Frederick II and Prince Eugene

William LORRIMAN and Sarah BUCKLE named their third son Frederick but the little chap only just reached his first birthday. So, four years later, they named their fifth son Frederick. At the turn of the century, Fred faced a portrait studio’s camera and sent a number of the resulting cartes-de-visite to relatives, of which at least one survives.

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Photographer unknown, courtesy Brenda Pritchard

As a young man, he seems to have chosen to become a career sailor in the Royal Navy, retiring, owing to ill-health, near the end of the First World War. One of the sources offering information about his service says he died “of disease”. There is no indication that he succumbed to the Influenza Pandemic, which didn’t really get a hold in continental Europe until shortly after his death. Fred is buried in Gillingham, not far from the family home in Chatham.

Grave of Frederick Lorriman_s

Frederick’s final posting had been to HMS Prince Eugene, a Lord Clive Class Monitor launched in 1915.

Mary Rebecca married again about nine years after Fred’s death, when their daughter Ivy would have been 19, and died aged 72 in 1953.

Find Fred on FamilySearch Tree.

 

 

Halifax or Lancaster?

Yesterday was the anniversary of the death of Sgt W. E. L. HARRISON.

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William was in the RAFVR when he was killed. One online source has a photograph of him (giving his second name as Edward) and states in part:-

…the unit was equipped with Halifax bombers, one of the mainstay bombers within the R.A.F. at the time.

Unfortunately, during one particular training flight Billy’s Halifax was seen to lose control and the bomber crashed.  Harrison died of the wounds he received in the crash and his body was interred in St. Oswald’s cemetery just over a week later.

Another source offers “Edmund” rather than Edward but, more importantly, says he was the bomb aimer aboard a Lancaster.

Both sources agree on his service number – and his prowess on the football field. He played semi-professionally for Bradford Park Avenue FC. I thought that the CWGC website might offer a definitive casting vote but the information there is sketchy. It reckons Edmund was his middle name, but the St Oswald’s burial register gives Edward. (His birth registration has “William E. L.”).

William isn’t on the FamilySearch Tree but his great-grandmother, Eleanor AUTON, offers a starting point to build upon.

Today’s Image

The official record of the deaths of Port Hunter’s crew gives Geoffrey Bradley’s last address as 16 West Avenue, Filey. (Wednesday’s post.) If the numbering hasn’t changed since the Second World War, the space where this dwelling should be is occupied by Thornton House. With its three gables and sunny appearance, it makes me smile whenever I walk past. It is very clearly a one-off in architectural terms, and may well be the fanciful creation of a capable small town builder.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERASamuel Bradley was such a man. He appears in a number of newspaper court reports seeking restitution for non-payment, mostly for minor debts relating to materials used, but one customer defaulted on a house that Samuel built in Lincolnshire.

The birth of his first son with Harriet Smith was registered in that county and Geoffrey’s, three years later, in Scarborough. Perhaps Thornton House (at left in the photo) was a fresh-start project for his second family.

Private Abbott

AbbottGAThe first name on the Filey War Memorial seems to be a mistake. A search on the CWGC website brings a George Alfred, Manchester Regiment, and a gunner with the initials G A who served in the South African Field Artillery. I think the initials should be ‘E A’.

Private Ernest Alfred ABBOTT enlisted in the Huntingdonshire Cyclists when the battalion was formed. Posted to Filey early in 1915, he courted local girl Mary Ann STORK and the couple married on 11th December 1915 at St Oswald’s.

When the Hunts Cyclists were disbanded in 1916 he was transferred to the 683rd Agricultural Company, Army Labour Corps (Service No. 434613). He died in Cambridge Easton General Hospital on 18th November 1918, a week after the Armistice. The exact cause of his death is not known. He is buried in St Oswald’s churchyard.

Dan Eaton, In Flanders Fields…The men of Filey who fought and died during the Great War for Civilization (1914 – 1919)

His birth registration, though, gives his name as Arthur Ernest, and for some records of his short life he omitted the middle name and just answered to Ernest.

When I looked him up on Lives of the First World War, two people were remembering him. A photograph of his headstone has been added but there isn’t much detail about his life.

Filey Genealogy & Connections has very little about Ernest’s origins, and Mary Ann was illegitimate so her pedigree is difficult to research. FamilySearch Tree was more helpful, providing a start with his birth family – a father and eight siblings. The mother was given as “Ann M. ABBOTT” but the GRO quickly supplied her birth name – GAVINS – and four more children. Ernest was the youngest, then, of thirteen. Ernest’s father and eldest brother had the middle name “FAVELL” and it was no surprise that this proved to be the maiden surname of his paternal grandmother.

