T. and Maria

When he signed the marriage register at St Oswald’s in 1860, Maria WATKINSON’s husband signed his name “Thomas COULTAS”. Until death parted them, the couple supplied census information five times, and on each occasion, the enumerator inscribed “Thomas” in his book.

In 1881 there were just three at home in Church Street; in 1891 five in Chapel Street – the parents and three unmarried offspring aged 24 to 29.

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2 Mitford Street this afternoon

By 1901 Thomas and Maria had moved to No.2 Mitford Street and on census night they had a house full. George, resolutely single at 38, was still under the parental roof and daughter Jane, now Mrs POSTILL, was there with infant Annie, 1. The wife of their son Thomas, Sarah Jane SELLERS was visiting (or maybe resident) with two of her children, George, 9, and Maria, 3.

Six months later, Grandma Maria was a widow. The Registrar entered her husband’s name as “John Thomas” and on the gravestone in St Oswald’s churchyard he is “John T. Coultas”.

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This monument is next to the stone remembering Maria’s parents and sister Jane. Elsewhere there are graves for a younger John Thomas and two Thomases, and several more remembering husbands of Coultas and Watkinson women. There’s a lot of work to be done! I did some merging of duplicates this morning, so these families are beginning to take shape on the Shared Tree.

Not So Plain, Jane

I noticed a detail in one source this morning that put a question mark against yesterday’s narrative that Jane WATKINSON married two WYVILL brothers.

On their entry in the St Mary, Hull, marriage register Crompton is correctly identified as a widower, and his bride as a widow but, against convention, Jane gives her maiden name WATKINSON, rather than her first married name – WYVILL. The register, alarmingly, states that her father is William COULTAS, Labourer (deceased).

The register entry for Jane’s first marriage to James Wyvill gives her father as William WATKINSON and helpfully adds the detail that he is “Sexton to Filey Parish Church”. This fits perfectly with Jane’s memorial on her father’s headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard.

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In loving memory of WILLIAM WATKINSON, for 32 years Sexton of this parish,

died 20th March 1884, aged 76 years.

‘A door keeper in the House of my God’

Also MARY wife of the above who died 13th April 1897 aged 84 years

‘Thy will be done’

Also JANE WYVILL their daughter died March 19 1930 aged 79

‘Her end was peace’

This Jane may be a second iteration – there’s a birth registration in 1848 for a Jane who may have arrived earlier. I haven’t, though, found a death record, or the birth of a second Jane in 1850 or 1851. However, there is a christening source for March 1851, and that year’s census return gives Jane’s age as “1 mo”.

In 1871 there is a census entry in Mosey’s Yard for Jane, first husband James Wyvill and their first child William, also one month old. (The little chap wouldn’t see the year out.) Nearby in Queen Street, James is recorded again with his wife Elizabeth and three children. This isn’t a transcription error – “James” is clearly written – but the children belong to Crompton Wyvill and his first wife Elizabeth Jane FELL.

Support for Jane marrying Crompton after the deaths of her James and his Elizabeth Jane is found in the 1891, 1901 and 1911 censuses. As close families would, Crompton and Jane accepted the children from those first marriages as their own, and no attempt is made by the census enumerator to indicate the mix of biological parents. On census night 1911, Jane, a widow aged 60 and working as a laundress, is with her “grandson”, 11-year-old Frank Cappleman Wheeler WYVILL. The boy’s grandmother is, of course, Elizabeth Jane Fell. Jane confirms that she had given birth to just three children, of whom one had died. That would have been William.

I can’t explain the naming of William Coultas in the Hull marriage register, mentioned above. Jane’s eldest sister Maria had married a Thomas COULTAS and the couple gave some of their children names that are found in other Watkinson families. (Example – John Clark COULTAS and John Clark WATKINSON.)  Maybe the clerk at St Mary’s had a senior moment.

Jane, Elizabeth Jane and the two Wyvill brothers don’t yet appear as they should on the Shared Tree. For now, you may have to go into the Details screens to see everyone I’ve mentioned. (Maria isn’t represented yet.)

Rachel’s Sister

Elizabeth Jane FELL was five years younger than Rachel (Saturday’s post) but, like her big sister, she married at age 24. She had six children with Crompton “Crump” WYVILL and four reached adulthood and married. One little girl died almost immediately on arrival, the other stayed for just over two years. They were both called Rachel.

Elizabeth didn’t make old bones.

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In loving memory of CROMPTON WYVILL, late Coxswain of the Filey Lifeboat, the beloved husband of JANE WYVILL, born August 28th 1843, died August 21st 1904.

