Robbed

Searching through newspapers for Richard Warneford’s second marriage, I found he was quite familiar with the inside of a courtroom.

In 1853 a “Grand Jury” dropped a bill against Thomas RICHARDSON, for stealing two silk handkerchiefs belonging to Richard.

In 1867 Charles THOMPSON, of Husthwaite, stole two lace shawls, one cashmere shawl and three-quarters of a yard of silk velvet from John GROVES, a draper in Parliament Street, York. Not quite satisfied with his acquisitions, the thief went along to Richard’s shop and took a further 6½ yards of silk velvet. A few days later, in Northallerton, he attempted to sell the goods. Sergeant NICHOLSON watched him go from door to door for a short while before taking him into custody on suspicion. Thompson explained to the court that he had been indulging in betting on horse races.

A much greater loss was suffered by Richard in 1851.

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According to The National Archives, this is what £150 would have purchased back then…

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Poor William. He has a place on the Shared Tree (MP22-323), courtesy of a christening record, and the names of his parents enabled their 1851 household to be quickly found. His father, Henry, was an Ostler and his mother a Sextoness. I wonder what she thought as her boy was sent to prison for 12 months.

In January the following year, Richard was up before the beak with another draper, John DRAKE. They were charged with “having neglected to scrape, sweep, and cleanse the flags fronting their shops, after having been duly ordered by the local board of health to do so”. The authorities wanted to set an example and acknowledged they were no more guilty than many other shopkeepers in the town. As the first to be summoned for the offence, they were let off without a fine.

Little Warneford Annie

There isn’t a single representative of the WARNEFORD family name in Filey Genealogy & Connections. Kath’s database has Blanche Annie WARNFORD marrying Filey Draper Robert Dixon COLLEY. Born in “186-“, she doesn’t have a birthplace. The couple has two children, Edwin Warnford Colley and May, both born in Stockton, County Durham.

There is a small family of Warnefords enumerated in Queen Street, Filey, in 1881. Retired draper, Richard, his wife Elizabeth, and two daughters, Elizabeth and Mary. Richard had run a linen and woollen drapery business in York from around 1850 to the early 70s when he retired to the coast. In 1877 he bought at auction a house and shop on the South Cliff, Scarborough for £1,420 but clearly didn’t occupy the property for long.  After residing in Filey for a while he moved the thirteen miles to Bridlington, where he died aged 61 on June 4, 1886. His wife Elizabeth, nine years his junior, was living with married daughter Elizabeth in Sheffield in 1891. Daughter Mary, approaching 30 and single was there too. Both Warneford women were “living on their own means”. Head of household, daughter Elizabeth’s husband William Henry NEAVE, was described as a “Foreign Corresponding Clerk”, which sounds quite exciting.

There are more Elizabeth’s than are helpful in this family. Draper Richard seems to have first married Elizabeth BREALEY in 1854. She gave birth to William later that year and died the year after. (I’m basing this supposition on the death registration of an Elizabeth Warneford aged 28 in York.) Elizabeth the Second appears very clearly in the next four censuses, birthplace Howden, but I cannot find a second marriage source. Christening records are available for Elizabeth and Mary (mother just “Elizabeth”) but birth registrations for them, and for Blanche Annie are yet to be found.

There is a civil marriage record for Blanche Annie and Robert Dixon COLLEY in Stockton (1884) but at her death in 1922 she is just Annie.

FamilySearch offers two christening sources for Anne/Annie Warneford.

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The 1871 census gives “All Saints” as the birthplaces of four children of Richard and Elizabeth I and II – William, Elizabeth, Mary and “Annie”. I can only find a birth registration for the Annie who is a daughter of Farmer John. This little Warneford didn’t marry, preferring to live à deux with female companions.

Are Anne, Annie and Blanche Annie the same person? There isn’t enough evidence yet to say for certain one way or the other. But, hey, remember Robert Dixon Colley was a draper.

Robert is one of the Skipsea branch of Colleys. They settled in Filey for many years, but I haven’t yet happened upon any that sleep here eternally. So, I am unlikely to extend their pedigree on FST.

The Resting Places

When Paul gave me a quick tour of the churchyard to show me some of the headstones he and his helpers have repaired and restored, I showed him the grave of George Thomas Brown PLACE. This is how it looked in the summer.

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And yesterday…

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George was a Clerk in Holy Orders and served as a curate at St Oswald’s for a few years. He married his father’s housekeeper in 1906 when he was 47 years old. Emily HORNER was 35. They had one child, Mary Elinor, who was three-years-old when her father died.

