The Errors of Our Ways

A couple of days ago, in the process of tidying up a spreadsheet of “Stone People”, I revisited the family of Benjamin Simpson and Ann nee RICHARDSON. I had left them in November 2019 with five children on the FamilySearch Shared Tree and noticed they had been given another child.

The late arrival of a bundle of joy is sometimes described as “a surprise”. That would have been an understatement for Ann, giving birth at age 60 when her youngest son Benjamin junior was 22 years old.

FamilySearch attempts a rescue.

The single source attached to Hannah M is the 1891 Census, which clearly shows her to be the daughter of Ann.

Grandson Benjamin is the third child of Richard Richardson Simpson (the Second) and Christiana BULMER. You may have twigged that Hannah M is his older sister.

SIMPSON, Hannah Maria, Mother’s Maiden Surname: BULMER. GRO Reference: 1878 S Quarter in SCARBOROUGH Volume 09D Page 356.

GRO Births Index

Curiously, the “System” declares there are no Possible Duplicates for Hannah M, but she flourishes elsewhere as Hannah Maria.

The single source for Hannah Maria is the 1881 Census. It correctly identifies her place in the scheme of things and introduces us to younger sister Elizabeth Ann. The source for Lilly of the screenshot is the 1891 household of Charles Bulmer and Rebecca nee ELIOTT. I haven’t found a birth registration for her and suspect she has been mistaken for Elizabeth Ann, who went by “Lizzie” according to a note in Filey Genealogy & Connections.

Hannah Maria married Francis Davidson Forrest GOODWILL in St Mary’s Church, Scarborough, on 19 February 1900. Both died in their fifties, Francis in York in 1930 and Hannah in Scarborough in 1934.

Sea 39 · Swimmer

Filey Bay

Over the Target

Anyone publicly challenging BS regime narratives these days receives flak. If you are over the target on the FamilySearch Shared Tree clouds of Blue Hints appear onscreen.

A week ago, in Garden of Earthly Delights, I offered screenshots of two Robert Jenkinsons born in 1819. One was rightly the son of Thomas and Mary nee CASTLE and the other mistakenly so. After adding all but one of Right Robert’s missing children with Elizabeth COLE, I connected him with his parents. The two Roberts are now “brothers” – and the system has issued “Possible Duplicate Child” warnings.

For now, Wrong Robert will remain a child of Thomas and Mary. I have made just enough changes to enable me to put the other Robert’s headstone on the Shared Tree as a memory. ( I didn’t add Jane to the family he created with Elizabeth. The child’s name is inscribed in stone but I have so far been unable to find a birth, census, or death record for her.)

This representation of Robert and Ann BARWICK is problematic. It asks us to believe Ann was twelve years old when she had an illegitimate child, and thirteen when she married. It also shows son William dying in 1849, even though an attached census source shows the boy aged three in 1851.

There is a source for the marriage on 13 September 1846 and the banns (below). The absence of Blue Hints is significant. Robert’s death in Durham is confidently asserted but searching for a record on Findmypast (+/- 5 years) returns nothing.

The births of William and James were registered.

JENKINSON, William, Mother’s Maiden Surname: BARWICK. GRO Reference: 1847 J Quarter in OF YORK IN THE CITY AND COUNTY OF YORK Volume 23 Page 709.

JENKINSON, James, Mother’s Maiden Surname: BARWICK. GRO Reference: 1849 D Quarter in OF YORK IN THE CITY AND COUNTY OF YORK Volume 23 Page 672.

GRO Index

But after 1851 the family disappears. I have found neither hide nor hair of them after this date.

The Lucky Country

24,000 children

Australia Under Attack

Insect 38 · Fly

Possibly a Horse Fly, Pampletine Cliffs

What Happened to Peter?

Elizabeth MURPHY was sixteen years old, single, and a yarn winder in 1861 (Sunday’s post). Ten years later she was mother to four children and working as a “baller in a flax mill”. The birth of the first child, Mary, was registered in Malton in the same quarter as her marriage to John NASH.

For a few shocked moments, I contemplated a Free BMD record being wrong.

