The Unfortunate Apprentice

On the night of Sunday, 10th January 1892, a gale blew the Whitby brig Lancet towards the Filey rocks. The Master, Lewis, ordered the anchors to be cast and these held the vessel until early morning when distress flags brought out the Filey Lifeboat, Hollon the Second. It took about six hours for the Filey volunteers to rescue seven of Lancet’s crew of eight. A newspaper reported that “one boy was drowned while launching the ship’s boat in an effort to get ashore”. Another report named the deceased as Henry COOR, who hailed from London and was “within eight months of completing his apprenticeship”. Henry’s body was transported by wave and tide about three miles and was found at Reighton the next day, the 12th. Several newspapers repeated the macabre and possibly misguided observation that “the poor fellow had evidently been alive when washed ashore, as his hands were full of gravel”. It is hard to imagine him surviving 24 hours in the winter sea.

Henry’s age isn’t given and I couldn’t find a “boy” with his name in London birth registers. Henry Thomas COOR, born in Bethnal Green, would have been 21 in January 1892. Old for a boy, and perhaps for an apprentice seaman, but a curious fact suggests it was indeed he who drowned in Filey Bay. His mother’s maiden name was registered as McCLARENCE. In the June Quarter of 1892 in Bethnal Green, a boy was born to Mrs. COOR née McCLARENLL (sic) and given the name Henry.

The names COOR and McCLARENCE bamboozled most registrars and their clerks. I couldn’t return the young man to his folks today with certainty. I think his father was William and his mother Maria – but she seems to have died aged 24 when Henry the First was two-years-old. It isn’t impossible that Henry the Second’s mother was Emma McCLARENCE, wife of  James COOR and a younger sister of Maria, but it’s quite a stretch.

I just hope the unfortunate apprentice will take his place on the FamilySearch Tree some day.

St Kitts and “Crusoe”

On this day in 1828, almost four months after she had attended her parents’ wedding (incognito), Mary Elizabeth SKERRY returned to the church of St Mary the Virgin in Whitby to be baptized. Mary would be followed by two brothers who have had brief mentions previously in LaFredux – Thomas who was lost from the SS Mexican and Robert who married Naomi STOCKDALE.

In 1858 Mary married  Robert DOBSON who had a couple of grocer’s shops in Filey. He also sold Wines and Spirits and towards the end of his working life running a lodging house, St Kitts on the Foreshore Road. The cream brick property is Holiday Apartments now – I photographed it this afternoon. (The traffic cones are there because the road is still closed at Crescent Hill, where the new granite (?) setts are being slowly laid.)

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The Dobsons were still there in 1901, though perhaps no longer taking guests; Robert is described as a Retired Grocer. Ten years on their road has been renamed The Beach (its current name) and they have almost certainly downsized to a house they chose to call Crusoe.

In 1911 Robert gives his age as 76 and Mary, 83. Sometime in the next couple of years, they crossed the Pennines to end their days with their surviving son, Robert Edwin, and his wife, Edith Florence née RUSHTON. The younger Dobsons were childless and their address in 1911 was 42, Vaughan Road, Liscard in the Birkenhead District where Mary’s death was registered in 1914. Robert senior appears to have lived on for a further nine years, his death registered in Liverpool in the summer of 1923, aged 87.

In one of those odd coincidences, the elder Robert Dobson created something of a stir in Filey by publicly criticizing the way the Local Board “did business” – four years before ‘Hoodwink’ wrote his critical letter to The Scarborough Mercury, (Friday’s post). Within a year or two Robert was elected to the Board and clearly made an attempt to improve matters – obviously without much success.  He does, however, come across in newspaper reports as a man of principle who spoke the truth and expected others to do the same. He was, in other words, not really cut out to be a politician.

SKERRYs are sketchy on Filey Genealogy & Connections; a bit more fleshed out on FamilySearch Tree.

Weather Eye, August

Laf REDUX has completed its first meteorological season so I can offer Summer graphs for the Yorkshire coast; data from the INORTHYO14 PWS. (I noticed this morning that Filey now has a Weather Underground personal weather station reporting. It could be interesting to compare its numbers with those from 30 miles up the coast.)

June this year flamed for the first few days and then settled into a pattern of seemingly cooler days than their equivalents last year. It was no thanks to August that the summer ended 0.32ºC warmer than last year.

