent, plausible, licentious, politely impudent and singularly untruthful. With regard to the last named characteristic, one who knew him intimately states that he was “the prettiest liar” he had ever known. In Filey as well as Hunmanby his lascivious disposition, manifested in some disgraceful amours, as well as his untruthfulness, became so notorious that all confidence in him as a professional man was destroyed. It may, therefore, be supposed that when he left Filey in 1859 it was because Yorkshire was too hot to hold him.

Glasgow society soon realized that “a perfect Baron Munchausen” had appeared in their midst. When the Pritchard’s servant girl died in a bedroom fire at their house he came under suspicion. Sometime later, on the 21st March 1865, gossip flew that “a medical gentleman belonging to Glasgow” had been apprehended following the death of his wife by poisoning and Dr Pritchard’s name was common currency before he was formally charged. Investigations proved that he had killed his mother-in-law too. He was tried and the day after his youngest daughter Elizabeth Mary turned five he was hanged in Glasgow, watched by 100,000 people according to one estimate.

What became of the murderer’s children? Horatio Michael married Amelia Rebecca MILLMAN in 1887 and they had at least one child, Violet Eola Robertson who married Edward Atherstone WALMISLEY in 1912. William Kenneth married Gertrude Hannah CREESER in 1904. But Jane Frances, Charles Edward and birthday girl Elizabeth Mary seem to have kept the lowest of profiles.

Filey Genealogy & Connections can give you a substantial cast of PRITCHARD characters – and Kath supplies several notes relating to the Doctor’s crimes but, as I write this the Search engine is playing silly beggars so I can’t give a link.  On FamilySearch Tree the Pritchard clan is all over the place. Here is Elizabeth Mary on FST:-

PRITCHARDelizmary_screenshot

The last four lines of  A Lament for Dr Pritchard’s Children:-

Oh think of his orphans you kind hearted people,

And I hope there is none that so heartless will be,

As point with the finger of scorn towards them,

And say that their father he died on a tree.

PritchardLament

And here is Elizabeth Mary sitting on her mother’s knee in the Cramb Brothers studio portrait of the doctor and his family, Glasgow 1861.

1861_PRITCHARDfamily_crambbros