Bramham is just a mile from Elizabeth’s home in 1861. On census night that year, Peter was about fourteen miles away, an apprentice “living in” with Spurriergate butcher John JUDSON. John’s eldest daughter, Ann Elizabeth, was a year older than Peter but fate (or passion) connected him to Elizabeth Murphy.

McClear is an Irish family name and McLEAR Scottish. Representatives of each clan seem to be few and far between in England but there is this birth registration fifty miles away from Bramham in the quarter following Peter and Elizabeth’s marriage.

Nine years later, Elizabeth and John Nash named their sixth child James. James McClear/McLear was not with them in 1871 but I haven’t found a record of his death.

I have been unable to find a source for Peter’s death. The 1861 census gives his birthplace as Liverpool. A Peter McLEARY was born in 1843 (mother McCONNEL) and a Peter McCLARY the following year (mother McDERMOTT) but I could find neither boy in the 1851 census in Lancashire or Yorkshire. (I tried “fuzzy searches” and all the variant spellings I could think of.)

Another Peter McClear did, however, appear. Born in Ireland in 1802, he was enumerated in York in 1851, living less than a mile from Spurriergate, and for a moment I wondered if he was the father of “our Peter”. But he is listed as an unmarried Master Mariner. That he is the uncle of the Head of the household, one Thomas HUSBAND – a flax dresser! – could help further investigation but all I have so far is that he was still a boarder in St Clement’s Place twenty years later, aged 69, and single. (Peter McCLERE, Retired Mariner). He died in York aged 76 in 1879.

I searched newspapers for all the people mentioned in this post and only found this possible reference to Peter the Elder.

Another snippet gives Malabar’s weight as 1,372 tons. William Clark may have painted her.

With so few of the McClear clan crossing the Irish Sea to seek their fortunes in Victorian Britain, it seems unlikely that I’ll hear any more of young Peter – but I would like to know what happened to him. He seems real enough to be given a place on the Shared Tree. (Two Blue Hints appearing on his record suggest “the system” concurs.)

Water 42· Martin’s Ravine

Cascade

Mary, Mary

I was preparing a story about the man who married sisters when I noticed the FamilySearch Shared Tree has given him a guesswork grandmother.

The nine children of Mary THOMPSON shown here can only rustle up one source between them – and that is a census. Had the contributors of this oddball brood sought evidence of their arrival in the vale of tears, they would have discovered that four began life in the body of another woman. And the genetic material to make the other five was donated by a different John CARTER.

John of the screenshot has two sources – both noting his baptism in Flamborough. Just before Christmas 1845 he married Mary STEPHENSON.

Marriages Dec 1845

CARTER John & STEPHENSON Mary, Bridlington 23 43.

Free BMD

Mary S. was born in Ulrome in 1824 to William and Hannah. She gave birth to five sons, the first four boys in the screenshot above and poor Robert, who lived for just a few weeks.

Mary T. first saw light in Kexby, almost forty miles inland from Ulrome. She married her John in York.

Marriages Mar 1846

CARTER John & THOMPSON Mary, York 23 677. 

This chap worked as a “railway labourer” and the couple started their family in York. The births of Hannah, Edward and Thompson were registered in Malton.

Given the lack of care in putting this misleading family unit together, I do not have any qualms about attempting to set the records straight.

Path 112 · St Oswald’s Churchyard

Jumping to Conclusions

I continued piecing together Ann Eliza COOPER’s life today. I thought that drafting a chronological “sketch” would help me navigate the information deficient years, (marriage to Richard GEOGHEGAN in the 1850s and her whereabouts in 1871, seven years after his death).

On reaching empty spaces, I turned to available sources to see if I could discover something germane, and happened upon a significant “new” person.

I mentioned in an earlier post that Ann Eliza left York after her third husband’s death to work as a Waiting Room Attendant at Withernsea Railway Station. Her granddaughter “Julian” went with her, and at the age of 18 formed a relationship with Railway Porter, William WINSHIP. I had wondered if Julianne’s father was Ann Eliza’s firstborn, Thomas, but had yet to find him – anywhere.

