Wrightson

The distinctive first name came from his paternal grandmother’s family. Jane WRIGHTSON was born in “Heartbeat Country” – Goathland on the North York Moors – and died at the beginning of the year in which her grandson was born.

Wrightson married Mary Jane SHAW in 1877. The newspaper report of his death says he left three children. Filey Genealogy & Connections has daughters Miriam Elizabeth and Mary Jane; the FamilySearch Tree just Miriam. (More work to do.)

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The Loss of ‘Integrity’

Some mornings I set out on my sea of data to see where the breezes take me. The storm of March 1883 blew up and I think it will take a few days to figure the human consequences. I have been this way before. Last year I introduced the son of the skipper of the yawl Integrity ­– Jacky Windy – and suggested readers go to the old Looking at Filey blog for an account of the Storm. When I provided the link to the British Library Web Archive back then it worked. About a month ago I discovered that the functionality had been compromised. Quite why the British Library summarily ended “Open Access” remains a mystery. I was promised a licence to give REDUX readers access to old stuff, but it hasn’t reached me yet. I’ll give it a few more days.

Integrity, a 33-ton yawl with a lute stern, was built by William SMITH in Scarborough in 1857. She went to Hull and was registered as H1207. Henry WYRILL bought her in 1881 and brought her back to Scarborough, registering her as SH159. Nicholas CAMMISH skippered initially but it was the unfortunate Joseph WINSHIP who went down with her and four crew in the ’83 March storm. It could have been a tragedy for two other families. Yawls sometimes took along a cook, and a boy whose main utility, it seems, was to take the blame for anything that went wrong.)

A syndicated news item named the drowned fishermen.

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“R. Wilkinson” was Horatio, a native of Sussex. (His first name was mangled into “Corattro” by a transcriber of the 1881 census.) Today, I’ll just give the link to George SCOTTER on the FamilySearch Shared Tree. The newspaper was correct in stating he had six children. There are currently nine on FST. Two died before their father drowned and one, Robert born 1877, is a cuckoo in the nest.

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In loving memory of ELIZABETH SCOTTER, who died December 9th, 1899, aged 50 years.

‘God calls on me I must attend

Death takes me from my bosom friends

He hath released me from my pain

In Heaven oh may we meet again’

Also, of GEORGE SCOTTER husband of the above, who was lost at sea March 6th, 1883, aged 37 years.

‘He’s gone the one we loved so dear

To his eternal rest

He’s gone to Heaven, we have no fear

To be forever blest’

 

The Storm and Jacky Windy

The gales of 6th and 7th March 1883 caused the deaths of at least seven Filey fishermen. Five drowned from the yawl Integrity, off Spurn Head near the mouth of the Humber.

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Joseph WINSHIP was skipper of the vessel and his only child, John Williamson, was approaching his 13th birthday when his father was lost. John would take up the hard and uncertain life of a fisherman – and the curious byname ‘Jacky Windy’.

John married Mary Elizabeth POOL in 1889 and at the next three censuses the household in Chapel Street, and later West Parade, had room for widow Ellis Ann as well as the couple’s six children.

Two of the children had died as infants before 1911 but the boys born first and last made it to their eighties, as did their parents.

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Returning to the fatal storm – you can read an account of it on the archived Looking at Filey. The families of most of the drowned fishermen have some representation on FST but there wasn’t enough time in the day to fill gaps and make sound connections for this post. Find Joseph James WINSHIP here.