‘His end was peace’

Also ELIZABETH JANE, wife of the above, born Oct 18th 1840, died May 1st 1879.

‘She sleeps in Jesus’

Also JAMES WYVILL, the beloved husband of JANE WYVILL of Filey, who was drowned from the yawl ‘Eliza’ during the severe gale on the 28th – 29th Oct 1880, aged 32 years.

‘Thy will be done’

Jane WATKINSON was 22 years old when she married had three children, all boys, before James was lost in a storm while fishing. After four years as a widow, she married James’ older brother, “Crump”. She was only 36 years old but the second marriage for them both appears to have been childless. After twenty years, Jane found herself a widow again.

[Mr. Crompton Wyville]. Who was approaching the allotted span of life, died on Sunday in a sudden manner. He went out for a walk on Sunday afternoon on the Crescent and met several friends. On returning home he was taken ill, breathed heavily, and died in a few minutes. Deceased having been medically attended, there was no necessity for an inquest, and although the end was not altogether unexpected, Mrs Wyville and family have received many expressions of condolence in the bereavement. During the time deceased was coxswain of the Filey lifeboat, several good services were rendered by the crew, and Crompton Wyville was known as a brave and fearless man. When he retired from the position about ten years ago, the Lifeboat Institution showed their appreciation of his services by presenting him with an illuminated address of thanks. His interest in the institution continued to the end, up to the time of his death he acted as collector at Filey. The Rev. A. N. Cooper, vicar, conducted the last rites.

Driffield Times 27 August 1904

Jane was 81-years-old when she died in 1930.

Find Elizabeth Jane, Jane and the Wyvill brothers on the Shared Tree.

ML.201

WATKINSONr_WW2Motor Launch 201 was one of eight such vessels in the 13th Flotilla of a Royal Navy Coastal Force based at Yarmouth during World War Two. On this day, 1941, one of its crew, Able Seaman, Robert WATKINSON, lost his life. One brief entry online records that he was “killed”. The marble block on the family grave in St Oswald’s churchyard says otherwise. I haven’t been able to determine what actually happened.

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Filey Genealogy & Connections reveals an extensive pedigree, showing Robert’s descent from several of the town’s fishing families. On his father’s side a 3rd great grandfather is George JENKINSON, and on his mother’s George’s brother, Robert JENKINSON – the sons of Robert (1756-1808) and Margaret TRUCKLES.

Robert’s pedigree on FamilySearch Tree is waiting for the scattered fragments to be linked together. I have made a start.

Birth, Marriage, Death, and Burial

1902_HAXBYjenkSIGNATURE.Jenkinson, the last of the ten children born to Richard  HAXBY and Hannah CAMMISH, arrived on this day, 1875. When he was 27, and four years married to Sarah Lizzie SCOTTER, he attended the wedding of older brother Robert and signed the register.

Robert was a 35-year-old bachelor when he married Eliza WATKINSON, (29, spinster). The couple would have three children, George William, born 1903, Richard (1905) and Elizabeth Watkinson (1907).

On the 23rd March 1911, Robert was drowned about eight miles north-east of Flamborough Head.

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Though described in this report as a motor coble, I suspect Annie was perhaps a yawl – to have carried a small boat. In the Deaths at Sea Register (from whence the eight miles distance comes), Robert is listed as “2nd Hand”. I don’t know who the boy Cammish may have been and Captain Syd’s database doesn’t offer a likely candidate for Annie. It does, however, indicate that James DOUGLAS, born 1885, had taken ownership of Contest a week before this sad event. Perhaps the other Filey fisherman James, born 1860 and Sexton at St Oswald’s in his twilight years, was the owner named above.

The funeral of Robert’s son, Richard, lost from Joan Margaret (Tuesday’s post), took place on the 23rd March 1941. A small headstone also remembers his parents and William WATKINSON, an uncle I think.

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In loving memory of RICHARD HAXBY, killed by enemy action, 20th March 1941, aged 36.

‘Love’s last gift’

Also of his parents, ROBERT, lost at sea, 23rd March 1911, aged 43.

ELIZA, died 29th July 1944, aged 72.

Also, WILLIAM WATKINSON, died 2nd Jan 1934, aged 85.

The loss of Robert is also recalled on a much grander stone.

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The “Memory” to Robert on FST has the inscription.

Wiles and Wailes

Researching family units occasionally throws up small surprises of particular types. Here are a couple from my recent efforts.