2017SummerHIGHcf2016

2017OngoAUGHighCF2016

So, August was just under a degree centigrade cooler than last year. (The rather pointless trend line indicates it became ever so slightly warmer as time passed.) The month was 1.19ºC warmer than the 1979-2000 baseline average and the Summer 2.04 ºC above baseline, a figure that should ring a bell. (But the Yorkshire coast isn’t the globe so perhaps there is nothing to be concerned about.)

The Summer was markedly wetter than last year with 62.6 mm more rain falling on Whitby. August 2017 had a dampness about it that didn’t go well with the cooler temperatures and yet it ended up a couple of mils drier than last year. It seems almost obscene to talk about these pitiful amounts when Harvey has brought such misery to Texas (and Nashville as I write this). And nobody in its path can be looking forward to meeting Irma.

2017SummerPrecipCF2016

PrecipAUG2017cf2016

The wettest day of the summer doesn’t really need highlighting, June 28th saw 27.4mm fall. It wasn’t nearly enough. The meteorological year to date is drier by 177mm compared to last year, and 0.7ºC warmer heading into Autumn.

 

IrmaSEP6projectedGFS
Irma’s position on 6th September as projected by the GFS model, screenshot Ventusky

 

Weather Eye, July

Last month was my tenth July in Filey so I have averaged monthly high temperatures and rainfall for the decade to compare with 2017 figures.

But first – the July highs from 1962 to the present.

JulAvMax62to17

This year, July in Whitby was just over 4°C warmer than in 1962, the trendline reducing the difference to about three degrees.

For the second month running 2017 has been wetter than the previous year.

PrecipJulCF2016

It rained in Filey all day on the 24th but in Whitby, my favourite weather station recorded a fall of only 2.3mm. Fourteen miles south of here, Bridlington received 23.9mm which is “more like it”. I think I mentioned last month that Whitby is maybe too far away, about 30 miles, to be a good proxy for Filey. Alas, Bridlington and other stations closer to home don’t offer records going back ten years.

Although the above graph gives July 2017 a wet look it was actually drier than the ten-year average, as were the four previous years.

JulyPrecipCF10yrAvge

July rainfall has been going against expectation. Warmer temperatures, I thought, usually give higher precipitation but perhaps a month isn’t long enough for weather systems to strut all their stuff.

How have July maximum temperatures compared to the ten-year average?

JulyHighCF10yrAvge

So, roughly speaking, 2013 has been the warmest midsummer month in the last ten years – and the driest. And this July was really nothing to write home about. A trendline on the above temperature graph would show a decadal rise of about a quarter of a degree centigrade compared to the three degrees over the last 55 years. A summer “pause” in Yorkshire coast warming?

A Touch on the Tiller

There are not enough hours in the day to do all I would like to with this blog. Barely two months in I’m going to have to change direction a little. Today’s Image was chosen from five “stock” photos to represent the clear focal point of LaF Redux going forward – the Parish Church of Filey with its graveyard, records, and memories of the town’s people. I’m going to concentrate a little more on “Churchyard Stories” and put more effort into entering information in the Looking at FileyWiki, with links (where they exist) to the FamilySearch Tree. This data entry effort is not glamorous. I would much rather research and write stories but, hey ho… I may only manage a couple of new/ updated LaF stories a week from now on.

Then there is my own family adventure. When I started this blog I had no idea I would stumble on the outrageous pedigree that links me to historical figures going way back to the Dark Ages and even earlier. I am keen to know the truth of these implied genetic connections and only have a chance of finding it if I devote more time to research – on paper and via DNA matching. The history of Filey and its People will have to take a side seat while I try to find out who my ancestors really were.

I will attempt to reach a balance and hope that those of you who have found this blog will continue to stop by occasionally.

I want to thank everyone who has ‘liked’ posts so far and those who are following LaF Redux. I appreciate your generous responses but have to confess I cannot find enough spare moments to see what all of you are up to. (If I tell you I hated every minute I was “on Facebook” you’ll understand I’m not by nature a social networking animal.)

One person has commented and offered kind suggestions for growing my audience. If he/she reads – I emailed to explain my position (old geezer in God’s Waiting Room not doing this for attention, thanks anyway) but the message bounced back undelivered.

I will try to respond to comments that advance knowledge and understanding of the people I write about but will be embarrassed into silence should I receive praise, however kindly it is offered.