A marriage in 1869 of a Thomas to Anne Elizabeth SIGSWORTH seemed promising but soon hit the rocks. Two years later, an initially dubious Thomas who took Melinda EASTBURN for a wife led to some pieces fitting together. The birth registration of “Julia Ann” Green in Leeds was followed by the death of Melinda Green two years later, at the age of 22. Four years earlier Melinda was enumerated in a Leeds household headed by a 36-year-old Block Cutter called George ELLIS. His wife was Melinda’s older sister Martha, 20; the marriage registered in the June Quarter of 1870. With them was Thomas Eastburn, George’s “nephew”, aged 7 months. I expected to find the boy was illegitimate but what took me by surprise was that the registration (September Quarter) gave him the middle name “Ellis”. What conclusion would you jump to? When my great grandmother was made pregnant and abandoned, she gave her son a middle name that told the world who his father was.

A quick search didn’t find George, Martha or young Thomas in 1881. I couldn’t find a death registration for the boy in his first decade but he clearly didn’t go with his younger half sister (possibly) to York and then to Withernsea.

I still don’t know what happened to Julianne’s father, Thomas (Ann Eliza’s son). When she married William Winship in 1893 she told the clerk that Thomas was a Horse Dealer. In 1901 there is a Thomas Green, widower, with the right age and birthplace, living in Hull and working as a “Commission Agent Horse Racing”. Ten years later he is at a different address in Hull and a “Commission Agent”. An easy conclusion to jump to – that this chap is Julianne’s father. But he writes on the 1911 census form that he had been married for 15 years and had four children, of whom two are living. Perhaps he married again and forgot all about Melinda and Julianne.

Flight of Fancy 22 · Cube

Reighton Sands (...gives a meal man appeal)

She Married a Waterman…

…and a Whitesmith, and a Railway Wagon Wright. Ann Eliza COOPER, daughter of a Cottingham shoemaker, was sixty years-old when her third husband, George WINTERBURN, was killed.

Six years earlier, George was working in his former trade as a ship carpenter and living in Ebor Street, York. Sharing the small terrace house were grand-daughter “Julian” GREEN (7) and sister in law “Julian G” COOPER (80). It is amusing that the unusual spelling  “Juliann” caused census enumerators and other minor bureaucrats a lot of trouble. Family relationships are also somewhat mangled where Annie Eliza’s various families are concerned. Her first husband was William GREEN but I don’t think this young girl, “Julian”, is a close relation of hers. “Julian G”, however, is Annie Eliza’s mother, Juliann née OGLESBY.

During the next six years George found work with the Railway Company, Juliann the Elder died (1885) and the household moved to Cambridge Street. The house has been demolished but the street itself remains and its proximity to George’s source of income and the scene of his death are indicated in this Google Street View screen grab.

It seems as though the Railway Company found work for third-time unlucky widow Ann Eliza. The 1891 census finds her sixty miles to the east, living in the “Porters House” by the Station where she is a Waiting Room Attendant. Juliann the Younger (18) is with her, insisting she is Ann Eliza’s granddaughter, and also a boarder, William WINSHIP (21), working as a railway porter. He is Filey-born and marries Juliann two years later.

Twenty years pass. At the 1911 census, William Winship is now a railway signalman at South Milford near Pontefract, living in the nearby village of Hillam with Juliann and three sons. Annie Eliza, 83, is with them and described as “grandmother to wife”. Also present on census night – but probably in permanent residence, is “great aunt to wife” Mary Jane COOPER (85). This is actually Ann Eliza’s elder sister, the first-born child of the Cottingham shoemaker. She would live for five years after the death of Ann Eliza in the spring of 1914.

Ann Eliza’s last spell as a widow had lasted 27 years. I haven’t found death records for William Green or her second husband Richard GEOGHEGAN,  so cannot say what her married life to widowhood ratio is. I’m puzzled too about how many children she had. William Winship writes on the 1911 census form that she had five children and three were still living. I have only found three birth registrations and one of those children died at about six months. Perhaps firstborn Thomas or another boy who lived was the father of Juliann the Younger. (The reason for my aforementioned uncertainty regarding Ann Eliza’s “granddaughter” is that George Winterburn, given age 15, is living in Langthorpe with Robert and Maria GREEN, their four sons and three daughters in 1841.)

