Mixed Marriages

Registered at birth as Hester Frances, Esther SHERGOLD is the grandmother of Vena Beatrice SMALL, wife of Corporal Robert HARRISON (Saturday’s post). The area around Wilton in Wiltshire was a hotbed of Shergolds in the 19th century.

In 1861 Hester is seven years old and described in the census as “daughter of Housekeeper”. Her widowed mother, Ann, has two other children with her in the household of John TRIGLE, an agricultural labourer and a widower.

The GRO Births Index entry for Tom Shergold (1846) gives his mother’s maiden surname as THORN; for younger sister Sarah Ann (1851) it is THORNE. Hester’s mother is not named in the GRO Index. This is usually an indication that the child is illegitimate.

The search for Ann’s dead husband brought these two marriages –

John Trigle had three motherless children in the house kept by Ann Shergold in 1861 and the Births Index affirms that his wife’s maiden name was Everett.

The first sight I had of Emanuel Shergold was on the FamilySearch Tree.

This Emanuel died in 1859, Charlotte fifteen years later. “Just Jane” in the screenshot is Charlotte’s daughter by an unknown father, born before marriage to Emanuel and, I suspect, unwisely married off to stepbrother James because she is described in the 1851 census (HO107 Piece 1848 f.115 p.15) as Emanuel’s “daughter in law”.

The Emanuel who married Ann in 1846 died towards the end of the following year, when his son Tom was about a year old.

And yes, dear reader, John Trigle married his housekeeper in 1864. In 1881 they are enumerated in Church Street, Stapleford. John, 58, works the fields and Ann takes in laundry. The 1891 census indicates that Ann has ceased work but John labours on at the given age of only 66.

Ann’s youngest child made her way to London and in 1880 (as Esther) married Gilbert SMALL, a policeman, in Camberwell. They had eleven children. Second daughter Lydia Vina (or Vena) did not offer her maiden name when registering the birth of Viena Beatrice Small in the first quarter of 1905, or give the father’s name when the child was baptised (as Vena Beatrick in transcription) at Charlton Near Dover, Kent (19 January).

“Beatrice V Small” married Robert Harrison in Scarborough in 1931 and in 1950, three years after Robert’s death, “Vena B” married Cyril HARDWICK in Filey St Oswald’s. This stone marks her grave in the churchyard…

In loving memory of VENA BEATRICE, dearly loved wife of CYRIL HARDWICK

and a dear mother, fell asleep 16th March 1976 aged 71.

‘Gone from our home

but not from our hearts’

Flight of Fancy 30 · Sand Trees

Google alt text: a close up of a person’s hair

Lunatics at Large

On the 7th August 1880, the unfortunate George MARTIN appeared before the Bridlington Petty Sessions. This insignificant event passed me by on Tuesday so I made a note to update the story next year. This morning the Radio Five Live breakfast news informed me that “America” was intending to impose more sanctions on Russia for poisoning the Skripals. And yesterday several social media companies in the vicinity of San Francisco wiped Alex Jones’ Info Wars from their platforms. News of other hideous events appeared during the day. They all seemed to be connected.

I wrote a brief post about poor George in Looking at Filey a few years ago. Here is the syndicated news report that also appeared in The Scarborough Mercury.

1880_MARTINgeorge1_NEWS

I added the following comment:-

The only likely young George MARTIN I could find was George J., aged 20 in 1881, a jet worker living with his widowed aunt at Pier, Whitby (RG114834 f95). I hope this was the wanderer because the record suggests he had three things going for him – a roof over his head, a wage coming in and family to care for him – enough to keep the demons at bay, perhaps. I wonder what became of him.

With access to more sources, I looked again and found evidence to support my hunch. Two months earlier a Whitby jet worker of the same name had appeared before a Scarborough court.

1880_MARTINgeorge2_NEWS

I think there is just enough here to proceed on the assumption that these disturbed Georges are one and the same – and that he was with his Aunt in Whitby when the census enumerator came to call the following year.

I did some more detective work but failed to discover what became of George. I found out, though, that tragedy attended his birth. He was just a few days old, at most a month or so, when a terrific storm hit the northeast coast of England. Many vessels were driven on shore and wrecked. A lot of sailors lost their lives. The Whitby lifeboat went out at least five times and rescued a number of men before a particularly nasty combination of waves, rebounding from the stricken vessel Merchant of Maldon, turned the lifeboat over. Only one of the crew survived. Of the twelve that drowned…

Six of the bodies, viz., Isaac Dobson, Matthew Laidley, Wm. Walker, Wm, Storr, Wm. Tyneman, and George Martin, were recovered on the same day. The majority of these twelve men had saved the crews of five vessels that day; and these brave fellows, especially the Storrs and the Laidleys, had on many occasions within the last twenty years heroically and devotedly risked their lives for the preservation of others; and it mattered not how tempestuous the storm, or how heavy the sea, if they saw their fellow creatures in imminent danger, they would make intrepid and strenuous exertions to save them.

This Yorkshire Gazette account of 16 February notes those left behind included “Geo. Martin, aged 25, wife and infant”, and says, “It may also be remarked that George Martin’s brother and Christopher Collins’s brother were drowned by the upsetting of a coble on February 4th, 1842.”

When the 1861 Census was taken a few weeks later, on the 7th of April, infant George James was with his mother Jane at the home in Cragg, Whitby, of her older sister Ann, and husband Mark WINN. Ten years later Jane and George were enumerated at Pier, Whitby. And, as noted earlier, in 1881 widow Ann Winn, aged 60, is recorded at Pier with George James and niece Ellen NORTON, aged 12. Sources indicate that Jane had remarried and was living nearby, at Cragg, with husband William LEWIS and 24-year-old stepson, Henry – a police constable! (You couldn’t make it up.)

The WILTON girls, Ann and Jane, can be found on FamilySearch Tree, and Mark WINN too, but they are as yet “unconnected”. I couldn’t find the Georges Martin but they may be on the World Tree somewhere.

The bravery of those Whitby fishermen and sailors, who risked their lives to save others, is in marked contrast to the behavior of “men” nowadays. A couple of news reports today say a Saudi led airstrike on Yemen has killed fifty people, most of them children in a school bus, and a report just released tells us that monks and teachers at Ampleforth and Downside schools have been sexually abusing children for over 40 years.

It seems unlikely that America will impose sanctions on the Saudis for slaughtering innocents. Perhaps it will be argued that International Law hasn’t been broken.

Unless I have missed something, there has been no evidence presented yet to prove that Russia tried to kill the Skripals with Novichok. The regimes in the United States, UK, some EU countries, Arab States, Israel – lunatics all and, terrifyingly, at large. (Many of their misdeeds are, of course, not reported at all.)