Most of these Abbotts and their spouses were landed peasantry from a small area of Huntingdonshire. Initially, I had the notion that it had taken a war to push Ernest out of his family heartland but research unearthed an earlier migration of some Abbotts to Yorkshire. Ernest’s Aunt Rebecca married agricultural labourer Joseph ROBINSON in Alconbury cum Weston in the mid-1850s,  and the childless couple moved to the Howden area of East Yorkshire sometime between 1871 and 1881. They both died in 1910 before Ernest was sent to Filey with the Hunts Cyclists. Rebecca departed first, in July, and was buried in Howden. Joseph, in his mid-seventies, had no family to care for him and was dispatched to the workhouse where he died before the year was out.

After Ernest’s death, Mary Ann didn’t fare well. Their only child was two years old and another boy was born in late 1919. Life must have been a great struggle for her and she died in the North Riding Asylum in York in 1924. The Borthwick Institute in York probably has details of her last weeks or months there, and maybe a photograph. I hope she wasn’t certified as a lunatic – and that the Abbott boys did well after their difficult start in life.

On Another Coast

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© David Dixon shared under Creative Commons CC BY-SA 2.0 licence

These two cast iron iterations of Antony Gormley’s body gazed across the Elbe estuary for a while and now look from Brighton le Sands over the Crosby Channel towards North Wales.

In these waters 77 years ago, HMT Relonzo struck a mine and was sunk. There is a photograph of the vessel and a list of the nineteen crew at Wreck Site. The trawler went down near C10 Red Buoy and it seems that all the men aboard were lost. Relonzo had taken part in the Dunkirk evacuation the previous summer and in 1941 was engaged in The Battle of the Atlantic.

Frank HUNTER was one of the seamen who died on Relonzo.He was born in Hull in December 1908 to Filey-born parents George William and Elizabeth Ann née PEARSON. His memorial is in St Oswald’s churchyard and the stone also remembers his wife Lillian.

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Lillian was also born a PEARSON but I haven’t been able to determine her parentage. The following brief item appeared in The Driffield Times on 25th July 1941.

Filey Man Killed

Mrs. Hunter, of Ebenezer House, Queen Street, Filey, has received word that her husband, Frank Hunter (32), has been killed by enemy action at sea. He leaves three children.

The record for one of the children is “closed” on the 1939 Register and so may still be alive. I added Frank and his siblings to FST today but will leave it to his family to enter more recent information.

Friending Private Jarvis

We are all alone, born alone, die alone, and—in spite of True Romance magazines—we shall all someday look back on our lives and see that, in spite of our company, we were alone the whole way. I do not say lonely—at least, not all the time—but essentially, and finally, alone. This is what makes your self-respect so important, and I don’t see how you can respect yourself if you must look in the hearts and minds of others for your happiness.

Hunter S. Thompson, The Proud Highway: Saga of a Desperate Southern Gentleman, 1955-1967

William Isaac David JARVIS is not alone in St Oswald’s churchyard. He is one of eight servicemen in two short rows. They are all ”strangers” to the town and it seems appropriate that they are neighbours to nine of the crew of the Italian barque Unico, wrecked on Filey Brigg in January 1871. You can see their small obelisk beyond William’s stone in the photo below.

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In the summer of 1940, the 1st Battalion Royal Berkshires formed part of the British Expeditionary Force’s 6th Brigade in the Battle for France. Dan Eaton on Angel Fire confirmed a hunch that William must have experienced the horrors of Dunkirk.

The only casualty to die whilst recuperating in Filey, William died on Thursday 24th October 1940 at the Ackworth Hotel on Filey Promenade.  The coroner recorded that the cause of his death was due to a rifle bullet wound to the head, but not a recently self-inflicted one.  It is most likely that these wounds were received shortly before or around the time of the Dunkirk evacuations, as these were only three months earlier.

William’s CWGC page is the first I’ve seen that makes no reference to his birth family and/or spouse. No date of birth is indicated but, if he was in his twenties, surely there must have been kin somewhere not too far away. (It seems a little strange that he was brought all the way from the south coast to Filey if he wasn’t known to anyone here.)

Research this afternoon did find maternal grandparents, parents, two sisters and a brother in law but the records didn’t quite hang together. More work needs to be done. If I am on the right track, though, William’s birth was registered in September 1911 in Pancras, London. His parents, Walter Charles JARVIS and Lucy LOVELL married in the last quarter of 1898. Their first child, Maria Florence died in 1902 in her second year, There was a gap of nine years before William’s arrival. In 1913 his sister Lily Blanche was born and she married Arthur R MOONEY just before war was declared. The Census taken three weeks or so after hostilities began showed that Walter and Lucy were living in Bristol with a son (probably), born in 1918. Walter worked as a stoker in a hospital and Maurice was a furniture salesman.

If these folk were not his family, if he didn’t have any nearest and dearest, I hope William had at least one unexpected visit from an old friend. Respect, Mama – and Jan.