When Ann Eliza married William Green in 1847, the church register gave his address as “on the river”. The births of their first three children were registered in York but secondborn Ernest’s birthplace is given as Grimsby in the 1851 census. It seems likely that Ann Eliza voyaged up and down the Humber and Ouse for the first few years of married life. Father William cannot be found for certain in 1851, and in 1861 Ann Eliza is in Scarborough with Richard the Whitesmith, her son Thomas Green, her widowed mother Juliann – and a three year-old “niece”, Ann Eliza COOPER. The birth registration indicates the child is illegitimate and was possibly named after her mother.

I couldn’t find Ann Eliza Cooper the Elder on the FamilySearch Shared Tree and so gave her an ID [G71F-8HC]. She is still single as I write this, but as soon as I can I will marry her three times and give her all the children I find. She has a stronger connection to Filey than William Winship gives her. I had a long chat with a second great grandson of hers on the Coble Landing yesterday.

Beach 109 · Filey Sands

The Three Wives of William Welburn

William is the father of Alfred and therefore grandfather to Elizabeth of Picturesque Terrace (last Wednesday’s post).

Elizabeth Strangway, you may recall, was close in both age and geography to Elizabeth Strangeway – about six months younger and at one time a ten-minute walk away from her almost namesake. But which of them was the daughter in law of William Welburn?

FamilySearch screenshots tell stories.

WELBURN_wmHarriett_FSTscreenshot

This is rather sketchy but I believe Alfred’s mother was indeed Harriett. I’m still not sure that his mother in law was Sarah MATTHEWS because not only were the Two Elizabeths close in age at birth, they seem to have died within a year of each other. Geography again has a part to play. The Elizabeth pictured above, (let’s call her Elizabeth I), registered the births of six of her nine children in Hull but died in Selby in 1912 aged 71. Elizabeth II died the previous year in Hull, aged 72. Had she been the daughter of Frances Gibson her age should have been given as 70.

On second thoughts, because Alfred’s birth had been registered in Selby, and his father was born in a village only five miles away from there, the screenshot above may indeed be true in every respect, as far as it goes. A doubt lingers though because Elizabeth I was enumerated in Francis Street, Hull in 1911.

Here is another screenshot story.

WELBURN_wmAnn_FSTscreenshot

This is Alfred’s father. He really did marry Ann Thickett, just not when he was eleven years old. (This William would have been only a year old when he made Harriett pregnant for the first time.) Spare a thought for Ann having four children in her fifties. Mary J had fourteen children. Would Ann have lived long enough to dandle any of them on her knee?

1852_WelburnLaycock_Marr

Ann married as the widow Laycock in 1852, bringing along Vincent and Eliza for William to step-parent.

Fourteen months earlier, William had married his second wife in Selby.

1851_WelburnFish_Marr

She too had been married before but appears to have been childless. She was a stepmother to Ann/Hannah (13), Alfred (8) and Alice (1) for less than six months before dying aged 34.

The children’s mother, William’s first wife Harriett CUNDELL, had died in the September Quarter of the previous year, aged 37.

William, a millwright by trade, was clearly a man of action – if what I have told you about him is true.

My narrative of the Three Wives cannot be followed on the Shared Tree. There are some vital pieces of the puzzle to chase down and when I have them, I’ll make the necessary changes on FamilySearch. I think the travesty of the William and Ann Thickett screenshot was largely the result of “the system” going haywire, rather than a human contributor losing their mind. None of these people is a blood relative, and they only connect tangentially to Phyllis, my first cousin once removed, but I feel I should make an effort to set things straight.

Clouds 40 · Filey Bay

6_20160406FileyBay3_8m

Strangeways

If Mr Swain, my teacher in the top class at Stoneferry J & I, had asked me what the name “Strangeways” conjured up I would have shuddered and mumbled, “the jail, sir”. The lock-up’s reputation was contagious enough to infect little children. (Google it.)