The inscription stone has lost most of its leading but, in its much cleaner state, can be more readily deciphered.

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To the glory of God and in sacred memory of GEORGE THOMAS BROWN PLACE, called to higher service May 12th 1910.

EMILY PLACE, re-united Dec 24th 1939, and their daughter, MARY ELINOR PLACE, died March 20th 1985.

‘Non Omnis Moriar’

George was the eldest of seven children. Four of his siblings died in infancy, and brother Arthur Ernest at age 19. The youngest, sister Jane, married Thomas SAWYER of York and had three children with him.

Find the family on the Shared Tree.

Today’s Image

On Crescent Hill this afternoon, the prospect was somewhat different to what it was nine years ago.

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Doubting Thomas

KNAPTONthosjenningsThis is the duplicate record for Thomas Jennings KNAPTON that caught my attention yesterday. Born in 1815, “my” Thomas was 41 years old when he married Sarah SMITH in Homerton, Middlesex. The couple’s first child, Annie Elizabeth, can be seen in the screenshot (left) You will notice that the children with the other Sarah were born between 1840 and 1849. It is theoretically possible that this was Thomas’ first family.

I already knew, however, that my Thomas Jennings, masquerading as “NAPTON”, was working as a draper’s assistant in High Ousegate, York in 1841, a single man living in the home of his employer, Robert BAINBRIDGE.

The GRO Index was available first thing this morning. Checking the births of the quartet of children revealed that their mother’s surname at birth was also SMITH. At the 1841 census, a Thomas Knapton and his wife Sarah were enumerated in Rawmarsh, Rotherham, with two children age 3 and 1. John, the youngest child in the screenshot, had an older brother, William. This Thomas worked as a coal miner. The next ten years saw the arrival of Mary, Elizabeth, Ann and George. Mary, of course, was missing from the 1851 household in Green Lane, Rawmarsh, but William, 13, was working down the pit and John, 10, would soon follow him below ground. With three wage-earners towards the end of 1851, the family may have been managing just fine.

Five days before Christmas, Thomas and John were killed in a methane explosion at the Warren Vale pit. They were among 32 miners whose funerals took place on the 23rd December. Nine more were buried the following day. In all, 52 men and boys lost their lives in the disaster. There is an account of the event online here.

Mr Burgin went down the pit again and gave an account of the operations that went on to […] inspect the mine and recover the bodies.

“We then got some tarpaulin sheets and nailed them in place of the trapdoors and stoppings, which were all blown down. We continued on the level where we found six bodies. We then went to the No.3, or far most bank, and found Thomas Knapton, Henry Gothard, Joshua Bugg, Charles Sylvester and Benjamin Lane.

They were all dead…

In 1861, Elizabeth, now 17, and her brother George, 12, were living with their uncle John Knapton, a coal owner and farmer. I couldn’t find their mother’s death as a Knapton. I think she remarried before 1861 but I haven’t attempted to trace her.

A sad case of mistaken identity on the Shared Tree.

Making Connections

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After gathering more information today and merging a bunch of duplicate IDs I have managed to connect the nine people on the three “family resemblance” stones to folk on the FamilySearch Shared Tree. The connections between the representatives of Foster, Harland and Spink stretched my pitiful graphic talents beyond breaking point but I’m offering a couple of illustrations anyway, in the hope of clarifying their situations.

First, the nine with their “stone names” and dates of arrival and departure.

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Now the nine with the names they were born with, and lines indicating their relationship links across the three stones.

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I have found only three children born to William FOSTER and Jane HARLAND – and there is one of them on each stone, though I perhaps haven’t made that clear in a linear fashion. The couple may have had more children because there is a gap of 13 years or so between the births of Jane and Editha Sarah Ann.

Editha waited until she was 49 years old before marrying widower Thomas Jennings KNAPTON. She was a married woman for seven years and a widow for 7 more. Two potential stepdaughters had died before she met Thomas, but a stepson, John Barry Knapton, may just have made it to his 80th birthday in 1939. He was named after his maternal grandfather, John Barry SMITH, of Osgodby Hall. Not the Osgodby near Scarborough but the one “near Thirsk”.

The three Foster children who rest eternally side by side probably lived together in their old age. In 1881 Editha was with her husband in Alma Square, Scarborough. Thomas died the following year and Editha ended her days in Filey. In 1881 William, who never married, was with widowed sister Jane in Clarence Terrace, Filey. It seems likely that Editha would have been invited to live with them. The houses are big enough.

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Clarence Terrace (now West Avenue) this morning.