The married male head of a household in one census may have a wife with a different given name in the next. The ready assumption is that there has been a death in the family – and a second marriage.

In 1871, recently married Thomas WATKINSON is enumerated in Outhert’s Square, Filey, with wife Mary and first child Mary Jane. Ten years later this Watkinson family unit is living in Wenlock Place – Thomas, Mary and five children.

In 1891 Thomas and MARGARET are just around the corner from the previous address, with four of the five children, plus three more, and a lodger. But there hasn’t been a parent death or a second marriage.

In the record for Thomas in Filey Genealogy & Connections, Kath makes a note:

Haven’t yet worked out why his wife should be entered as Mary in familysearch.org when he married Margaret who lived until 1912.

MaryWATKINSON

This scrap of the page image is clear enough. And so is the marriage record.

Tom&Margaret_Mar

“Mary’s” age is given as 29 in 1881 and Margaret is 39 in 1891. A search for birth records yielded nothing convincing for a plain Mary, one for Margaret WILES and another for Margaret WYLES. The first Margaret’s birth was registered in Driffield and the second in Bridlington. The Margaret of the 1891 and 1911 censuses gives her birthplace as North Burton, so Bridlington it is:

WYLESmargt_Birth

Find Margaret on FamilySearch Treebut the parents are, as yet, childless. And the Mary Mystery has not been solved!

The second surprise type this week caused a gnashing of teeth. (Sorry, couldn’t resist.) Surgeon WHEELHOUSE and Agnes Caroline COWELL had four girls. One died in infancy and, I think, only first-born Caroline Agnes married. She had two sons with George Herbert ROWE. The younger, Claude Hamerton ROWE, was in his early twenties when his grandfather Claudius died but he married Marjorie Eteson WAILES two or three years after the Wheelhouse grandparents had departed for the better place.

Claude is also playing a waiting game on FamilySearch Tree. Marjorie’s grandfather, George, hasn’t brought her to the church yet, to give her away. Indeed, as I write this, she hasn’t been born to Frederic Hill WAILES and Annie Beatrice WAILES. I don’t know about you, but I always find it discombobulating when two people with the same family name marry. As happens in most such instances, this couple is not related by blood, but they make extending the pedigree back in time more awkward. I’m a dab hand at mixing up same name grandfathers.

Quite a few of the Wailes departed are resting in St Mary’s churchyardBirdforth. I’m envious. You can read about some of them here.

A Coincidence Chain

I wrote about Robert Jenkinson WATKINSON  back in August, on the anniversary of his death in 1917 on the Western Front. Eight months before his birth, his father had been lost at sea off St Abbs Head, about 140 miles north of Filey. That family tragedy happened 126 years ago today.

Looking more closely into the event this morning, I soon discovered that Robert Jenkinson senior had not drowned from a fishing boat but from the SS Bear, Master J. HAWRIE. The cargo ship was carrying pig iron from Middlesbrough to Grangemouth and sank after a collision with SS Britannia. Twelve of her crew of 14 drowned. (Sources: Canmore and Wreck Site.)

1891_WATKINSONrobtjenk_Death

I wondered…

1866_WATKINSONrobtjenk_Baptism

Reverend Thomas was the incumbent at Filey for 42 years (1831-1873). He has a memorial window in St Oswald’s but the sources readily to hand only reveal him making a speech now and again and “solemnly dedicating” the first Hollon lifeboat. He perhaps wasn’t a hard act for Reverend Basil K. WOODD to follow.

Basil, remarkably, had something in common with Mrs. NORFOLK – they shared the middle name Kilvington. It isn’t immediately apparent that the two were related. Sarah’s maiden name was BARSTOW and she was born in Acomb, about 16 miles from Basil’s birthplace, Aldborough. (Although The Driffield Times notice says the Reverend JACKSON was “of Acomb” he appears to have been a native of Beverley.)

KILVINGTON, as a family name, is surely derived from a geographical location. It is very much a Yorkshire name but there is only South Kilvington in the county. Nottinghamshire has Kilvington – but not many people bearing the name in the 19th century.

Whatever, this coincidence seems to beg further investigation.

FamilySearch is, perhaps for the first time in my experience, rather unhelpful. The Reverend Thomas has several PIDs but only this one gives a reasonable starting point. Others give him the “wrong” spouse and somebody else’s children. The system seems to be culpable, rather than human contributors to the World Tree, but it is still a mess to be cleared up.

I promised in August to “expand” Robert Jenkinson WATKINSON the Younger’s family on FST but seem to have done next to nothing since then. There are not enough hours in the day!