Now, in my dotage, I find I have Strangeways (or variants thereof) in my family tree – and genealogical criminal acts have been perpetrated upon some of them. That’s perhaps a bit strong. I’ll reduce the charge to “microaggressions”.

I have no interest in sending anyone down for the offences. Some mistakes are easily made on the FamilySearch Tree. I expect to be found guilty any day now.

I call William STRANGEWAY.

His birth was registered in the December Quarter of 1842 in York, the son of James, a brickmaker, and Sarah née MATTHEWS. He didn’t stay long enough to celebrate his first birthday but here he is on the Shared Tree.

STRANGWAYwm4243_FSTscreenshot

William is without sources here but checking the GRO for his asserted death in Leeds in 1894 gives this –

1894_STRANGEWAYwm_Death

A calculated arrival three years out of whack rings a warning bell.

Let’s first look for a York birth registration in 1842.

1842_STRANGWAYwm_Birth

Year and mother fit the Shared Tree screenshot.

There is nothing for us in York three years later but in the first quarter of 1846 –

1846_STRANGEWAYwm_Birth

In 1851 the census puts William the Younger with parents Robert, a brick and tile maker, and Frances née GIBSON at 5 Aldwark, which is a ten-minute walk from James and Sarah’s home in Redeness Street. William the Elder is beyond the ken of the enumerator of course but his two sisters, Elizabeth and Ann, are recorded with brother Thomas and grandmother Ann née MEPHAM.

The Aldwark house also shelters an Elizabeth. If the births of the two girls were registered on time, less than six months separate their appearance on the planet. There’s a greater chance of some latter-day family historian mixing these two up!

STRANGEWAYwm4694_FSTscreenshot

Robert Strangways died aged 44 in 1853. In 1861, William is 15, working as a cloth dresser and living with his mother in Ratcliffe Yard, Leeds. He marries Ellen ARCHER in that city about eight years later.

Sarah Strangway, six years a widow, marries George GREEN in York in late 1862. Her second marriage does not last. In 1871, a widow again, she is living in Marygate with offspring Charlotte and James Strangway. James chooses not to marry and is with his mother in 1891, working as a labourer. Sarah, 73, is a nurse. Ten years later she is in the York workhouse. James is still alive, whereabouts unknown to me in 1901. His mother dies aged 85 in 1903 and James follows her into eternity less than a year later, aged 50.

I wonder if James’ sister Elizabeth attended either of the funerals. She died in Hull in 1911 after burying four of the nine children she had with Alfred WELBURN, one of them being “my Strangway”, first wife of William Henry Phillip SMAWFIELD who then married my grandaunt Elizabeth Ann LOCKETT.

This is a confusing number of Elizabeths to deal with and I am in some doubt now. Have I chosen the right Elizabeth from the two girls born in York in the early 1840s? Although confident I have sorted out the Williams, I don’t have cast iron sources for their sisters. A church marriage source naming a father would give me comfort but I haven’t found one yet. I’ll go over my evidence and report another day.

Mark of Man 45 · Bell Buoy

4_20170404BellBuoy1_2m

This gives a better sense of the size of Bell Buoy than Thursday’s sunrise photo.

Foraging Unmasked

I did my weekly shop at the supermarket this morning. I wore nitrile gloves and a scarf in case I needed to protect people from my droplets. I saw only one other person wearing a scarf. So far, in the town, I have seen just one person in a mask.

In the Czech Republic and Slovakia, it is mandatory to wear a mask out of doors. The governments didn’t supply masks so nationwide cottage industries sprang up to meet demand. Chris Martenson put this onscreen in his post yesterday.

CzechsLeadTheWay

This afternoon I heard a UK doctor on national radio explain how ineffective masks are in protecting against catching Covid-19 disease. He was particularly scathing about homemade masks. He concluded by appealing to the great unwashed not to wear masks at all. “Leave them for our health workers on the frontline.” But…but… I thought you said…

CzechData

Go figure.

Robbed

Searching through newspapers for Richard Warneford’s second marriage, I found he was quite familiar with the inside of a courtroom.