Find Editha Sarah Ann on FamilySearch Tree. She may have been Thomas’ third wife. I have just noticed a duplicate record for him showing four other children by another wife named Sarah, but I can’t deal with the merge right now because the GRO Index is down for maintenance.

A Melancholy Suicide

Matthew COWTON was born in Reighton in 1808 but at some point moved to York where he was apprenticed to John DALE, Grocer and Tea Dealer. He married Jane JEFFERSON in York in 1830 and the first three of their children were born in that city. The next four opened their eyes in Scarborough, Jane’s home town before the family returned to York, where their last child and fifth daughter Frances was born in 1844.

Matthew gave his occupation as Grocer at the 1841 and 1851 censuses but also accrued wealth dealing in property. By some happenstance, he lost most of the property and, in some despair, turned to drink. Early in 1857, however, he managed to get some of his old properties back and was somewhat restored to health. In March he advertised the following Freehold Property in Reighton, near Bridlington:-

To be sold by Private Contract, Five Substantial Built COTTAGES, replete with every Convenience, and a Garden behind each; also a large Barn, Stable, and other Out-Buildings, with a Fold Yard adjoining the same, in the occupation of John Wood and others. The above Propery is situate in the centre of the Village. To treat for the same, apply to the Owner, Mr MATTHEW COWTON, 22, Goodramgate, York.

The following month, Matthew was appointed a Parochial Constable for Minster Yard with Bedern. In October he found himself accused, with several other policemen of assaulting two people he and a colleague were attempting to arrest – for being drunk and disorderly. Thomas and Mary Lyons put up a fight, using whatever implements came to their hands – a knife, a fender, a pan and a rolling pin. The constables called for reinforcements and eventually prevailed. By the time the Lyons reached the police station they were both bruised and bloodied and took out summonses against nine policemen, including Matthew.

The impending case must have driven Matthew back into depression and on Sunday before the case was to be heard, he got drunk by teatime, stumbled up to bed but hanged himself with a belt instead. Jane went up to check on her husband and found him awkwardly suspended. She called two men passing by the house and one pulled Matthew down. One of his sons saw he was still alive and a surgeon was called. Mr PROCTOR’s attempts to restore Matthew failed. After an Inquest in The Turk’s Head, the Coroner declared…

…the deceased hanged himself during a fit of temporary insanity brought on by anxiety about his property, and the habit of excessive drinking of intoxicating liquors.

A few days later three policemen were charged with assault upon Mr and Mrs Lyons and two others of damaging their property. Only Matthew’s colleague, HOLMES, was found guilty of assaulting Mary Lyons and was fined £2 plus costs. Matthew may well have been discharged with all the other defendants.

Only three months earlier, Matthew had witnessed the marriage of his eldest daughter, Christiana Matilda. He didn’t get to see the arrival of Joseph Edmund ELAND, his first grandchild, or to mourn the deaths of Christiana and her newborn fourth child a few years later. And, between these sweet and bitter events, his fourth daughter, Emily, died in Filey, aged 20. She is buried in St Oswald’s churchyard.

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Find Matthew on FamilySearch Tree.

Cousins

Affected by the too early deaths of Emily Charlotte Frances CARR and John William Arthur DANBY, I set about extending their pedigrees. An early discovery was the first-cousin marriage between two of Emily’s first cousins once removed, Charles ARDEN and Marian Charlotte LUNDY. It is my first first-cousin marriage and I thought I must have made some data entry errors! The common ancestors for Charles and Marian are the Reverend Francis LUNDY and Elizabeth BARBER, daughter of another man of the cloth, Thomas Gaunt Barber. (Francis and Elizabeth married each other twice within a few days, in each of the “family parishes”.)

If you go to Francis on FamilySearch Tree and toggle the next generation chevrons for Francis/Agnes and John Barker/Elizabeth Ann you’ll see the connection.

I next followed John’s mother back to her heartland at the southern edge of the North Yorkshire Moors. The SEATON family proved to be extensive and mobile and this morning I found myself in a York street I know well. I didn’t live in the city long but spent many a happy hour in the Impressions Gallery. A few doors away in Colliergate, Matthew MILLINGTON lived with his wife Bessy Seaton and, for too short a time, their only child, Joanna Ann. Joanna died aged 14 in 1880. So, she was only six years old when her second cousin John William Arthur Danby died. I wonder…

There is more work to do on the Seaton family so the connection to John and Joanna’s common ancestors isn’t yet established on FamilySearch Tree. But Joanna is here.

If I can get my act together tomorrow I will bus out to Kirkbymoorside, where John’s grandfather was born, and where his great grandfather died.