In 1853 a “Grand Jury” dropped a bill against Thomas RICHARDSON, for stealing two silk handkerchiefs belonging to Richard.

In 1867 Charles THOMPSON, of Husthwaite, stole two lace shawls, one cashmere shawl and three-quarters of a yard of silk velvet from John GROVES, a draper in Parliament Street, York. Not quite satisfied with his acquisitions, the thief went along to Richard’s shop and took a further 6½ yards of silk velvet. A few days later, in Northallerton, he attempted to sell the goods. Sergeant NICHOLSON watched him go from door to door for a short while before taking him into custody on suspicion. Thompson explained to the court that he had been indulging in betting on horse races.

A much greater loss was suffered by Richard in 1851.

1851_WARNEFORDrchd_ROBBED_News

According to The National Archives, this is what £150 would have purchased back then…

1851_Valueof150l

Poor William. He has a place on the Shared Tree (MP22-323), courtesy of a christening record, and the names of his parents enabled their 1851 household to be quickly found. His father, Henry, was an Ostler and his mother a Sextoness. I wonder what she thought as her boy was sent to prison for 12 months.

In January the following year, Richard was up before the beak with another draper, John DRAKE. They were charged with “having neglected to scrape, sweep, and cleanse the flags fronting their shops, after having been duly ordered by the local board of health to do so”. The authorities wanted to set an example and acknowledged they were no more guilty than many other shopkeepers in the town. As the first to be summoned for the offence, they were let off without a fine.

Little Warneford Annie

There isn’t a single representative of the WARNEFORD family name in Filey Genealogy & Connections. Kath’s database has Blanche Annie WARNFORD marrying Filey Draper Robert Dixon COLLEY. Born in “186-“, she doesn’t have a birthplace. The couple has two children, Edwin Warnford Colley and May, both born in Stockton, County Durham.

There is a small family of Warnefords enumerated in Queen Street, Filey, in 1881. Retired draper, Richard, his wife Elizabeth, and two daughters, Elizabeth and Mary. Richard had run a linen and woollen drapery business in York from around 1850 to the early 70s when he retired to the coast. In 1877 he bought at auction a house and shop on the South Cliff, Scarborough for £1,420 but clearly didn’t occupy the property for long.  After residing in Filey for a while he moved the thirteen miles to Bridlington, where he died aged 61 on June 4, 1886. His wife Elizabeth, nine years his junior, was living with married daughter Elizabeth in Sheffield in 1891. Daughter Mary, approaching 30 and single was there too. Both Warneford women were “living on their own means”. Head of household, daughter Elizabeth’s husband William Henry NEAVE, was described as a “Foreign Corresponding Clerk”, which sounds quite exciting.

There are more Elizabeth’s than are helpful in this family. Draper Richard seems to have first married Elizabeth BREALEY in 1854. She gave birth to William later that year and died the year after. (I’m basing this supposition on the death registration of an Elizabeth Warneford aged 28 in York.) Elizabeth the Second appears very clearly in the next four censuses, birthplace Howden, but I cannot find a second marriage source. Christening records are available for Elizabeth and Mary (mother just “Elizabeth”) but birth registrations for them, and for Blanche Annie are yet to be found.

There is a civil marriage record for Blanche Annie and Robert Dixon COLLEY in Stockton (1884) but at her death in 1922 she is just Annie.

FamilySearch offers two christening sources for Anne/Annie Warneford.

1860_WarnefordAnnie11861_WarnefordAnnie2

The 1871 census gives “All Saints” as the birthplaces of four children of Richard and Elizabeth I and II – William, Elizabeth, Mary and “Annie”. I can only find a birth registration for the Annie who is a daughter of Farmer John. This little Warneford didn’t marry, preferring to live à deux with female companions.

Are Anne, Annie and Blanche Annie the same person? There isn’t enough evidence yet to say for certain one way or the other. But, hey, remember Robert Dixon Colley was a draper.

Robert is one of the Skipsea branch of Colleys. They settled in Filey for many years, but I haven’t yet happened upon any that sleep here eternally. So, I am unlikely to extend their pedigree on FST.